Aspen trees in Colorado are still feeling the effects of drought that occurred a decade ago. The southern Rockies have lost more than one point three million acres of aspen, and some stands in lower elevations continue to die off. As the much of the state grapples with current drought conditions, scientists are still [...]

Continue Reading

Today at 4:06pm (in the Mountain time zone) our planetary neighbor Venus, the one with the hell-fire sulfuric acid atmosphere, will gallantly pass between us and the Sun, kind of like the solar eclipse we experienced a few weeks ago but far rarer and far less noticeable. You see, this has only happened 52 times [...]

Continue Reading

If you missed the Joseph Scheer exhibition at I.D.E.A. Space last fall and/or this interview we did with him, AND you find yourself disgusted/intrigued with this Springs’s Miller Moth swarm, perhaps this feature will cheer you a bit, if not give you a little more apprecation for our dusty brown visitors.

(Scans [...]

Continue Reading

Pueblo County sheriff’s officials say a 53-year-old man has died after an accident at Evraz North America’s rod and bar mill in Pueblo…

Warm weather in Colorado has come early this year and so has an abundance of miller moths…

CDOT held a memorial service today for workers killed in highway accidents through the [...]

Continue Reading

When people think about earthquakes, Colorado may not exactly be the first place that comes to mind. But in the past couple decades, the Trinidad region has experienced a surprising number of seismic events. Scientists and locals alike are wondering just what is causing them. KRCC’s Michelle Mercer reports.

This story was featured [...]

Continue Reading

Mother Nature affects us all, and no matter how much we want the weather to remain consistent, it’s always changing. This month, we take a look at weather, climate, and natural disasters in the region, and at least one way in which we’ve changed that which Mother Nature intended.

Continue Reading

Studying pythons might seem an unlikely way to help people with heart disease. But a python’s remarkable ability to quickly enlarge its heart and other organs during digestion is leading some medical researchers at the University of Colorado toward surprising new therapies. From Boulder, KRCC’s Shelley Schlender reports.

Continue Reading

El Paso County health officials say there’s been a sharp increase in gastrointestinal illness in the region since the beginning of December, and say it’s likely due to an infection caused by norovirus…and, Earthquakes continue to crop up along the Colorado-New Mexico border.

Continue Reading

A new study highlights a lack of access to mental health care in many parts of Colorado…and, Colorado has applied to the Federal Aviation Administration for a federal spaceport designation.

Continue Reading

The Colorado State University System Board of Governors voted unanimously this morning to select Lesley Di Mare as the next president of CSU-Pueblo…and, One of this year’s Nobel Prize winners in physics is Saul Perlmutter, who heads the Supernova Cosmology Project in California, and a Colorado College professor works on the project team.

Colorado [...]

Continue Reading

The Census Bureau says El Paso County has officially surpassed Denver as Colorado’s most populous county and that Hispanics of any race now account for one-fifth of the state’s population…and, a team from Cheyenne Mountain Zoo in Colorado Springs recently returned from Panama as part of an amphibian conservation effort.

Listen to a story [...]

Continue Reading

This weekend in Washington, the American Association for the Advancement of Science presented CU-Denver professor John Cohen with its top award for Promoting Public Understanding of Science and Technology. KRCC’s Shelley Schlender has this profile.

Photo courtesy CU-Denver’s School of Medicine.

Continue Reading

In the 1800s, Christmas was a popular time for bird shooting contests. But an early officer of the Audubon Society pushed to change those annual bird kills to an annual bird count. Now, from mid-December through January 5th, tens of thousands of citizen scientists conduct Christmas bird counts nationwide. In order to bring you the [...]

Continue Reading

NASA is creating a pilot project in Colorado aimed at helping companies develop and manufacture new energy technologies. The space agency hopes to one day expand the program across the country. Bente Birkeland has more.

Continue Reading

Ovens, ranges, microwaves…all these are common in Colorado homes. Worldwide, most food gets heated over portable cookstoves that burn wood, dung or straw, often inefficiently, generating smoke that can lead to deadly respiratory disease. The United States has recently signed on to help clean up this pollution. Some leaders in solving the problem are [...]

Continue Reading


Scientists in Denver say ice age fossils recently uncovered in Snowmass Village will provide a wealth of information about climate change and global warming, and a vast high elevation ecosystem they didn’t even know existed. So far they’ve uncovered about 600 bones from the site and [...]

Continue Reading

[slideshow id=37]

Scientists are calling it an “amphibian Armageddon.” In the last 30 years, more than 100 species of frogs and toads have been wiped out by habitat loss and amphibian chytrid, a fungus that attacks their skin. No one knows why this common fungus is suddenly proving fatal. Some think climate change is making [...]

Continue Reading

Cell phones, scanners, TVs and radios have all been tested for safety. But how they interact with living cells is not well understood. Sorting out these effects is the goal of a conference this Sunday, at the School of Mines in Golden. Shelley Schlender reports.

Continue Reading

[slideshow id=30]

A tiny owl that lives in the Rocky Mountains could provide important clues about how wildlife is adapting to a warmer climate. KRCC’s Eryn Gable trekked out with Colorado College biology professor Brian Linkhart to find out just what secrets this little bird might hold.

Disclaimer: Colorado College is KRCC’s licensee.

Continue Reading

Round-Up

On September 2, 2009 By

Governor Ritter signs an executive order telling state agencies cut costs…A National Science Foundation program considers two sites in Rocky Mountain National Park to monitor impacts of global warming, land use changes, and invasive species…and, Colorado is set to receive $2.8 million as part of Pfizer Inc.’s national settlement.

Continue Reading

Round-Up

On August 25, 2009 By

Coloradans scored higher than the national average on the SAT college entrance exam…Organizers gather signatures seeking a ballot proposal on legal protections for human embryos…vandalism at the Colorado Democratic headquarters…and, more.

Continue Reading

Round-Up

On July 22, 2009 By

Colorado health officials say Hispanics and Native Americans have the highest percentage of adults without health insurance in the state…Governor Bill Ritter announces state furlough days…and, University of Colorado researchers release a report on global warming and the Colorado River.

Continue Reading

Elementary school students at he Classical Academy in northern Colorado Springs got a visit yesterday from former astronaut Jim Reilly, as part of the Space Foundation’s outreach to local schools to stress the importance of space-based science and math education. KRCC’s Aaron Retka spoke with Brian DeBates of the Space Foundation and attended [...]

Continue Reading

News

AP
October 31, 2014 | NPR · Philip Banks III was set to become Commissioner William Bratton’s deputy. The reasons for his abrupt resignation are not clear.
 

October 31, 2014 | NPR · This week, the Federal Reserve ended the quantitative easing program. Author John Lanchester says Anthony Trollope’s 19th-century novel, The Way We Live Now, clarifies the current financial situation.
 

NPR
October 31, 2014 | NPR · The Day of the Dead is a time when Mexicans remember loved ones with grand floral tributes. But the atmosphere is downbeat in the state of Guerrero, where 43 students are still missing.
 

Arts & Life

October 31, 2014 | NPR · This week, the Federal Reserve ended the quantitative easing program. Author John Lanchester says Anthony Trollope’s 19th-century novel, The Way We Live Now, clarifies the current financial situation.
 

HBO
October 31, 2014 | NPR · “I’ve made a career of playing small supporting roles,” McDormand says. And in a four-hour HBO miniseries she plays Kitteridge, a supporting character who “should be a leading lady.”
 

University of Alabama Press
October 31, 2014 | NPR · There’s nothing like a good ghost story on Halloween — and some of the best tales were told by the late storyteller and NPR commentator Kathryn Tucker Windham.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
October 31, 2014 | NPR · In an interview with NPR’s Melissa Block, Swift addresses what’s changed since she began her career — not just for her, but for the teenaged girls that have always been her biggest supporters.
 

October 31, 2014 | NPR · The Metropolitan Opera will be celebrating New Year’s Eve with Franz Lehar’s The Merry Widow in a new production starring soprano Fleming. But its greatest incarnations have been on film.
 

October 31, 2014 | NPR · Hear music for the season and spine-chilling Scottish tales, narrated by host Fiona Ritchie.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab