[slideshow id=11] Boulder’s annual International Film Festival wrapped up over the weekend, with films on topics ranging from the Dalai Lama to Jean Claude Van Damme. One of the films screened at the festival was Come Back to Sudan, about Sudanese refugees living in Colorado who make a journey back to their homeland. Colorado College [...]

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Round-up

On January 30, 2009 By

Rocky Mountain News employees hold a candlelight vigil, and a Colorado man faces federal charges.

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In the sagging economy, many media outlets are cutting jobs and laying off reporters, and Colorado’s not immune. The most recent newspaper casualty happened on Tuesday when the Pueblo Chieftain told its veteran state capitol reporter that he would be out of a job at the end of the current legislative session. Bente [...]

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The Governor’s office announced millions of dollars in proposed budget cuts to a broad range of key programs. This comes in response to a projected 600 million dollar budget shortfall Colorado faces this year. Bente Birkeland discusses the cuts with statehouse reporters at the capitol as part of our weekly capitol conversation series.

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Old Colorado City resident Dave Hughes is an Army veteran, great-grandfather, and an internet pioneer. For today’s “Citizen Report,” Hughes shares his thoughts on this particular experiment in media convergence.

(The “Citizen Report” is a collaboration between the Colorado Springs Gazette and KRCC. More information is available at the YourHub link at Continue Reading

Round-up

On January 14, 2009 By

A major transportation package in Colorado’s General Assembly, Representative Salazar (D) votes for S-CHIP expansion, and the Rocky Mountain News gets an ultimatum.

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Today marks the beginning of the “Citizen Report,” a collaborative effort between the Colorado Springs Gazette and KRCC. Drawing from submissions to the YourHub pages at ColoradoSprings.com, citizen journalists now have the opportunity to share their work over the air in addition to appearing in print.

This inaugural edition of [...]

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News

October 25, 2014 | NPR · The woman was isolated Friday as she returned from treating Ebola patients in West Africa. She had no symptoms of the disease; she developed a fever and was taken to a nearby hospital.
 

October 25, 2014 | NPR · Peter Hubbard is one of 20 volunteers in a human safety test of an experimental Ebola vaccine. He tells NPR’s Scott Simon about why he signed up and how he has been feeling.
 

October 25, 2014 | NPR · How strong is the U.S.-Turkey alliance against the Islamic State? NPR’s Scott Simon speaks with former U.S. Ambassador to Turkey, Francis Ricciardone.
 

Arts & Life

Riverhead
October 25, 2014 | NPR · Farah’s latest is called Hiding in Plain Sight. It’s the story of Bella, a Somali photographer living in Rome who gets drawn into the lives of her niece and nephew after her half-brother is killed.
 

October 25, 2014 | NPR · Shakespeare’s Hamlet has been turned into a Bollywood film, but this time, the story is set in Indian-controlled Kashmir. NPR’s Scott Simon talks to screenwriter Basharat Peer.
 

October 25, 2014 | NPR · Composer John Mauceri’s latest album is filled with renditions of the most-chilling music from Alfred Hitchcock’s films. He talks with NPR’s Scott Simon.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
October 25, 2014 | NPR · Christmas yields dozens of holiday albums each year. But, “Monster Mash” aside, what of Halloween?
 

NPR Starff
October 25, 2014 | NPR · The Danish String Quartet doesn’t live on Brahms and Beethoven alone. Watch the versatile group play Danish folk tunes, from centuries-old Fanø wedding dances to traditional Roskilde reels.
 

October 25, 2014 | NPR · The oratorio is a time-honored way for classical composers to tell a big story. Composer Ted Hearne thinks so too. His new oratorio, The Source, takes on the story of Chelsea Manning and WikiLeaks.
 

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