What started as an innocuous visit to the public library resulted in a quest of discovery for Big Something interns Brian Wray and Jake Brownell. You see, they came upon a document titled “Secret Societies of Colorado Springs.” Armed with scant details they endeavored upon a course of action to uncover the truth about these [...]

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Interview with Chuck Snow about the Taylor Barn

If you’ve ever driven through the intersection at Templeton Gap and Fillmore in Colorado Springs, then you probably remember the inspirational murals and mules that lived at the Taylor Barn. Today on the Big Something Radio Program, Noel Black interviews local musician and self-described curmudgeon [...]

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A little while ago, one of our readers sent us a series of photos of what remains of the old Cheyenne Mountain Lodge (it’s not open the public and we certainly discourage anyone from trespassing, on account of us being responsible members of society), aka The Honeymoon Lodge, one of Spencer Penrose’s many opulent [...]

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This past weekend’s Pikes Peak International Hill Climb marked its 90th running. Now the second oldest car race in the country, it began in 1916 when cars were decidedly more primitive. This quick slide show from the Pikes Peak Library District’s Digital Photo Archive (most of which are from Stewart’s Commercial Photography) gives [...]

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Citizens Project was created 20 years ago in response to Colorado’s Amendment 2 and the climate that made its passage possible. Executive Director Kristy Milligan came by to talk about the mission of the organization and a few of the many ways that Citizens Project has contributed to civilizing Colorado Springs.

The 20th Anniversary [...]

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In 1894, upon the site of the present-day intersection of Austin Bluffs and Academy, Colorado’s Adjutant General, Thomas J. Tarsney was perhaps the last man to be tarred and feathered in the state of Colorado. Local historian Richard Marold tells the tale:

Tarsney Tarred and Feathered in Colorado Springs

Richard Marold is a [...]

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The list of famous movie stars born in Colorado Springs is a fairly short one. However short the list is, it is a rather impressive one if for no other reason than it contains the name of one of the first major stars of the silver screen: Mr. Lon Chaney. From playing [...]

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(Click on the image above to begin the slideshow)

While the very names Cripple Creek and Victor still evoke the history, romance and legend of one of the biggest gold booms in America, few people outside the area are aware that there’s still a major mining operation at the Cripple Creek & Victor Mine, [...]

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Few rags-to-riches stories are as American as the story of Winfield Scott Stratton. His name now adorns street signs, buildings and parks throughout the Pikes Peak Region, but the story (embellished as it may be by this reading from Marshall Sprague’s Money Mountain: The Story of Cripple Creek Gold) of just how hard [...]

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Medical practice in the early days of Colorado Springs wasn’t necessarily what was portrayed on the 1990′s CBS costume drama, Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman – historian Richard Marold brings us this historical report:
Pioneering Medicine: A Day in the Life of Dr. Charles Fox Gardiner

Richard Marold is a local historian who [...]

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Historian Richard Marold takes us back to baseball’s roots in Colorado Springs from the birth of the Millionaires in 1902 to the return of the Sky Sox in 1988.

The History of Baseball in Colorado Springs

Richard Marold is a local historian who works as a Chautauquan and portrays Winfield Scott Stratton, Franklin [...]

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We invited local historian and Colorado Springs native Richard Marold to reminisce about his youth spent in the Pikes Peak region.  Learn more about the Great Bunny Slaughter of 1939, the Cheyenne Mountain School Glider, being replaced by a machine and much, much more.

You can learn a little more about Cheyenne Mountain School [...]

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In the third and final part of our series of the history of Colorado Springs’ most-used park, Judith Rice-Jones unveils the history of Monument Valley Park following the devastating Memorial Day flood of 1935 and the opportunities that exist for bettering the amenity. If you missed Part I and II of this series, you [...]

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Yesterday marked the 80th Anniversary of the last day of streetcar service in Colorado Springs, April 30, 1932. Here are two pieces from the archives that tell the story of the golden days of public transportation in the shadow of Pikes Peak.

In this slide show of images from the Pikes Peak Library [...]

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This 1957 Chevy truck commercial was shot by Alexander Film Company on the declivities of Pikes Peak. At first it seems that this might be nothing more than a routine drive up the Pikes Peak Highway in an attempt to impress the less savvy of their would-be customers with the dramatic backdrops offered [...]

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 This Friday at 5:30 p.m., the Fine Arts Center will unveil the long-awaited mural by Eric Bransby, the last living descendant of the Broadmoor Academy/Fine Arts Center school masters including Thomas Hart Benton, Boardman Robinson and Jean Charlot. Working in a style that originated with the social realists of the new deal, but with [...]

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In this, our second installment of our series of the history of Colorado Springs’ most-used park, Judith Rice-Jones unveils the history of Monument Valley Park prior to the devastating Memorial Day flood of 1935. If you missed Part I of this series, you may view it HERE. More to come in the following weeks!
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Local historian Judith Rice-Jones takes us on a brief history tour of the early days of parks in Colorado Springs.

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Colorado Springs historian, Judith Rice-Jones, guides us through the early days of Colorado Springs and William Jackson Palmer’s vision of Monument Valley Park. Rice-Jones takes us from Pike’s impressions of the region up to Palmer’s dream for the 2-mile linear park running through the center of Colorado Springs. This is the first part in our [...]

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All works in this slide show are from the Collection of Millie Yawn unless otherwise noted.

If you haven’t yet seen it, don’t miss this last chance to catch the retrospective of artwork by the late Louis Cicotello at the Gallery of Contemporary Art at UCCS (complete details HERE), a local artist and teacher [...]

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(All photographs by Michael Myers except where indicated in the captions)

We in El Paso County have lots of incredible open space and, thanks to TOPS and the Trails and Open Space Coalition (TOSC), it may be our greatest treasure and our most enduring legacy. Red Rock Canyon and [...]

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Possibly the most photographed spot in the entire Garden of the Gods, Balanced Rock’s place as a backdrop in tourist photographs for more than a hundred years gives it a status worthy of “the most photographed barn in America” from Don DeLillo’s satirical novel White Noise: “No one sees the barn. Once you’ve seen the [...]

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On Memorial Day, 1935, Colorado Springs suffered its greatest natural disaster when a series of thunderstorms swelled and then burst through the banks of Monument and Fountain creeks. All but one bridge spanning the creek were destroyed, not to mention the many houses and businesses that lay within the flood plain. We used the [...]

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