Colorado earned bragging rights yesterday, but not the good kind. The state has the fastest growing childhood poverty rate in the country for the third year in a row. The data was released in a new report from the non-partisan Colorado Children’s Campaign. Bente Birkeland takes a look behind the numbers.

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Several hundred people who’ve been living in Colorado Springs’ parks will soon have to find a new address. That’s after, as the Gazette reports, the city council officially passed an ordinance yesterday to ban camping on city property. The city’s charities and police department have worked for months to get ready for the change. Continue Reading

Round-Up

On October 20, 2009 By

Colorado School of Mines holds an oil shale symposium…Colorado lawmakers consider proposals aimed at reducing poverty…and, unionized grocery workers and Safeway head back to the bargaining table.

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A state task force aimed at cutting poverty in half over the next decade held it’s first working meeting at the state capitol on Monday. Lawmakers were briefed on different ways to measure poverty and combat it. Bente Birkeland reports from Denver.

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Round-Up

On July 27, 2009 By

A committee meets for the first time to study poverty in Colorado…another committee looks at waste tires…a federal agency plans to look into phone subsidies…and, the Department of Energy and Bureau of Land Management extends a public comment period for studying where to build solar power plants.

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Round-Up

On June 17, 2009 By

Colorado holds the highest growth rate for children living in poverty…Gov. Bill Ritter attends the Western Governors’ Association meetings…a subcommittee approves extending a spending ban on the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site…and, Representative Betsy Markey testifies for wildfire mitigation.

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News

AP
February 6, 2016 | NPR · Again, the Republicans engaged in an intense brawl that was framed by Carson’s delayed entrance and an tough confrontation between Chris Christie and Marco Rubio.
 

February 6, 2016 | NPR · It was the last debate before the New Hampshire primary and Donald Trump was back onstage. Which GOP candidate ended up with the most talking time?
 

Getty Images
February 6, 2016 | NPR · Marco Rubio fast became a target, Donald Trump kept a lower profile and Ted Cruz, who won in Iowa, was on defense straight off the bat.
 

Arts & Life

WireImage
February 6, 2016 | NPR · Game of Thrones may have killed off many major characters, but the manipulative, scheming Queen Cersei is still standing. We’ve invited Headey to play a game called “You win and you die.”
 

February 6, 2016 | NPR · NPR’s Ina Jaffe talks with Scott Simon about the struggle to find the right words to describe older people. Longevity and lifestyles have changed and the language hasn’t kept up.
 

AP
February 6, 2016 | NPR · Daring visual artists, whose edgy work challenges religious and political taboos, have become a critical voice in the conservative kingdom — where open calls for reform are a criminal offense.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
February 6, 2016 | NPR · With more than 80 world premieres to her credit, Barbrara Hannigan, an intrepid soprano and conductor, has a knack for making modern music sound effortless and approachable.
 

Coldplay Music/YouTube
February 6, 2016 | NPR · These days, it’s pretty much impossible to miss a discussion on cultural appropriation. But we explore where we draw the line between what’s acceptable and what’s downright offensive.
 

Courtesy of the artist
February 6, 2016 | NPR · The duo School of Seven Bells wrote its final album together in 2012. Alejandra Deheza didn’t know then that her bandmate and songwriting partner wouldn’t live to see its release.
 

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