Ludlow, Part 3

On September 17, 2011 By

Click the green play button to listen:

Click HERE to listen to Part 1.

Click HERE to listen to Part 2.

The presentation was produced by Noel Black with assistance from Craig Richardson for KRCC. Music is by Uncle Woody Sullender from the Free Music Archive. Tune in [...]

Continue Reading

Van Briggle Building Up Close

On September 14, 2011 By

Designed by Dutch architect Nicolaas van den Arend, the Van Briggle Pottery building at the corner of Uintah and Glen Avenue is a spectacular example of Flemish farmouse/Arts and Crafts styles and has a wide array of Van Briggle tiles and pottery incorporated into the structure, which were once meant to advertise the signature [...]

Continue Reading

Charles and Bee

On September 8, 2011 By


In 1970, under the leadership of Bee Vradenburg, the Colorado Springs Symphony hired Charles Ansbacher as its new conductor and music director. At that time the symphony was nary a glimmer of what it would become with Vradenburg and Ansbacher at the helm over the next 20 years. This Friday, a free [...]

Continue Reading

We’re very pleased to announce that, after many months of recording and editing, our collaboration with Colorado College Professor and Colorado Poet Laureate David Mason will come to fruition this Saturday, September 3 at 1 p.m. on KRCC as we air the first installment of Ludlow. An epic verse-novel about the union [...]

Continue Reading

(all photos in this slide show by John Sondericker)

While we’ll admit that we’re not the biggest professional sports fans ever invented, we were admittedly taken with some of the excitement surrounding the first annual USA Pro Cycling Challenge, which ended in Denver yesterday with a win for American Levi Leipheimer. [...]

Continue Reading

If you ever find your mind wondering about the histories of some of the neat old buildings you encounter whilst wandering about town, you may find those pangs of wonderment satiated in this third edition of Brief Histories of Beautiful Buildings. Once again, Tim Scanlon gently guides us through Colorado Springs’ past to uncover the [...]

Continue Reading

SoCO Odyssey, Part II

On August 10, 2011 By

In Part II of our end-of-summer road trip finale we travel through the San Luis Valley in search of people for whom the past is the future. (If you missed Part I yesterday, it’s HERE.

Continue Reading

If you missed Western Skies this past weekend, then you missed the grand finale of our summer road trip series–a long radio piece Craig Richardson and I put together about a 3-day road trip in which we met some of our amazing neighbors in the outer reaches of the KRCC listening area. We’ve [...]

Continue Reading

Uniquely Colorado

On August 8, 2011 By

In our latest installment of Western Skies, we set out across Colorado to explore our backyard with the hope of discovering that which defines the unique identity of our state. If you missed yesterday’s broadcast of Western Skies, or if you haven’t had a chance to view the slide shows that accompany the [...]

Continue Reading

If you follow our daily Pikes Peak Library District Historic Photo of the Day feature, there’s no doubt you’ve not only seen, but perhaps have been captivated by a few of the photographs by former Gazette Telegraph photographer Stan Payne. The Library’s own Jamey Hastings has produced a short documentary about the man who [...]

Continue Reading

Tim Scanlon, retired Colorado Springs city employee who worked in support of the Historic Preservation Board, shares a brief history of a few of Colorado Springs’ most notable historic buildings. If you missed the first part in this series, you can view it by clicking HERE.


(“The Exchange National Bank” photographer [...]

Continue Reading


If one man is synonymous with the Colorado Rockies, it is Robert Ormes. Despite his profession as an English teacher at the Fountain Valley School and later as an English Professor at Colorado College, Ormes is most widely known for his contributions to Colorado Mountaineering via the publication of A Guide to [...]

Continue Reading

You’ve doubtless driven by them thousands of times without paying them much mind. The Japanese garden that rests in the median on Nevada Avenue between the YMCA and Acacia park, or the Nuevo Casas Grandes mural on on Tejon street. These are symbols of the bonds our community has with cities around the [...]

Continue Reading

This 4th of July marked the 120th anniversary of The Independence Mine claim that made Winfield Scott Stratton one of the wealthiest gold barons in history. But as local historian Richard Marold recounts in this audio slide show, Winfield Scott Stratton wasn’t your typical gold baron, and much of his legacy still stands in [...]

Continue Reading

One of the most pervasive notions of American cultural identity is that of the Old West and the myth of the cowboy. This month we stick a magnifying glass up to those notions to see where they originate, and where they continue to resonate.

You can listen to the full episode, or download [...]

Continue Reading

In the late 19th and early 20th century, a few names dominate the history of Colorado Springs, especially with regard to the gold mines of Cripple Creek. The spectacular wealth of Spencer Penrose, Winfield Scott Stratton and Jumpin’ Jimmy Burns tends to overshadow the stories of the men who worked one or two levels [...]

Continue Reading

Big Something intern Ruby Kimberly put together this look back at Drop City—frequently cited as the first artist/hippy commune—in Trinidad, Colorado. Kimberly writes:

In passing through the region surrounding Trinidad, CO today, one encounters a vast expanse of arid and sparsely populated land where, for a brief moment in the 1960s and 70s, became [...]

Continue Reading

Photographers, filmmakers, fans of the like, and history buffs who haven’t already registered for this Saturday’s 8th Annual Regional Pikes Peak History Symposium presented and hosted by Special Collections at the Pikes Peak Library District will be sad to know that it’s sold out. The good news is that you can [...]

Continue Reading

It’s hard to believe that KRCC is now 60 years old (that’s 20 years older than NPR), making it the first educational radio station in the state of Colorado. It takes a lot of community dedication and commitment to keep any institution going for this long. From its beginnings, KRCC has had a rare [...]

Continue Reading

Tesla Talk

Local author and historian Richard Marold is probably best known for his impersonations of local gold baron Winfield Scott Stratton, but he stopped by the station recently to channel the great inventor Nikola Tesla who built a laboratory in Colorado Springs in 1899 to conduct experiments in wireless telegraphy and [...]

Continue Reading

Artist and Colorado College graduate Margaret Kilgallen died tragically at age 33 in 2001, just as her career was taking off and only three weeks after the birth of of her daughter Asha with artist Barry McGee, aka Twist.

Kilgallen got her BFA in 1989 at CC where she studied letterpress with [...]

Continue Reading

The Old North End of Colorado Springs is a treasure trove of turn-of-the-20th-Century architectural gems that local authors Jennifer Wendler Lovell and Robert Loevy have researched and documented in their new book Exploring the Old North End of Colorado Springs – A Guide to its History and Architecture.

We spoke with them about [...]

Continue Reading

In this second installment of our Historic Preservation Month series in collaboration with the Colorado Springs Historic Preservation Alliance we speak with Tim Scanlon, retired Colorado Springs city employee who worked in support of the Historic Preservation Board. Scanlon will lead a Central Downtown Walking Tour of historic downtown buildings this Sunday, May 15 [...]

Continue Reading

News

Wikimedia Commons
September 30, 2014 | NPR · Applying to the program for immigrants illegally brought to the U.S. as children provides a work permit and prevents deportation, but costs $465. Mexico is helping some of its citizens with that cost.
 

AP
September 30, 2014 | NPR · Unfortunately for sports fans, the rules aren’t expected to change much, as the NFL could still negotiate blackout rules through contracts with broadcasters. It does, however, end FCC protection.
 

NPR
September 30, 2014 | NPR · If a suspect threatens officers, police say they have a right to defend themselves. But a Justice Department report said the police in Albuquerque have used force unnecessarily; two ex-officers agree.
 

Arts & Life

September 30, 2014 | NPR · Tess Taylor reviews Christian Wiman’s new collection of poems, “Once in the West.”
 

September 30, 2014 | NPR · Rachel Martin talks to food writer Mark Bittman about his new cookbook, “How to Cook Everything Fast,” which thumbs its nose at the French tradition of having ingredients prepped before you cook.
 

September 30, 2014 | NPR · Matt Bai says that while voters have always cared about candidates’ characters, some news used to be off limits. His new book looks at Gary Hart’s 1987 affair that destroyed his political ambitions.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
September 30, 2014 | NPR · Two new albums, a solo effort and a collaboration with the band 3RDEYEGIRL, mark Prince’s return to the studio. Tom Moon says that only one fully captures what an explosive performer he can still be.
 

AFP/Getty Images
September 30, 2014 | NPR · The label has become a crucial ambassador, introducing many world-music artists to American fans. Hear 10 songs from across Nonesuch’s remarkable 50-year history.
 

Courtesy of the artists
September 30, 2014 | NPR · On this week’s All Songs: We share great new electronic music from Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’ unsettling Gone Girl soundtrack, Thom Yorke and Aphex Twin, plus new music from Robert Plant and more.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab