In Memoriam, 2010

On December 21, 2010 By

As the year comes to a close, we remember some of the many luminous individuals no longer with us who made our community a better place to live.

Dr. Ted Eastburn, former City Council member, open Space advocate, and affordable healthcare advocate:

Click HERE to read Kathryn Eastburn’s rememberance.

Bo […]

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The Scoop on Brian Nemeth

On December 13, 2010 By

If you’ve ever walked more than half-a-block through downtown Colorado Springs in the past decade, you’ve likely been approached (or accosted) by one of Colorado Springs’ greatest characters: Brian Nemeth. A self-styled poet and aspiring news anchor, Nemeth relentlessly peddles his raunchy and frequently belligerent poems and opinions as one-sheet photocopied handouts for a […]

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Stratton's Streetcars

On November 23, 2010 By

In this slide show of images from the Pikes Peak Library District’s Digital Photography Archive with text by Marshall Sprague from his history of the region, “Newport in the Rockies” (read by Craig Richardson), we hope you’ll catch a glimpse of Colorado Springs’ former public transportation glory as it was funded by millionaire gold king Winfield Scott Stratton.

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Whether you like or appreciate the musicianship of this brand of metal, you’d think the fact that Jag Panzer is probably the biggest band ever to come out of Colorado Springs (in terms of album sales and international fame—see interview below) would earn them some modicum of respect here in the Pikes Peak region. Alas, few have even heard of them.

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It’s not a professional sporting event, nor is there any prize money, nor is there any reward beyond bragging rights and having done it. It’s the 500-mile Colorado Trail Race through the backcountry. And even though you can’t watch it on television or listen to it on the radio, you can follow the racers, all of whom have GPS SPOT Tracking devices, on The Big Something.

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The grueling, self-supported Colorado Trail Race begins next Tuesday. We interviewed Colorado Springs bicyclist Doug Johnson last year after he placed second in the the epic 470-mile back-country race along the Colorado Trail from Denver to Durango with a time of 4 days and 20 hours. In this interview and slide show, Johnson talks about the technical and mental challenges and why he does it.

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Following World War II, Colorado Springs native Fred Schumm enrolled in the Fine Arts Center where he met photographer Myron Wood. They became great friends and Myron documented Fred’s fantastical playground sculptures in Conejos and Boulder Crescent Parks. Craig Richardson spoke with Fred Schumm, now 85 and living in New Jersey, about the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Myron Wood and the playground sculptures he constructed while working for the city. Shortly after the sculptures in Conejos and Boulder Crescent parks were completed, Schumm was awarded a Fulbright Grant to study art in Italy.

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It’s hard to believe that KRCC will be 60 years old next year! Just to put that in context, we’re 20 years older than National Public Radio (which will be turning 40 next year). When cultural institutions have been around as long as KRCC, it can be easy to forget that it hasn’t always […]

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This is the second part of a two-part series of audio slide shows a recent trip to Haiti that Colorado Springs-based Orthopedic Surgeon Rick Meinig organized to help treat severe injuries in Port au Prince after the January 12 earthquake. To watch Part 1 and to learn more about it, click HERE.

DISCLAIMER: SOME […]

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(DISCLAIMER: Some people may find images in this slideshow disturbing.)

After waiting a week after the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti to hear back from a variety volunteer organizations that take doctors to disaster areas, Colorado Springs-based Orthopedic Surgeon Rick Meinig felt compelled to take matters into his own hands. Using connections […]

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News

AP
May 24, 2017 | NPR · The NFL Commissioner says the changes are intended to deliver “a more exciting game experience.” The league will still penalize celebrations deemed offensive or that mimic the use of weapons.
 

Getty Images
May 24, 2017 | NPR · Longtime U.S. women’s soccer team star Julie Foudy says the things she learned on the field aren’t so much about winning as about how women can unleash their inner force and stand up for something.
 

May 24, 2017 | NPR · The National Institute for Early Education Research has a new state-by-state report on preschool funding, enrollment and teacher quality. The findings are both encouraging and sobering.
 

Arts & Life

NPR
May 24, 2017 | NPR · Detroit garage-rocker Josh Malerman’s second novel follows a fictional 1950s rock bad recruited by the government to find the source of a mysterious, ominous sound emanating from the Namib Desert.
 

May 23, 2017 | NPR · Though most came to know him in the James Bond films, Roger Moore first displayed his brand of undercover suave in the TV series, The Saint. Moore died Tuesday at the age of 89.
 

ABC
May 23, 2017 | NPR · Some may see Rachel Lindsay’s rise as progress; but diversity isn’t about expecting black people to assimilate into a mostly white world.
 

Music

AP
May 23, 2017 | NPR · Within the Quota criticized the restrictive immigration laws passed by Congress after World War I. Now the Princeton University Ballet has brought the show back — with a few updates.
 

WXPN
May 23, 2017 | WXPN · The Melbourne band consists of a pair of brothers and a pair of cousins, plus one. Hear its Cinderella story — from playing bedroom jams to signing with Sub Pop — in this session.
 

May 23, 2017 | FA · Rock critic Ken Tucker reviews Styles’ self-titled solo album, as well as Waiting on a Song, by Auerbach of The Black Keys. Tucker says the new albums “meet in a middle-ground of forced humility.”
 

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