Thousands of firefighters are gathered in Prescott, Ariz., today to honor the Granite Mountain Hotshots, the 19 firefighters who were killed by a wildfire on Sunday, June 30. The speakers included Vice President Joe Biden, who said, “All men are created equal. But then, a few became firefighters.”

Continue Reading

The wearable technology, which is being tested by a select group of users, was used to record an arrest on the Jersey Shore. The incident raises questions about citizen journalism and the limits of privacy in public.

Continue Reading

Photographer Ty Wright set out to see whether Nevada’s Route 50 is really the loneliest road. And if so, who lives there?

Continue Reading

Military chief Abdel Fattah El Sissi says that Mohammed Morsi is out as president and the country’s constitution has been suspended. Egypt’s chief justice will hold power during the transitional period and set a date for early presidential elections.

Continue Reading

Nearly all of the firefighters who died were part of the Granite Mountain Hotshots, an elite group based in Prescott, Ariz. The Yarnell Hill Fire has destroyed an estimated 200 homes since it began Friday.

Continue Reading

The civil war in Syria is expected to become the focus of peace negotiations in the coming weeks. The city of Homs became famous early in the conflict. While not as many reports are being filed from there, the fighting between rebels and government troops continues.

Continue Reading

In 2003, Richard Rubin set out to talk to every American veteran of World War I he could find. With help from the French, he tracked down dozens of centenarian vets and recorded their stories in a new book called The Last of the Doughboys.

Continue Reading

Culatello. Capocollo. Sopressata. It will soon be legal to import a whole new world of Italian cured pork products, thanks to the USDA’s decision to end a decades-long ban. Every Italian region and province, and even many towns have their own distinctive salumi.

Continue Reading

By the end of the century, ocean levels could rise by 2 or 3 feet. That’s enough to flood the colonists’ first settlement at Jamestown, Va. And it’s putting pressure on archaeologists to get as many artifacts out of the ground as quickly as possible — before it’s too late.

Continue Reading

An Indiana farmer bought soybeans that he knew likely included some with genetic modifications developed by Monsanto. The agribusiness giant sued because it controls the patent on such soybeans. The Supreme Court says the farmer infringed on Monsanto’s legal rights.

Continue Reading

What makes NPR reporters’ names so particularly mellifluous? There’s that pleasing alliteration — Allison Aubrey, Louisa Lim, Carl Kassell, Susan Stamberg. And it’s hard to match those mouth-filling double-barrelled names. Think Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson…(excerpt)

Continue Reading

For quite a while, the annual number of fatalities from auto accidents has been a kind of shorthand for health issues that are big and important. Suicides now exceed deaths from crashes. And the middle-aged have seen the biggest increase in suicide rates.

Continue Reading

The explosions happened near the finish line of the marathon about four hours after it started. There are reports of several injuries.

Continue Reading

The rock found in Morocco was even weirder than it looked. The olive green chunk, speckled with white and brown, has chemical and physical properties similar to the planet Mercury. But some experts doubt that the 4.56-billion-year-old meteorite is from the planet closest to our sun.

Continue Reading

The country’s jazz scene is young, but it’s hit the world stage quickly thanks in large part to public funding. For Norwegian musicians, it literally pays to dream big — and to write lots of grant applications.

Continue Reading

An obscure tax provision crafted for drug dealers is giving state-licensed medical marijuana dispensaries a headache. Federal income tax rates for dispensaries in Colorado can soar to 70 percent because businesses can’t claim certain deductions. It’s a policy the industry is trying to change.

Continue Reading

Building huge turbine farms too close together might significantly reduce their power, some atmospheric scientists say. The problem is “wind shadow” — the turbulence created by one big cluster of turbines that steals wind from another cluster down the road.

Continue Reading

Pentagon officials say they’re opening ground combat jobs to women as a matter of equality. But the military also needs them because the number of military-age men who qualify for service is declining.

Continue Reading

Some Colorado doctors who’ve treated victims of recent mass shootings and everyday gun violence say they’re deeply disturbed by and opposed to guns. But other doctors don’t support the new gun restrictions lawmakers are talking about in Denver and Washington, D.C.

Continue Reading

Wyoming has the highest suicide rate in the U.S., and two thirds of the state’s suicides are by firearm. Like much of the West, Wyoming’s gun ownership rates are high, and gun culture is strong. The state’s relationship with guns has made suicide prevention efforts tough, but that may be changing.

Continue Reading

What if a gun could only be fired by its rightful owner? What if it recognized a grip or fingerprint, or communicated with a special ring? It’s been a fantasy for years, and in the wake of the Sandy Hook tragedy, so-called smart gun technology is back in the spotlight.

Continue Reading

Over a long and sometimes troubled career with bands like Songs: Ohia and Magnolia Electric Co., Jason Molina’s songs made pain tangible and less terrifying.

Continue Reading

But it’s likely that the Higgs Boson, a subatomic particle thought to give everything its mass, will be known by the moniker for a long time, Dick Teresi explained.

Continue Reading

News

?>

Arts & Life

?>

Music

?>

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab