The Middle Distance, 7.12.13: Words for Nostalgia

There is a joke about a young man entering heaven. As he approaches the pearly gates, he sees a group of angels bound in chains. The young man asks St. Peter why and St. Peter replies: “Oh, they’re from Tennessee. We have to lock them up [...]

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The Middle Distance 6.28.13: Hey Yawwwwwwl!

A friend asked me yesterday what’s been in the news. She had not been paying attention. Let’s see, I said. More killing in Syria, more guns flowing in so even more will be killed. Edward Snowden is holed up somewhere in Moscow while the U.S. and Russia [...]

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The Midddle Distance 6.21.13: A Week in Summer

The week began with peonies. I counted 50 buds on the largest bush in the garden. They seemed to burst from their tight round buds all at once.

“Look at the girls in their ball gowns,” my friend said when she saw them, fluffy and [...]

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The Middle Distance 6.14.13: When the Lights Come Up

For the last six weeks, I’ve been taking a crash course in documentary filmmaking. I thought I’d be learning some technical terminology, a little technique, and a bit about how funding, marketing and distribution happens around nonfiction films.

I did learn these [...]

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The Middle Distance 6.7.13: Songs Arise

Call it whatever you want: sing-along, community sing, hootenanny. Singing together as humans has evolved as a tool of survival. Tribal histories were passed down in song. Urgent messages of pending invasions were delivered in the code language of rhythm and song. Revolutions were spearheaded by song. [...]

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The Middle Distance 5.31.13: A Revelation

For several years now, out here in the middle distance, I have made regular pilgrimages to Louisville, Kentucky, where at age 50, I entered graduate school. Coming to Kentucky, the state of my birth, was a homecoming of sorts after many years living out west.

The graduate [...]

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The Middle Distance 5.24.13: At Their Own Hands

As Memorial Day approaches, far too many American families are not thinking about what they’ll cook on the grill, but how they will remember their military dead, particularly the growing number who died at their own hands, of suicide.

I am the mother of [...]

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The Middle Distance 5.17.13: The Fitzgerald Swoon

When I was 17, someone made me read The Great Gatsby. I don’t remember the English teacher’s name, but I do remember the reverence and the slight hint of a romantic crush in her voice when she introduced our class to F. Scott Fitzgerald. I became [...]

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The Middle Distance 5.10.13: A Mother’s Day Letter to My Children

Hey, y’all:

I’m writing because Sunday is Mother’s Day, and at this late date, out here in the middle distance, I am still as confounded by the holiday as I was when you were growing up.

Yesterday someone asked me what I [...]

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The Middle Distance 5.3.13: Potluck Reunion

Here are the mothers, hands on hips, surveying the table for space, considering what, if anything, might be missing. Aunt Erma presides, my grandmother’s sister who still lives on these remaining acres of family land. Aunts and uncles and cousins have come from as far as the [...]

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The Middle Distance 4.26.13: April

If you could see the snow flowing down past the bedroom window, silencing the mid-April morning, you might not know where you are. Then you would remember: you are at home at the foot of the Colorado Rocky Mountains where this is the peculiar incarnation of spring.

[...]

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The Middle Distance 4.12.13: The Seed Underground

I bought this book on impulse. There was that charming cover with earthen bowls nestling beans and seeds and vegetables, with labels handwritten in pencil. It was April and the urge to put seeds in the ground had become overwhelming, even in the face of a [...]

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The Middle Distance 4.5.13: She and I

She is up before dawn every day, no matter the season. While the rest of us grab a last few minutes of sleep, she pulls on her puffy blue robe, pads barefoot across the house to the front door and picks up the daily paper off [...]

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The Middle Distance 3.29.13: Anthems of the Resurrection

Last Sunday, Christian churches around the world remembered Jesus’ final entry into Jerusalem on a donkey. Revelers along the road spread palm fronds and, according to the New Testament, many laid their coats on the road to make a path for this unlikely king who [...]

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The Middle Distance 3.22.13:

Over the last 13 years, there have been three brief moments when the world grew so quiet I could nearly hear my own heartbeat. The first was in 2000 when I read Colorado author Kent Haruf’s deceptively simple and deeply humane novel Plainsong. The second was in 2004, [...]

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The Middle Distance 3.15.13: An Old, Familiar Sleeplessness

On the road to the mountains, March clouds hang heavy with the promise of snow. Winding past Florissant and Lake George and across the flat expanse of South Park, columns of sunlight peek out then disappear. Hoosier Pass is windy and wet, and by the time [...]

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The Middle Distance 2.24.12: Sweet Old Lady

I want to apologize for ever referring to someone as a “sweet old lady.” Forgive me, sisters. I wasn’t thinking when I did it, and I hadn’t yet reached the age where I could be described by that cloying pejorative phrase. I’m still not there, but at [...]

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The Middle Distance 3.1.13: I Spy

When I was 9, I decided to be a spy. This was not what I wanted to be when I grew up, but right then and there, in my sleepy, southern Kentucky hometown where it seemed nothing ever happened except in books.

This was 1964, and [...]

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The Middle Distance 2.22.13:Age-Rage-Oholic

It is time to confess. I am an age-rage-oholic.

What’s that, you say? It’s the unreasonable creeping of heat up my spine and into my face when I see that someone young and bright and attractive has accomplished at, say, age 30, what I have coveted and dreamed about and [...]

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The Middle Distance 2.15.13: Perfect Day

I caught up with a friend, recently, who after many years of being single is remarrying this summer. Following a period of solitude and consideration of what she wanted in life, she decided to actively pursue a long-term relationship with a man. She found him [...]

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The Midddle Distance 2.8.13: Both Sides of the Octagon

I can only imagine the scene on Tuesday afternoon at the grand old Orpheum Theater in downtown Phoenix. Not a traveling Broadway show or a concert, but a memorial service for a local man, Mark Hummels, a 43-year old attorney gunned down during a [...]

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The Middle Distance 2.1.13

Donald Anderson has done what most writers and would-be writers wish they had done: kept all the snippets and notes and observations of a lifetime — some funny, some profound, some more developed than others, some mere grace notes — and put them together in what he calls “a [...]

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The Middle Distance 1.25.13: Songs of Innocence & Experience

The older I get, the more I understand that the personal stories I tell are factually true only in part, and that how I choose to tell them says a lot about who I am on this journey, this solo adventure, this one-shot [...]

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News

October 23, 2014 | NPR · The rate for routine vaccinations of babies used to be 97 percent. Now the figure is 27 percent. Blame it on the rippling effects of the oubreak.
 

AFP/Getty Images
October 23, 2014 | NPR · The blunt-talking Moshe Ya’alon says that Syria, Iraq and Libya have all been shattered by fighting in recent years and that the future map of the Middle East will look very different.
 

AFP/Getty Images
October 23, 2014 | NPR · The mayor of Iguala and his wife, accused of being connected to the disappearance of 43 students, are now fugitives. Thousands of protesters marched in Mexico City Wednesday demanding justice.
 

Arts & Life

Luma Bites
October 22, 2014 | NPR · Two entrepreneurs have developed new tricks to make food that’s literally illuminating, using ingredients that are as natural and unprocessed as possible. It’s just basic food chemistry, folks.
 

October 22, 2014 | NPR · When Gerard Russell was a diplomat in the Middle East, he met followers of ancient religions facing extinction. His new book includes the origins of the Yazidis, who are fleeing the Islamic State.
 

October 22, 2014 | NPR · Atavist Books launched with aims of upending the print-first publishing model. Now it’s announcing its plans to close. Meanwhile, partnerships between public libraries and airports are taking off.
 

Music

October 22, 2014 | NPR · Steven Ellison has built an impressive reputation among critics and fans in the know for mixing hip hop, jazz and electronica into something original. But even for the aforementioned followers, the new album from Ellison — better-known as Flying Lotus — is a surprise. It’s all about death, not as something to be mourned but as a journey to be anticipated.
 

Mountain Stage
October 22, 2014 | NPR · The West Virginia natives, both widely respected in the world of string-band music, perform live.
 

Courtesy of the artist
October 22, 2014 | WXPN · The rootsy folk-rock band formed after its singer heard a harpist through his apartment wall.
 

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