Colorado earned bragging rights yesterday, but not the good kind. The state has the fastest growing childhood poverty rate in the country for the third year in a row. The data was released in a new report from the non-partisan Colorado Children’s Campaign. Bente Birkeland takes a look behind the numbers.

Continue Reading

Several hundred people who’ve been living in Colorado Springs’ parks will soon have to find a new address. That’s after, as the Gazette reports, the city council officially passed an ordinance yesterday to ban camping on city property. The city’s charities and police department have worked for months to get ready for the change. Continue Reading

Round-Up

On October 20, 2009 By

Colorado School of Mines holds an oil shale symposium…Colorado lawmakers consider proposals aimed at reducing poverty…and, unionized grocery workers and Safeway head back to the bargaining table.

Continue Reading

A state task force aimed at cutting poverty in half over the next decade held it’s first working meeting at the state capitol on Monday. Lawmakers were briefed on different ways to measure poverty and combat it. Bente Birkeland reports from Denver.

Continue Reading

Round-Up

On July 27, 2009 By

A committee meets for the first time to study poverty in Colorado…another committee looks at waste tires…a federal agency plans to look into phone subsidies…and, the Department of Energy and Bureau of Land Management extends a public comment period for studying where to build solar power plants.

Continue Reading

Round-Up

On June 17, 2009 By

Colorado holds the highest growth rate for children living in poverty…Gov. Bill Ritter attends the Western Governors’ Association meetings…a subcommittee approves extending a spending ban on the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site…and, Representative Betsy Markey testifies for wildfire mitigation.

Continue Reading

News

DPA/Landov
January 31, 2015 | NPR · The German chancellor says she wants to keep Athens in the eurozone, but that EU lenders have already made substantial concessions on the terms of the bailout.
 

AP
January 31, 2015 | NPR · The tennis superstar beat Russia’s Maria Sharapova in the final 6-3 7-6 (7-5). She is now third in a list of Grand Slam singles champs.
 

January 31, 2015 | NPR · This year marks 25 years of the original Ice Hotel, carved from snow and ice bricks in far northern Sweden. It’s also an annual art contest, where visiting artists sculpt and created their own rooms.
 

Arts & Life

January 31, 2015 | NPR · Poet Rod McKuen was loved by millions but mocked by literary critics. He died this week at age 81.
 

January 31, 2015 | NPR · Who says a beheaded man can’t still be head of state? NPR’s Scott Simon speaks with British journalist, author and TV host Andrew Marr about his novel, Head of State.
 

January 31, 2015 | NPR · Acclaimed writer Daniel Handler, a.k.a. Lemony Snickett, drew criticism last year for a racist comment at a literary event. NPR’s Scott Simon speaks with Handler about his new novel, We Are Pirates.
 

Music

Courtesy of the Revenant Archives
January 31, 2015 | NPR · Music was an afterthought for Paramount Records, a short-lived label founded by a furniture company. But in its final years, it gave vital exposure to the artists who would come to define Delta blues.
 

Courtesy of the artist
January 31, 2015 | NPR · Krall’s new album is a collection of songs she first heard on vinyl, from The Mamas & the Papas to the Eagles. She discusses getting know the originals and sharing music with her twin sons.
 

January 30, 2015 | NPR · Named after the mosquito-borne disease, LA’s band Dengue Fever combines psychedelic rock with Cambodian pop. For over a decade, the six member band have managed to stay relevant by sticking to this offbeat idea and introducing new sounds.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab