The state’s tourism industry kicks off a three-day annual conference today in Steamboat Springs….AAA says Coloradans are paying less at the gas pump than last week…Two of the four candidates in the race for the 3rd congressional seat will take part in a debate tonight night in Pueblo…Thirty-seven years after he was declared missing during the rescue of an American ship crew that was seized by the Khmer Rouge, a Colorado Marine native to LaJunta has been buried with military honors.

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Terry Sullivan’s Escape from Pikes Peak

You may of heard of Terry Sullivan’s recent escape (retirement) from the Colorado Springs Convention and Visitors Bureau but you’ve likely not heard the story of Sullivan’s harrowing helicopter adventure on the summit of America’s Mountain.

All of us at KRCC wish Terry good luck and [...]

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Stratton's Streetcars

On November 23, 2010 By

In this slide show of images from the Pikes Peak Library District’s Digital Photography Archive with text by Marshall Sprague from his history of the region, “Newport in the Rockies” (read by Craig Richardson), we hope you’ll catch a glimpse of Colorado Springs’ former public transportation glory as it was funded by millionaire gold king Winfield Scott Stratton.

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It’s almost impossible to believe how controversial many of Christo and Jean-Claude’s projects have been. After all, they work with fabric. Yet even in New York City the infamous Orange Gates took 26 years to realize after many controversies. The Over the River Project, which would cover 5.9 miles of the Arkansas River, is no different and there are 11 days left to comment.

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It’s easy to get frustrated about alternative forms of transportation in a Western town where cars are king, but if the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico isn’t reason enough to dream then we don’t know what is. Again, if you missed our two-part post on the past, present and future of [...]

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While the comprehensive city bicycle routes and trails map is (fingers crossed) close to completion and due out sometime this spring, Google Maps has just added a not-entirely-comprehensive-yet-pretty-darn-good bicycling directions to their already excellent maps feature.

While we might take issue with some of the zig-zagging routes and points of entry and [...]

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Bumpersticker Babylon

On January 14, 2010 By

Maybe it’s the ideological divide that runs down that imaginary Mason-Dixon line called Academy Boulevard. Or maybe it’s the pyramid power of Pikes Peak. Whatever it is, people in Colorado Springs love bumperstickers and obviously believe abundantly in their power to communicate identity, political ideas, music preferences and cute things about dogs and cats. [...]

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If you missed our two-part post on the past, present and future of trolleys in Colorado Springs last October, now would be a good time to have another look (Part 1 is HERE, and Part 2 is HERE). Why?

Mountain Metropolitan Transit (MMT) is hosting a public meeting Tuesday, Jan. [...]

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As we discussed in yesterday’s post, Streetcars in Colorado Springs!? (Part 1), there’s a great deal of interest in bringing back streetcars/trolleys for a lot of very good reasons, not the least of which is a proven record of stimulating economic development and tourism. While yesterday’s post was mostly about the nuts and bolts [...]

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For those of you in Colorado Springs who pine for the days of yore when you could hop aboard a charming streetcar, lean out into the foggy breeze and sing the Rice-a-Roni jingle to the world, you may be surprised to know that it’s not such a far-fetched pipe dream (with the possible [...]

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Fabulous Muscles

On August 17, 2009 By

However you might feel about cars as transportation, you’d have been hard pressed to keep your jaw from scraping the pavement at yesterday’s Good Times Car Show in Old Colorado City. Muscle cars (among other collector’s varieties we’re not qualified to name and elevated to what can only be described as art) lined [...]

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News

Steve Hebert for ProPublica
December 19, 2014 | NPR · Nonprofit hospitals provide assistance to poor patients in exchange for tax breaks. But some still seize wages of poor patients with unpaid bills — even those who qualify for free or reduced care.
 

AP
December 19, 2014 | NPR · Cuba is one of the least connected countries on Earth, with 5 percent of residents online. But it could become the Caribbean’s largest market if the Castros open the nation up to the Internet.
 

December 19, 2014 | NPR · Marine scientists plumbing the deepest part of the ocean sent microphones and collection probes baited with chicken to the bottom of a trench near Guam. Now they watch, wait … and listen.
 

Arts & Life

The Weinstein Company
December 19, 2014 | NPR · Walter Keane made his name with wistful paintings of big-eyed children — paintings actually done by his wife. Tim Burton directs and Amy Adams stars in Big Eyes, a new movie about the Keanes.
 

iStockphoto
December 19, 2014 | NPR · Pearl shares the books she loved this year that you might not have heard of. Her list includes a Hollywood satire, two thrillers, a young adult novel and a nonfiction book about World War I.
 

Film Movement
December 18, 2014 | NPR · The film If You Don’t, I Will has some strong dialogue and performances, but its tale of a marriage in peril sags too often in its recounting of the journey.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
December 18, 2014 | WXPN · We speak with the head of Nacional Records about three essential latin alternative songs.
 

Courtesy of the artist
December 18, 2014 | WXPN · David Dye sits down with Andrew Savage and Austin Brown to discuss their prolific year.
 

December 18, 2014 | NPR · Cuban rhythms and melodies have been part of what’s been called the most American of art forms — jazz — ever since Jelly Roll Morton first heard them in the port of New Orleans and used them in his music. Josephine Baker performed in Cuba and Nat King Cole recorded there. But the revolution made cultural exchange all but impossible and even supposedly open-minded artists and musicians took sides.
 

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