For the last three years, NPR’s Michele Norris has asked people to share their six-word stories about race and cultural identity. The confrontation in Sanford, Fla., has been a running thread in the inbox of the Race Card Project since Trayvon Martin was shot and killed in 2012.

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As a kid, Randolph always saw himself as a steel-guitar rock star. Now, the 33-year-old frontman has released a soulful new album with a twist on gospel music.

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In 2007, 4-year-old Faith Marr was diagnosed with a rare bone cancer. Doctors were uncertain about her chances of survival. Faith and her father, Jerris, talk about how their bond grew stronger during hospital stays when he would “tattoo” her favorite things on her skin and scars.

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Mary Hamilton, a field secretary for the Congress of Racial Equality, was arrested at an Alabama protest and refused to answer the judge unless he called her “Miss.” It was custom for white people to get honorifics, but black people were called by first names.

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The history of the Medicare drug law, and Medicare itself, suggests that rough launches of health expansions don’t necessarily signal a lasting failure. So, proponents say, even a misfire of the health exchanges wouldn’t doom the federal overhaul.

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The nonagenarian artist recently received the National Medal of Arts, and museums around the world are still celebrating his May birthday. The Phillips Collection, in Washington, D.C., is displaying seven “exuberant” pieces: layered or lined-up canvases painted in bold, solid colors.

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A trade group for Catholic hospitals says a new Obama administration policy on birth control is just fine. That’s in sharp contrast to the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, which continues to battle against the policy, which exempts churches, synagogues and mosques, but requires other institutions run by religious organizations to cover birth control under employees’ health insurance.

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The chicken-size sage grouse is as much a part of America’s Western range as antelopes and cowboys. The birds nest beneath sagebrush, and as it disappears, so do the grouse. Biologists hope to protect the bird without starting a 21st century range war.

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Thousands of firefighters are gathered in Prescott, Ariz., today to honor the Granite Mountain Hotshots, the 19 firefighters who were killed by a wildfire on Sunday, June 30. The speakers included Vice President Joe Biden, who said, “All men are created equal. But then, a few became firefighters.”

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Across the corn belt, farmers are pulling out all the stops in their war the corn rootworm. They’re returning to chemical pesticides, because the weapons of biotechnology — inserted genes that are supposed to kill the rootworm — aren’t working so well anymore.

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The wearable technology, which is being tested by a select group of users, was used to record an arrest on the Jersey Shore. The incident raises questions about citizen journalism and the limits of privacy in public.

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U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on a free-trade deal that could create thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in new trade. But there are deep-seated differences that may make it difficult to reach an accord. Among the most contentious: agriculture, and whether genetically modified crops grown in the U.S. will be welcome in Europe.

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Video reports show smoke billowing from Flight 214 and it appears to have broken into at least two large pieces. Images from the scene also show many passengers walking away from the crippled jet.

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The Muslim Brotherhood calls for a “day of rage.” The army moves to respond. Egyptians fear there could be violent clashes as the repercussions of President Mohammed Morsi’s ouster continue to be felt.

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Paul and James Bizzaro spent their childhoods living in a house right behind the Statue of Liberty. Their family moved to Liberty Island 75 years ago, not long after their father became a guard at the statue. Lady Liberty was their playground. And their father kept her torch lit for 36 years.

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Photographer Ty Wright set out to see whether Nevada’s Route 50 is really the loneliest road. And if so, who lives there?

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Military chief Abdel Fattah El Sissi says that Mohammed Morsi is out as president and the country’s constitution has been suspended. Egypt’s chief justice will hold power during the transitional period and set a date for early presidential elections.

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A family copes with tuberculosis in a place where a child infected with the illness may be shunned. Nurses are working hard to bring clean air and clear information to every home and every generation.

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The 19 firefighters killed in Arizona Sunday represented the worst loss for their profession since Sept. 11, 2001. The number of firefighters killed in the line of duty has been in decline, but departments are seeking innovative ways to offer support in times of grief.

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Many violent crimes are hastily planned and poorly considered, researchers at the University of Chicago’s Crime Lab find. Training troubled teens to slow down and put a more benign spin on what they imagine the other guy is thinking significantly reduced the kids’ likelihood of committing a crime.

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Nearly all of the firefighters who died were part of the Granite Mountain Hotshots, an elite group based in Prescott, Ariz. The Yarnell Hill Fire has destroyed an estimated 200 homes since it began Friday.

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Synthetic biologist Jay Keasling has already taught yeast to make the leading anti-malarial drug. His next project takes the technology a step further, using yeast to turn plant waste into diesel — and maybe gasoline and jet fuel, too.

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NASA has a plan to fend off giant asteroids, but what about tsunamis, earthquakes, storms that last 45 days and mammoth floods? Earth scientists say science-based strategies can help communities prepare for the worst of the worst.

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