In Memoriam, 2010

On December 21, 2010 By

As the year comes to a close, we remember some of the many luminous individuals no longer with us who made our community a better place to live.

Dr. Ted Eastburn, former City Council member, open Space advocate, and affordable healthcare advocate:

Click HERE to read Kathryn Eastburn’s rememberance.

Bo [...]

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The Scoop on Brian Nemeth

On December 13, 2010 By

If you’ve ever walked more than half-a-block through downtown Colorado Springs in the past decade, you’ve likely been approached (or accosted) by one of Colorado Springs’ greatest characters: Brian Nemeth. A self-styled poet and aspiring news anchor, Nemeth relentlessly peddles his raunchy and frequently belligerent poems and opinions as one-sheet photocopied handouts for a [...]

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Stratton's Streetcars

On November 23, 2010 By

In this slide show of images from the Pikes Peak Library District’s Digital Photography Archive with text by Marshall Sprague from his history of the region, “Newport in the Rockies” (read by Craig Richardson), we hope you’ll catch a glimpse of Colorado Springs’ former public transportation glory as it was funded by millionaire gold king Winfield Scott Stratton.

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Whether you like or appreciate the musicianship of this brand of metal, you’d think the fact that Jag Panzer is probably the biggest band ever to come out of Colorado Springs (in terms of album sales and international fame—see interview below) would earn them some modicum of respect here in the Pikes Peak region. Alas, few have even heard of them.

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It’s not a professional sporting event, nor is there any prize money, nor is there any reward beyond bragging rights and having done it. It’s the 500-mile Colorado Trail Race through the backcountry. And even though you can’t watch it on television or listen to it on the radio, you can follow the racers, all of whom have GPS SPOT Tracking devices, on The Big Something.

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The grueling, self-supported Colorado Trail Race begins next Tuesday. We interviewed Colorado Springs bicyclist Doug Johnson last year after he placed second in the the epic 470-mile back-country race along the Colorado Trail from Denver to Durango with a time of 4 days and 20 hours. In this interview and slide show, Johnson talks about the technical and mental challenges and why he does it.

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Following World War II, Colorado Springs native Fred Schumm enrolled in the Fine Arts Center where he met photographer Myron Wood. They became great friends and Myron documented Fred’s fantastical playground sculptures in Conejos and Boulder Crescent Parks. Craig Richardson spoke with Fred Schumm, now 85 and living in New Jersey, about the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Myron Wood and the playground sculptures he constructed while working for the city. Shortly after the sculptures in Conejos and Boulder Crescent parks were completed, Schumm was awarded a Fulbright Grant to study art in Italy.

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It’s hard to believe that KRCC will be 60 years old next year! Just to put that in context, we’re 20 years older than National Public Radio (which will be turning 40 next year). When cultural institutions have been around as long as KRCC, it can be easy to forget that it hasn’t always [...]

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This is the second part of a two-part series of audio slide shows a recent trip to Haiti that Colorado Springs-based Orthopedic Surgeon Rick Meinig organized to help treat severe injuries in Port au Prince after the January 12 earthquake. To watch Part 1 and to learn more about it, click HERE.

DISCLAIMER: SOME [...]

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(DISCLAIMER: Some people may find images in this slideshow disturbing.)

After waiting a week after the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti to hear back from a variety volunteer organizations that take doctors to disaster areas, Colorado Springs-based Orthopedic Surgeon Rick Meinig felt compelled to take matters into his own hands. Using connections [...]

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News

AP
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Within hours of a government announcement last week that a truce had been signed and the release of more than 200 schoolgirls secured, another 25 were kidnapped by Boko Haram extremists.
 

EPA/Landov
October 24, 2014 | NPR · The toddler was reportedly brought by her grandmother from neighboring Guinea, where the epidemic is raging.
 

Alison Bruzek/NPR
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Shirley Corriher, author of Cookwise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Cooking, has tips on taking the bitter bite out of coffee, and holding onto cabbage’s red hue while it’s in the pan.
 

Arts & Life

Other Press
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Reporter Giuseppe di Piazza’s debut novel, The Four Corners of Palermo, follows an unnamed young reporter during the brutal early days of the mafia’s conflict with the Italian government in the 1980s.
 

Thomas Dunne Books
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Historian Peter Ackroyd’s new book surveys the history of England from the end of the Tudor era to the Glorious Revolution of 1688 — almost a century of war, debate and transformation.
 

October 24, 2014 | NPR · Ken Turan reviews the documentary Citizenfour from filmmaker Laura Poitras about Edward Snowden and his decision to leak information about the National Security Agency’s surveillance activities.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Recorded with Liz Harris’ voice, a piano and not much else, Ruins achieves striking intimacy, its emotional heft commanding attention throughout.
 

October 24, 2014 | NPR · NPR TV critic Eric Deggans looks at the new documentary, Mr. Dynamite: The Rise of James Brown, featuring rare and never-before-seen footage. The film premieres on HBO Monday.
 

Getty Images
October 23, 2014 | NPR · The mockingbird is known for latching on to sounds and repeating them. But in the case of a certain four-note phrase New Orleans musicians use to communicate, the bird may be the original artist.
 

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