The Scoop on Brian Nemeth

On December 13, 2010 By

If you’ve ever walked more than half-a-block through downtown Colorado Springs in the past decade, you’ve likely been approached (or accosted) by one of Colorado Springs’ greatest characters: Brian Nemeth. A self-styled poet and aspiring news anchor, Nemeth relentlessly peddles his raunchy and frequently belligerent poems and opinions as one-sheet photocopied handouts for a [...]

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If one Internet year = about 10 pre-Internet years, then 1993 was about 170 years ago and it really feels that way when you listen to this very first public radio broadcast over the Internet for Science Friday. Remember 9600 bps dial-up terminals, electronic messages, graphical interfaces, the data superhighway, virtual multi-user dungeons (MUDs), and information anxiety? Hop aboard the public radio time machine!

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Stratton's Streetcars

On November 23, 2010 By

In this slide show of images from the Pikes Peak Library District’s Digital Photography Archive with text by Marshall Sprague from his history of the region, “Newport in the Rockies” (read by Craig Richardson), we hope you’ll catch a glimpse of Colorado Springs’ former public transportation glory as it was funded by millionaire gold king Winfield Scott Stratton.

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An Elf at Work

On November 22, 2010 By

It’s almost Black Friday and we thought you might like to see these two slide shows of one of Colorado Springs’ greatest elves’ work. Before becoming a renowned sculptor of playful, toy-like objects, Sean O’Meallie designed and made toys.

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Based on his Pulitzer-Prize-nominated 2009 article “Casualties of War” about the effects of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder on a platoon of Fort Carson soldiers after they returned from Iraq, Gazette reporter Dave Phillips’ book Lethal Warriors: When the New Band of Brothers Came Home was published on November 9. Though the official book signing at Border’s was last week, you can pick up a copy and get it signed tonight at Southside Johnny’s tonight from 5 to 8 p.m.

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Better Mousetraps?

On November 16, 2010 By

It’s that time of year: when even the mice get cold and come inside. However you decide to deal with them (or not) the quest to build a better mousetrap has led inventors down some strange, sadistic and sometimes even beautiful design roads. The Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum happens to have a fantastic collection of historical and contemporary traps. CSPM Executive Director Matt Mayberry picked out some of his favorites to share with us in a virtual exhibition he calls “A Bad Day for Mickey.”

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The mobile slaughter unit we profiled in the Septembers edition of Western Skies will be on hand tomorrow at Venetucci Farm for a demonstration of how this kind of small-time processing can connect consumers with the food they eat. Very few people in the US ever get the opportunity to have a literal ranch-to-table experience and we highly recommend this for those who want to have a more complete understanding of how their meat can be processed in a humane and healthy way on the land where it was raised by a person who lives in our community.

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Tomorrow’s election has a number of races and initiatives that will likely have profound effects for the city, state and nation. We hope you plan to vote tomorrow if you haven’t already. Here are a number of interviews and links to KRCC’s recent coverage of the election and its many issues. We hope this coverage will enlighten you about the past, present and future of local politics as you make your decisions.

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Home Is Where The Art Is

On October 18, 2010 By

Local arts maven Kathleen Fox Collins takes us on a tour of what is certainly one of the most interesting and unusual homes in Colorado Springs. It was designed in the 1950s by the husband-and-wife architectural team of Gordon Ingraham and Elizabeth Wright-Ingraham (Granddaughter of Frank Lloyd Wright) for the Mitguard family near the bluffs in Palmer Park. Constructed in 1956, a whole series of renovations and fantastical, mind-boggling embellishments were later added by the home’s owner, Don Vail. While the structure itself is an interesting example of local mid-20th Century modernism, its Vail’s finish work inside and outside that gives the home its amazing character.

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With a large Libertarian contingency here, some might wonder how the ideals took root in Colorado Springs. Part of the answer may come from a recent New Yorker article titled “Covert Operations” by Jane Mayer about Tea Party funders Charles and David Koch. It referred to a now-defunct Colorado Springs-based libertarian institution called The Freedom School. With the help of the Colorado College and Pikes Peak Library District Special Collections, Noel Black and Craig Richardson created this portrait of the Freedom School, which later became Rampart College.

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We’re really incredibly proud of this episode of Western Skies. It’s heavy on the information and an attention grabber all the way through. If you care about the food you eat and where it comes from, we guarantee you’ll learn something great. If you missed it, you can listen to the whole thing [...]

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It’s almost impossible to believe how controversial many of Christo and Jean-Claude’s projects have been. After all, they work with fabric. Yet even in New York City the infamous Orange Gates took 26 years to realize after many controversies. The Over the River Project, which would cover 5.9 miles of the Arkansas River, is no different and there are 11 days left to comment.

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Last summer, we took you on a tour of a Buckminster Fuller-style geo-dome greenhouse made on the cheap by John Sondericker in his back yard. We went back this summer to see how it went last summer and what modifications had to be made and how it changed his cost among many other things he learned.

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Michael Kaiser, president of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts has been touring the nation over the past year for the Arts in Crisis Tour, a program implemented following the economic downturn designed to assist arts and cultural organizations better position themselves during the lean times. Craig Richardson spoke with Kaiser during his visit to Colorado Springs.

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Idris Khan in Context

On June 24, 2010 By

For those of you who plan to attend Idris Khan’s artist talk and Susan Grace’s performance of Schubert’s piano sonatas this Saturday evening at 4 p.m. in the I.D.E.A. Space Gallery at the Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, we put together a brief slide show of Khan’s work to help further contextualize the video piece in the gallery, “Last 3 Piano Sonatas…after Franz Schubert”

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Still Life at Yard Sale

On June 23, 2010 By

Nothing says summer in America quite like a yard sale. On the surface, it’s a great way to get rid of unwanted consumer goods and earn a little extra cash/find stuff you may or may not have been looking for on the cheap. But it can also be an extraordinarily personal act of revelation in which individuals turn their front yards and garages into intimate thrift stores of memory.

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There’s still an other-worldliness and anonymity about alleys that’s… yes, magical.

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For as impersonal as Facebook and the monotemplate it creates for all your contacts can seem, artist Sarah Milteer found the social networking site to be a goldmine of photographs for her intimate portraits of her friends in the arts community. In this slide show she talks about the project and why she’s drawn to portraiture.

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Following World War II, Colorado Springs native Fred Schumm enrolled in the Fine Arts Center where he met photographer Myron Wood. They became great friends and Myron documented Fred’s fantastical playground sculptures in Conejos and Boulder Crescent Parks. Craig Richardson spoke with Fred Schumm, now 85 and living in New Jersey, about the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Myron Wood and the playground sculptures he constructed while working for the city. Shortly after the sculptures in Conejos and Boulder Crescent parks were completed, Schumm was awarded a Fulbright Grant to study art in Italy.

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Colorado Springs native Jim Lewis attended Cheyenne Mountain High School then went on to Colorado College to study history and philosophy and eventually became a Broadway book writer. He’s nominated for a Tony Award for his book Fela! about the great Nigerian singer Fela Kuti. Kathryn Eastburn spoke with Lewis by phone.

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More than half-a-million people will ascend Pikes Peak by foot, bike, horse, train and automobile this summer. In 1873, Grace Greenwood, travel correspondent and the first female reporter on the New York Times‘ payroll, made the ascent by burro to the newly constructed signal station pictured above. In this first video you can listen to [...]

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Whether you heard this week’s inaugural episode of the relaunch of Western Skies or just want to hear it again, you can access the entire show and its various segments and lots of Web extras at the Western Skies page on KRCC.org.

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(Mike Matthews’ Webcor reel-to-reel recorder on which he recorded his interview with Lorne Greene on the set of Bonanza in 1965)

In this third installment of our constantly evolving Big Something Radio Programme, local retiree Mike Matthews tells his own Lorne Greene story. It’s a story about youthful dreams, a [...]

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News

AP
October 31, 2014 | NPR · Andrew Tahmooressi said he made a wrong turn and ended up across the border in Mexico with his legally registered guns, which were illegal in Mexico. He has been in a Mexican jail for seven months.
 

AP
October 31, 2014 | NPR · Philip Banks III was set to become Commissioner William Bratton’s deputy. The reasons for his abrupt resignation are not clear.
 

October 31, 2014 | NPR · This week, the Federal Reserve ended the quantitative easing program. Author John Lanchester says Anthony Trollope’s 19th century novel The Way We Live Now clarifies the current financial situation.
 

Arts & Life

October 31, 2014 | NPR · This week, the Federal Reserve ended the quantitative easing program. Author John Lanchester says Anthony Trollope’s 19th century novel The Way We Live Now clarifies the current financial situation.
 

HBO
October 31, 2014 | NPR · “I’ve made a career of playing small supporting roles,” McDormand says. And in a four-hour HBO miniseries she plays Kitteridge, a supporting character who “should be a leading lady.”
 

University of Alabama Press
October 31, 2014 | NPR · There’s nothing like a good ghost story on Halloween — and some of the best tales were told by the late storyteller and NPR commentator Kathryn Tucker Windham.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
October 31, 2014 | NPR · In an interview with NPR’s Melissa Block, Swift addresses what’s changed since she began her career — not just for her, but for the teenaged girls who have always been her biggest supporters.
 

October 31, 2014 | NPR · The Metropolitan Opera will be celebrating New Year’s Eve with Franz Lehar’s The Merry Widow in a new production starring soprano Fleming. But its greatest incarnations have been on film.
 

October 31, 2014 | NPR · Hear music for the season and spine-chilling Scottish tales, narrated by host Fiona Ritchie.
 

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