Researchers are developing a technology that could draw carbon dioxide directly out of the air. It’s very expensive now, but it works, and one company is already trying to identify a market for all that captured greenhouse gas.

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In the U.S., more prospective parents seek to adopt white and mixed race children than black children. As a result, many agencies levy lower fees to make it easier for parents to adopt from among the large numbers of black children waiting for placement.

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The Supreme Court’s decision could shape the future of same-sex marriage in the country.

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Critics contend that by striking down a key section of the Voting Rights Act, the Supreme Court scrapped Congress’ means of determining which jurisdictions required pre-clearance. Voting-rights advocates expect that states and other jurisdictions will now enact voter ID laws that had previously faced scrutiny.

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The high court is considering challenges to the federal Defense of Marriage Act and a voter-backed law banning gay marriage in California. The outcome of the two cases could shape the future of same-sex marriage in the country.

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The Senate has taken another step toward approving a sweeping immigration overhaul, as the legislation passed an essential test Monday evening. By a vote of 67-27, the chamber voted to include an amendment on border security to the final bill, and to avoid a filibuster.

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Donation after cardiac death involves removing organs minutes after life-support has been stopped for patients who still have at least some brain activity. Is that enough time to make sure a person won’t recover?

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For some, it’s a symbol of America’s might. For others, it’s a frightening weapon of warfare. For many target-shooting hobbyists, it’s “the Mr. Potato Head of firearms” — customizable to fit each individual. And it’s all part of what is now a nearly billion-dollar business in military-style weapons.

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It was widely reported that he would fly from Moscow to Havana on Monday. But he apparently did not board that flight. Just where Snowden is headed isn’t known for sure, but it’s thought that his final destination will be Ecuador.

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From savoring a morning coffee to lighting a candle each night, people employ rituals all over the world. NPR science correspondent Shankar Vedantam speaks with behavior scientist Francesca Gino and Slate columnist William Saletan about the role of rituals in human life.

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A growing number of cities are using surveillance cameras in the hope of fighting crime, but all that video is almost useless without powerful search tools to sort the material. The municipal camera trend is proving to be big business for companies that design video analytics software.

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The U.S. military said in January that it will end its front-line combat exclusion for women; the shift means that women could join elite forces such as the Army Rangers and Navy SEALs in the next three years.

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Mary Louise Kelly used to cover national security for NPR, but lately she’s turned her attention to fiction. Her new novel, Anonymous Sources, draws on Kelly’s own reporting experiences, including things she couldn’t say when she was a journalist.

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President Obama says federal judges have been “overseeing” the recently exposed government surveillance programs. But few, if any, experts in the Bush or Obama administrations believe that the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court has the enforcement teeth it once had.

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An enterprising carpenter and a creative puppeteer teamed up on a do-it-yourself project to build a mechanical hand for a little boy. They created an inexpensive prosthetic and published their designs on the Internet. So far, over 100 children have been outfitted.

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In Latin America, it’s said the only part of a prison the guards control is the gate, leaving convicts to fend for themselves. The inmate boss of one prison takes NPR’s Steve Inskeep on a tour.

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On June 11, 1963, Gov. George Wallace stood at the University of Alabama to block two black students attempting to cross the color line and register for classes. That event forever associated him with segregation. His daughter is trying to shake that association, and is using her voice to promote healing.

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Nearly one in four African Americans tell pollsters they’re having a hard time paying for needed prescription medicine. One in three say they struggled to pay bills from hospitals or doctors last year.

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A self-described mediocre student, Snowden says his computer skills landed him a job with the CIA. It was there, he says, that he became convinced that surveillance programs are violating Americans’ rights to privacy. Now, he’s stepped forward to say he leaked secrets about those programs.

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With its upcoming decisions on same-sex marriage, the U.S. Supreme Court faces the same question that Margaret Marshall faced a decade ago as Massachusetts’ chief justice. Marshall says she had little idea that the decision she wrote legalizing gay marriage would be groundbreaking.

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The news that the nation’s spy agencies have been collecting phone records has been followed by word that they’re also gathering up reams of information from the servers of major Internet and tech companies.

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The Affordable Care Act, which has become known as Obamacare, will require small businesses with 50 or more employees to offer health care coverage to their workers. Some have suggested that could be discouraging hiring by small businesses.

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President Obama has named a former journalist and activist to represent him at the United Nations. If confirmed, Samantha Power will replace Ambassador Susan Rice, who is returning to the White House to become national security adviser. Power’s supporters see her as a voice of conscience in the Obama administration, an advocate for humanitarian interventions.

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