Across the corn belt, farmers are pulling out all the stops in their war the corn rootworm. They’re returning to chemical pesticides, because the weapons of biotechnology — inserted genes that are supposed to kill the rootworm — aren’t working so well anymore.

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Many violent crimes are hastily planned and poorly considered, researchers at the University of Chicago’s Crime Lab find. Training troubled teens to slow down and put a more benign spin on what they imagine the other guy is thinking significantly reduced the kids’ likelihood of committing a crime.

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Synthetic biologist Jay Keasling has already taught yeast to make the leading anti-malarial drug. His next project takes the technology a step further, using yeast to turn plant waste into diesel — and maybe gasoline and jet fuel, too.

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NASA has a plan to fend off giant asteroids, but what about tsunamis, earthquakes, storms that last 45 days and mammoth floods? Earth scientists say science-based strategies can help communities prepare for the worst of the worst.

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Researchers are developing a technology that could draw carbon dioxide directly out of the air. It’s very expensive now, but it works, and one company is already trying to identify a market for all that captured greenhouse gas.

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From savoring a morning coffee to lighting a candle each night, people employ rituals all over the world. NPR science correspondent Shankar Vedantam speaks with behavior scientist Francesca Gino and Slate columnist William Saletan about the role of rituals in human life.

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An enterprising carpenter and a creative puppeteer teamed up on a do-it-yourself project to build a mechanical hand for a little boy. They created an inexpensive prosthetic and published their designs on the Internet. So far, over 100 children have been outfitted.

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Management gurus have long preached the value of ethical leadership. In the presence of ethical leadership — but the absence of ethical co-workers — what happens to people’s honesty?

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Itch can be a useful warning sign, or a maddening symptom with no cure. But the origins of itch have long been a mystery. Scientists think they’ve come closer to understanding the origins of itch in a molecule that makes mice scratch like mad.

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Director of KRCC’s Backyard Observatory, Mike Procell, strolls about the heavens and extends a stellar invitation unto you to attend KRCC’s first Backyard Star Party April 12th at Zero Dusk Thirty – 912 N Weber St in space age Colorado Springs.

All the details are HERE.

Oh, and in case you [...]

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In research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scientists found brain scans can predict with startling accuracy the likelihood that criminals will run afoul of the law again. The results require serious legal and ethical debate before being introduced into the criminal justice system. David Greene talks to Kent Kiehl, a professor of psychology at the University of New Mexicow, and lead author of this mind research study.

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Expressing regret may grease the social wheels, but not doing so boosts your sense of power, control and self-worth. Try explaining that to your boss.

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A government study of the medical records of 1,000 kids found no correlation between the number of vaccines a child received and his or her risk of autism spectrum disorder. Experts hope the finding will allay some parents who worry that many vaccines on one day or in the first two years of life may lead to autism.

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Researchers are using cellular machinery to turn E. coli bacteria into little computers. By creating on/off switches that are similar to electrictronic transistors, scientists can control each microbe’s behavior.

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How do oysters attach themselves to rocks? They need a glue, but a glue that can set in a watery environment. In this installment of “Joe’s Big Idea,” NPR’s Joe Palca reports that glue could lead to medical advances.

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When abiding fear takes over some kids’ lives, they respond with anger and aggression that’s not premeditated. One psychiatrist says he’s finding profound relief for a particular subgroup of these children in experimental research with the anesthesia drug ketamine.

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If you’re a member of KRCC and you enjoy stargazing, consider yourself invited to a star party we’re throwing for our members here at the station on Friday, April 12th. From about 7:30 to 10:30PM that evening members of the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society will have their telescopes set up in our backyard here at [...]

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At a heavy metal concert five years ago, physicist Jesse Silverberg had a “eureka” moment: The jumping, raucous fans at the show seemed to be moving about like molecules in the air we breathe. So he and friend Matt Bierbaum set out to understand the patterns within mosh pit motion.

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Universal background checks for all gun purchases, and a ban on high capacity magazines are among the five Democratic backed gun bills clearing the state senate after a vigorous debate yesterday…Amidst possible gun legislation at the statehouse and in Washington, El Paso County Sheriff Terry Maketa and County Commissioner Peggy Littleton have scheduled a public town hall-style meeting Thursday…A teacher from Center High School in rural Southern Colorado has been awarded a prestigious national teaching award for science and technology.

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A teacher from Center High School in rural Southern Colorado has been awarded a prestigious National teaching award for science and technology. KRCC’s Hannah Sohl reports.

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A new study led by a team of University of Colorado scientists shows that mid-level altitude forests are the most sensitive to rising global temperatures and a decline in snowpack. As KUNC‘s Kirk Siegler reports, the study was done in California but researchers say its findings apply across the entire West.

Scientists [...]

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Sally Ride, the astronaut and physicist who sparked the spirit of inspiration in the nation when she became the first American woman to travel to space in 1983, died yesterday of pancreatic cancer, she was 61. Ride spent the last several years of her life dedicated to the pursuit of increasing the profile of math [...]

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Residents in and near the Waldo Canyon burn areas have been encouraged to purchase flood insurance if they don’t already have it. New federal legislation recently signed into law waives a 30-day waiting period for some new policies to take effect. Meanwhile, a team of scientists has been examining damaged land to understand the [...]

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