Colorado’s four month legislative session opened today…and Colorado’s costs for housing foreign-born inmates.

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For resident Duane Slocum and his wife, service is simply a part of their lives, and of their faith. In today’s “Citizen Report,” Slocum describes where their calling has taken them. (Encore presentation.)

(The “Citizen Report” is a collaboration between KRCC and the Colorado Springs Gazette. More citizen journalism can be found at Continue Reading

Round-Up

On October 15, 2009 By

Republican lawmakers question the prisoner release plan as a way to save money…and, taking an early look at the race for Colorado’s 4th Congressional District.

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Round-Up

On September 17, 2009 By

H1N1, or swine flu, is suspected in Colorado Springs’ Cesar Chavez Academy absences…County commissioners in three southern Colorado counties are concerned about the economic impacts of the state possibly releasing inmates early…and, the legislative committee tasked with examining the state chartered workers’ compensation insurance company is scheduled to vote tomorrow.

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Round-Up

On August 11, 2009 By

The maximum security prison in Florence gets a new warden…Colorado Springs Mayor Lionel Rivera is cleared of a conflict-of-interest complaint…and, “Colorado Pioneer” plates no longer need proof.

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For resident Duane Slocum and his wife, service is simply a part of their lives, and of their faith. In today’s “Citizen Report,” Slocum describes where their calling has taken them.

(The “Citizen Report” is a collaboration between the Colorado Springs Gazette and KRCC. More information is available at the YourHub [...]

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Colorado’s senators still back shutting down Guantanamo Bay…and, Governor Bill Ritter vetoes an unemployment bill.

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The death penalty in Colorado is not going anywhere. A measure to repeal it failed in the state senate by one vote, and that final vote followed a dramatic, heart felt debate. Bente Birkeland reports from Denver.

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The state senate all but killed a measure to repeal Colorado’s death penalty yesterday. Five Democratic senators joined Republicans to radically change the bill at the last minute, but it still needs a final vote. Bente Birkeland reports from Denver.

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Colorado’s death penalty is one step closer to being done away with. Members of the state veterans and military affairs committee passed a bill yesterday to eliminate the death penalty on a party line vote. The measure must still pass the appropriations committee before it could go to the full senate for further debate. Bente [...]

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Jerry Carle is known to many simply as “Coach.” Carle led the Colorado College football team for 33 years, and when the school recently made the economic decision to shut down its football program, President Dick Celeste and Athletic Director Ken Ralph visited Carle to break the news personally. In this week’s “Citizen [...]

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A bill to repeal the death penalty in Colorado cleared the house on Tuesday, but not after some high drama at the state capitol. The swing vote came down to a single lawmaker who was undecided until the very end. Bente Birkeland reports from Denver.

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Round-Up

On April 21, 2009 By

Bill to repeal the death penalty in Colorado moves forward…and a water pipeline gets approval.

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After hours of passionate debate, a bill that would get rid of the death penalty in Colorado initially cleared the House by a narrow margin on Wednesday. The measure aims to use the savings to help investigate unsolved murders and beef up the state’s budget. Bente Birkeland reports from Denver.

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The sponsor of a measure to repeal the death penalty in Colorado says he’s hopeful that his bill will pass the legislature this time around. House Bill 1274 cleared the house judiciary committee on a party line vote late last month, but won’t be up for debate for another few weeks. The bill [...]

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The Colorado Department of Corrections says the proposed budget cuts announced for their department, including the closure of two state prisons and delaying the opening of another, are about what they expected given the economic climate. A department spokeswoman says the cuts won’t effect public safety. Bente Birkeland reports from Denver.

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Republican state lawmakers are circulating a petition criticizing Governor Bill Ritter for saying he would support Guantanamo Bay prisoners being housed in Colorado. The state is home to “Supermax,” one of four federal prisons the Obama administration is considering moving Guantanamo detainees to. Bente Birkeland reports from Denver.

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News

AP
August 30, 2014 | NPR · The U.S. Navy warrant officer recruited his son, brother and a friend to help him steal and sell classified message keys to the USSR over a 17-year period.
 

EPA/Landov
August 30, 2014 | NPR · Speaking at a meeting of European Union foreign ministers, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko says the West needs to make an “appropriate response” to the Kremlin’s aggression.
 

August 30, 2014 | NPR · The fiancée of Al Jazeera journalist Mohammed Fahmy, jailed in Cairo, stays in touch with him and plans their wedding, even as the case languishes and world attention on it dims.
 

Arts & Life

August 30, 2014 | NPR · Abercrombie & Fitch is shedding its traditional logo-focused apparel. That logo, and the clothes it was affixed to, made the brand one of the most sought-after among teens in the past two decades.
 

Courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press
August 30, 2014 | NPR · In her new collection Worn Stories, Emily Spivack compiles odes to beloved pieces of clothing, written by celebrities and fashionistas.
 

Getty Images
August 30, 2014 | NPR · The great Argentinian writer Julio Cortázar was born 100 years ago this week; while Cortázar is known for the surreal masterpiece Hopscotch, critic Juan Vidal says it’s his poetry that resonates.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
August 30, 2014 | NPR · The tuba was the first bass instrument in jazz, until it was replaced by the string bass. For nearly 50 years, Bob Stewart has been trying to carve out a new niche for his instrument in modern jazz.
 

Courtesy of the artist
August 30, 2014 | NPR · As a student at Princeton, D’Amato was mentored in his songwriting by professor and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Paul Muldoon.
 

NPR
August 30, 2014 | NPR · The Kentucky native writes country music about loneliness, failed dreams, drinking and drugs. Here, he performs four of his songs with a thundering voice that makes the NPR offices shudder.
 

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