Rafters in western Colorado can keep on paddling…for now. After months of negotiations, two rafting companies near Gunnison have reached an agreement with a private developer to continue floating along the Taylor River this summer. The developer wanted to ban rafting on a stretch of river that flows through his land, which ignited a storm [...]

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Property owners have declared a temporary truce in a dispute with commercial rafters and will allow commercial rafting on their property this summer…U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has approved temporary roads on roadless national forest land in western Colorado for construction of boreholes to vent methane from a coal mine…and, Colorado College President Richard Celeste [...]

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Lawmakers at the statehouse have reached an impasse on a bill to clarify that rafters can float through private property. The house and senate couldn’t agree on the same version of the bill, leaving it up to voters to wade through what’s become a controversial issue. Bente Birkeland has more from the state capitol.

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Since state lawmakers have yet to decide, Governor Bill Ritter is hopeful that he can broker a peace deal between white water rafters and private property owners who are fighting about who has the right to float down Colorado’s rivers. Bente Birkeland has more from the state capitol.

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The state senate has given initial approval to a bill aimed at using natural gas to reduce Front Range emissions from coal-fired power plants…A proposal for Colorado to sell the state-chartered workers’ compensation insurance fund seeking privatization has been canceled…and, county commissioners in the San Luis Valley are endorsing a proposal to establish a national [...]

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The state senate watered down a bill that seeks to clarify whether rafters have the right to float through private property. Lawmakers have turned it into a study, but the bill still needs a final vote in the senate before it can move forward. Bente Birkeland has more from the state capitol.

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More than one hundred ranchers, farmers and rafters flooded the state capitol yesterday to testify on a controversial rafting bill. The measure has been the subject of intense lobbying from both sides, and the vote was a close one. Bente Birkeland reports from the state house.

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Colorado lawmakers are one step closer to clearing up a decades old law on whether whitewater rafters can legally float through private property. The house cleared the controversial measure on Tuesday. It would let rafters portage on a bank to avoid a hazard, or touch the river bed and wade through low waters. Bente Birkeland [...]

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The Colorado House of Representatives has given preliminary approval to a bill that would give commercial rafters the right to navigate the state’s rivers and limited rights to use the riverbanks to avoid obstacles…Colorado mountain towns whose lodging-tax collections have suffered along with the travel industry are trying to make sure homeowners who rent out [...]

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State lawmakers are hoping to put to rest a longstanding debate about whether whitewater rafters can float through private property. The most recent dispute is pitting a developer against two rafting companies near Gunnison. Bente Birkeland reports from the statehouse.

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An Amtrak rider who alarmed fellow passengers in Colorado by talking about terrorist threats on a cell phone was pulled from the train in La Junta, and faces a felony charge of endangering public transportation…Gov. Bill Ritter is urging a group looking at water issues across the state to offer some ideas by the time [...]

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Lt. Governor Barbara O’Brien released a new report yesterday that aims to get more Colorado children outside to enjoy nature. It’s part of her Colorado Kids Outdoors Initiative. Bente Birkeland has more from the state house.

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Colorado’s ski industry is gearing up for the season and this year some of the biggest resorts are upping their efforts to promote the use of helmets. Vail Resorts is requiring all employees to wear helmets, and Intrawest, which operates Winter Park and Steamboat, is requiring helmet use by children in ski school. The increased [...]

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Round-Up

On September 29, 2009 By

Gambling regulators lower their forecast…Governor Bill Ritter speaks about water at a symposium…and, federal authorities look to change how oil development is regulated.

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Round-Up

On September 24, 2009 By

A judge rejects a lawsuit that was blocking an agreement to finance construction of a new USOC headquarters…A federal judge rejects a request from Colorado health officials seeking to set an enforceable deadline for destroying mustard agent at the Pueblo Chemical Depot…and, more.

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Round-Up

On September 18, 2009 By

A committee of lawmakers makes proposals regarding Colorado’s state-chartered workers compensation insurance company…the state’s unemployment rate falls…and, the Ski Train may operate this year, afterall.

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A controversial proposal to swap forest service land in southwestern Colorado shows no signs of letting up. On Tuesday the U.S. Forest Service briefed La Plata county officials on the latest developments with the project. The public will get a chance to comment on the proposal at a hearing in early September and a large [...]

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When new gaming laws went into effect on July 2nd, the casinos of Cripple Creek celebrated in style. Craps and roulette were on the gaming menu, the cap on bets rose to a hundred dollars, and twenty-four hour gambling was now allowed. One casino even held a pajama party to mark the occasion. [...]

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Round-Up

On August 5, 2009 By

Colorado’s Title Board approves ballot language for a measure that aims to protect embryos…Governor Bill Ritter says he won’t ask for a tax increase to help balance the state budget…and, a new law aimed at protecting bicyclists goes into effect.

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Round-Up

On August 3, 2009 By

The U.S. Postal Service considers closing branches to save money…Colorado revises its proposal for roadless land…and, a record-breaking catch.

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In today’s “Citizen Report,” resident Caroline Vulgamore proves you’re never too old to have a little fun.

(The “Citizen Report” is a collaboration between the Colorado Springs Gazette and KRCC. More information is available at the YourHub link at ColoradoSprings.com.)

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Round-Up

On July 21, 2009 By

The U.S. Forest Service closes a shooting range for a safety review after a man is accidentally shot…Colorado’s U.S. Senators request that the Army institute a pilot program at Ft. Carson…and, Governor Bill Ritter addresses Congress.

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This week, Pleasant Valley resident and outdoor enthusiast Caroline Vulgamore tells fear to take a hike.

(The “Citizen Report” is a collaboration between the Colorado Springs Gazette and KRCC. More information is available at the YourHub link at ColoradoSprings.com.)

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News

ASSOCIATED PRESS
September 17, 2014 | NPR · The Carolina Panthers placed Greg Hardy on the list over a long-running case and the Cardinals did the same after Jonathan Dwyer was arrested on suspicion of aggravated assault.
 

The Canadian Press
September 17, 2014 | NPR · The mayor, who made international news after he admitted to smoking crack, dropped out of the mayoral race last week. Ford’s doctor said he was “optimistic.”
 

AP
September 17, 2014 | NPR · The Fed said because wage-and-price hikes remain low and growth continues at a moderate pace, interest rates will stay at historic lows for a “considerable time.”
 

Arts & Life

September 17, 2014 | NPR · Martin Amis’ latest novel, which takes place in Auschwitz, has already stirred up controversy in Europe according to the New York Times. But reviewer Alan Cheuse calls it the triumph of Amis’ career.
 

Courtesy of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
September 17, 2014 | NPR · Hayes, a professor of writing at the University of Pittsburgh, was recognized for “reflecting on race, gender, and family in works that seamlessly encompass both the historical and the personal.”
 

iStockphoto
September 17, 2014 | NPR · How one woman’s quest to bring you the scientific method has resulted in a blog project chock-full of chocolate chip cookie experiments. Wear your oven mitt and bring a glass of milk.
 

Music

Folk Alley
September 17, 2014 | FolkAlley · Loretta Lynn, Jason Isbell, Jackson Browne, and more of the most revered artists in roots music performed live from Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium.
 

Vimeo
September 17, 2014 | NPR · A slow fade, rather than a hard stop, used to be the popular way to end a pop song. NPR’s Robert Siegel speaks with Slate reporter William Weir about the fade-out’s history and recent decline.
 

Mountain Stage
September 17, 2014 | NPR · The Portland singer counts indie-rock, folk and Celtic musicians among his many collaborators, but here he performs both solo and accompanied by the Mountain Stage band.
 

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