[slideshow id=11] Boulder’s annual International Film Festival wrapped up over the weekend, with films on topics ranging from the Dalai Lama to Jean Claude Van Damme. One of the films screened at the festival was Come Back to Sudan, about Sudanese refugees living in Colorado who make a journey back to their homeland. Colorado College […]

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Round-up

On January 30, 2009 By

Rocky Mountain News employees hold a candlelight vigil, and a Colorado man faces federal charges.

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In the sagging economy, many media outlets are cutting jobs and laying off reporters, and Colorado’s not immune. The most recent newspaper casualty happened on Tuesday when the Pueblo Chieftain told its veteran state capitol reporter that he would be out of a job at the end of the current legislative session. Bente […]

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The Governor’s office announced millions of dollars in proposed budget cuts to a broad range of key programs. This comes in response to a projected 600 million dollar budget shortfall Colorado faces this year. Bente Birkeland discusses the cuts with statehouse reporters at the capitol as part of our weekly capitol conversation series.

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Old Colorado City resident Dave Hughes is an Army veteran, great-grandfather, and an internet pioneer. For today’s “Citizen Report,” Hughes shares his thoughts on this particular experiment in media convergence.

(The “Citizen Report” is a collaboration between the Colorado Springs Gazette and KRCC. More information is available at the YourHub link at Continue Reading

Round-up

On January 14, 2009 By

A major transportation package in Colorado’s General Assembly, Representative Salazar (D) votes for S-CHIP expansion, and the Rocky Mountain News gets an ultimatum.

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Today marks the beginning of the “Citizen Report,” a collaborative effort between the Colorado Springs Gazette and KRCC. Drawing from submissions to the YourHub pages at ColoradoSprings.com, citizen journalists now have the opportunity to share their work over the air in addition to appearing in print.

This inaugural edition of […]

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News

Reuters/Landov
July 4, 2015 | NPR · The new champion came in second last year in the annual contest put on by Nathan’s Famous Hot Dogs, besting eight-time champ Joey “Jaws” Chestnut by 2 dogs.
 

EPA/Landov
July 4, 2015 | NPR · Beji Caid Essebsi’s office says the president needs the expanded powers to deal with extremists following the attack in Sousse that killed 38 foreign tourists.
 

July 4, 2015 | NPR · He invented the pompom and the iconic “Herkie jump” that remains a staple of cheering squads to this day. And his National Cheerleading Association trains 150,000 cheerleaders a year.
 

Arts & Life

NPR
July 4, 2015 | NPR · Carolina de Robertis’ new novel God of Tango centers on a 17-year-old widow, recently arrived from Italy with little besides a violin. It’s Argentina, 1913 — and a magical new music fills the barrios.
 

July 4, 2015 | NPR · Elizabeth Wiley, chef-owner of two top Dayton, Ohio, restaurants, goes off-menu to cook beer-braised turkey thighs in her home kitchen.
 

July 4, 2015 | NPR · Former president Jimmy Carter was one of the youngest ex-presidents ever when he left office in 1981. His new memoir, A Full Life, looks back at his years of public service, in and out of office.
 

Music

TNS /Landov
July 4, 2015 | NPR · The Grateful Dead play their final shows at Chicago’s Soldier Field this July 4 weekend. NPR’s Eric Westervelt reflects on how the Dead disrupted the musical and business norms of the industry.
 

Courtesy of the artist
July 4, 2015 | NPR · He’s from New York City; she’s from rural Tennessee. But the husband and wife, each known for backing up roots music’s biggest stars, make it work on their new album.
 

July 3, 2015 | NPR · NPR’s favorite albums of the year so far range from hip-hop to Latin music.
 

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