If you’re like us and believe that the Pikes Peak Region has an amazing past ahead of us, then you’ll be interested in attending some or all of the one-day Regional History Symposium. Sponsored by Special Collections at the Pikes Peak Library District, the Pikes Peak Library District Foundation, and The Colorado Springs [...]

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It’s DAY TWO of the fund drive and we’re rolling out some of our greatest hits. We pride ourselves in bringing you pieces like this investigation into the proper pronunciation of “Buena Vista.” Considering our regional culture from odd and unusual perspectives is our specialty. If you appreciate pieces like this we hope you’ll renew [...]

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(“Demolition of the Alta Vista Hotel on 118 North Cascade Avenue”, 1963. Photograph by by Helen and James McCaffery. Courtesy of Special Collections, Pikes Peak Library District. Image number 266-10006.)

If you follow The Big Something, then you know that we like to practice a form of process journalism that involves [...]

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How the West Was Weird

On March 29, 2010 By

This piece originally ran as “Our (Spaghetti) Western Town” last September. It’s still among The Big Something posts with the most comments. Like the “Then and Now: Portraits of Urban Renwal” post we ran earlier this month, it seems have spoken to the gulf between how we see ourselves and how we’d like [...]

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(Pikes Peak at night. Copyright Dr. Travis Rector)

Surprise. Colorado Springs has once again become the focus of a largely negative national media maelstrom surrounding this article by Michael Booth in the Denver Post, which has made a number of rounds on the internet now. Of course, not all of [...]

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News

July 27, 2014 | NPR · Anne Barnard from The New York Times talks with NPR’s Eric Westervelt about the differences between the current explosion of violence in Gaza and previous ones.
 

July 27, 2014 | NPR · Israel and Hamas carried out a rhetorical battle Sunday over the fate of dueling offers to extend a ceasefire. In the end, the fighting resumed after Saturday’s 12-hour truce. Israel vowed to continue its military campaign, targeting tunnels along the border. Wary Gazans prepared as best they could for the feast that marks the end of Ramadan.
 

July 27, 2014 | NPR · Bloodshed is escalating in Baghdad as the militant group known as the Islamic State seeks to expand its territory in Iraq. NPR’s Eric Westervelt talks to reporter Alice Fordham in Erbil about life under the rule of the radical Islamic group.
 

Arts & Life

AP
July 27, 2014 | NPR · In the Land of Love and Drowning, the islands are a magical setting for three generations of one family living through the modern history of the territory as it passes from Danish to American hands.
 

Courtesy of Silverstone Auction
July 27, 2014 | NPR · The Harrier Jump Jet is known for vertical take-offs and landings. It also has an accident-prone track record, but that didn’t dissuade one pilot from buying his dream plane.
 

July 27, 2014 | NPR · An experiment at a new production of Carmen has many wondering how technology will affect operagoers’ experience. NPR’s Arun Rath talks to Kim Witman, director of the Wolf Trap Opera.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
July 27, 2014 | NPR · Inspired by the birth of a child and a new career, Austin Lunn’s triumphant, ebullient new album as Panopticon steps outside his curveball mixture of metal and American folk.
 

Courtesy of the artist
July 27, 2014 | NPR · This English band’s ideas move fast — riffs erupt only to disappear just as quickly. It’s as though they’re chasing super-concentrated bursts of bliss that gather into epic music.
 

Courtesy of the artist
July 27, 2014 | NPR · This singer-songwriter has been through hard times — but you wouldn’t know it from his new album. It blossoms with inventive turns of phrase, quiet affection and a peculiar sweetness.
 

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