Colorado earned bragging rights yesterday, but not the good kind. The state has the fastest growing childhood poverty rate in the country for the third year in a row. The data was released in a new report from the non-partisan Colorado Children’s Campaign. Bente Birkeland takes a look behind the numbers.

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Several hundred people who’ve been living in Colorado Springs’ parks will soon have to find a new address. That’s after, as the Gazette reports, the city council officially passed an ordinance yesterday to ban camping on city property. The city’s charities and police department have worked for months to get ready for the change. Continue Reading

Round-Up

On October 20, 2009 By

Colorado School of Mines holds an oil shale symposium…Colorado lawmakers consider proposals aimed at reducing poverty…and, unionized grocery workers and Safeway head back to the bargaining table.

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A state task force aimed at cutting poverty in half over the next decade held it’s first working meeting at the state capitol on Monday. Lawmakers were briefed on different ways to measure poverty and combat it. Bente Birkeland reports from Denver.

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Round-Up

On July 27, 2009 By

A committee meets for the first time to study poverty in Colorado…another committee looks at waste tires…a federal agency plans to look into phone subsidies…and, the Department of Energy and Bureau of Land Management extends a public comment period for studying where to build solar power plants.

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Round-Up

On June 17, 2009 By

Colorado holds the highest growth rate for children living in poverty…Gov. Bill Ritter attends the Western Governors’ Association meetings…a subcommittee approves extending a spending ban on the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site…and, Representative Betsy Markey testifies for wildfire mitigation.

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News

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