Colorado earned bragging rights yesterday, but not the good kind. The state has the fastest growing childhood poverty rate in the country for the third year in a row. The data was released in a new report from the non-partisan Colorado Children’s Campaign. Bente Birkeland takes a look behind the numbers.

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Several hundred people who’ve been living in Colorado Springs’ parks will soon have to find a new address. That’s after, as the Gazette reports, the city council officially passed an ordinance yesterday to ban camping on city property. The city’s charities and police department have worked for months to get ready for the change. Continue Reading

Round-Up

On October 20, 2009 By

Colorado School of Mines holds an oil shale symposium…Colorado lawmakers consider proposals aimed at reducing poverty…and, unionized grocery workers and Safeway head back to the bargaining table.

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A state task force aimed at cutting poverty in half over the next decade held it’s first working meeting at the state capitol on Monday. Lawmakers were briefed on different ways to measure poverty and combat it. Bente Birkeland reports from Denver.

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Round-Up

On July 27, 2009 By

A committee meets for the first time to study poverty in Colorado…another committee looks at waste tires…a federal agency plans to look into phone subsidies…and, the Department of Energy and Bureau of Land Management extends a public comment period for studying where to build solar power plants.

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Round-Up

On June 17, 2009 By

Colorado holds the highest growth rate for children living in poverty…Gov. Bill Ritter attends the Western Governors’ Association meetings…a subcommittee approves extending a spending ban on the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site…and, Representative Betsy Markey testifies for wildfire mitigation.

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News

AP
March 2, 2015 | NPR · Nina Pham, 26, who contracted Ebola after caring for a patient, tells the Dallas Morning News that she will file a lawsuit Monday charging the hospital in Dallas lacked proper training and equipment.
 

Hanna Barczyk for NPR
March 2, 2015 | NPR · People with household incomes of less than $25,000 a year say in a new poll that the lack of cash really hurts their health. Low-quality food and dangerous housing are two reasons why.
 

Alyson Hurt/NPR
March 2, 2015 | NPR · Health is not just about trips to the doctor, according to a poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. Housing, stress and abuse are factors.
 

Arts & Life

CBS
March 1, 2015 | NPR · CBS’ new cop show Battle Creek is based on a 12-year-old script by Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan. It’s among three new network shows that aim to reinvent old TV concepts.
 

Paramount Pictures
March 1, 2015 | NPR · The man behind the look of Selma and A Most Violent Year talks about depicting violence, participating in history and being a black cinematographer in Hollywood.
 

AFP/Getty Images
March 1, 2015 | NPR · In his novel She Will Build Him a City, Raj Kamal Jha weaves the reality he sees as a journalist in New Delhi — where many gravitate looking for a better future — into a fictional, magical world.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
March 1, 2015 | NPR · Binary thinkers beware: If you’re the type who’s uncomfortable with contradiction, or would rather deal in stereotypes than nuance, then rapper Heems and his new album are not for you.
 

Courtesy of the artist
March 1, 2015 | NPR · Sosa’s songs are saturated with the beauty and power of West African music dedicated to Yoruba deities. And yet an unmistakable reverence for jazz pervades every note.
 

Courtesy of the artist
March 1, 2015 | NPR · He wanted to be the behind-the-scenes guy, not the star. But backed by strings, choirs, horns and the house band of his own label, White made a second album that isn’t different — just better.
 

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