(All images in this slide show by John Suhay and courtesy of Jina Brenneman. Please keep in mind these are scans of photographs, and thus not exact reproductions.)

If you’ve never heard of John Suhay, you’re not alone. But his photography has captured the hearts of those who know him well, and [...]

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The Hopi Snake Dance

On August 30, 2011 By

(All photos in this slide show are courtesy of the Pikes Peak Library District/PPLD and the Denver Public Library/DPL.)

Each year at approximately this time, the Hopi people perform The Snake Dance, a sacred ritual believed to bring rain to their desert land in northeastern Arizona. Though it’s no longer an event open [...]

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What with all the hoopla surrounding the USA Pro Cycling Challenge we thought it’d be fun to offer, as a comparison, a couple of videos featuring the zenith of Colorado cycling in 1980, The Klunker Classic.

It’s hard to imagine Colorado without mountain bikes. The knobby-tired bicycles are so ubiquitous now that it seems [...]

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Despite the fertility of the Arkansas River Valley, not every seed will grow. Such was the case with the African-American homesteaders who settled “The Dry,” which was abandoned due to irrigation issues. KRCC’s Kate Jonuska reports on a recent archeological dig that is attempting to bring The Dry’s history back into the light.

This [...]

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If you ever find your mind wondering about the histories of some of the neat old buildings you encounter whilst wandering about town, you may find those pangs of wonderment satiated in this third edition of Brief Histories of Beautiful Buildings. Once again, Tim Scanlon gently guides us through Colorado Springs’ past to uncover the [...]

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Uniquely Colorado

On August 8, 2011 By

In our latest installment of Western Skies, we set out across Colorado to explore our backyard with the hope of discovering that which defines the unique identity of our state. If you missed yesterday’s broadcast of Western Skies, or if you haven’t had a chance to view the slide shows that accompany the [...]

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This month we’re taking you on a trip through Colorado, visiting places and talking to people that help make the Centennial State what it is.

You can listen to the full episode, or download here.

You can also head to the individual segments for the audio and web extras:

The Great [...]

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If one man is synonymous with the Colorado Rockies, it is Robert Ormes. Despite his profession as an English teacher at the Fountain Valley School and later as an English Professor at Colorado College, Ormes is most widely known for his contributions to Colorado Mountaineering via the publication of A Guide to [...]

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Controversy about hydraulic fracturing on the East Coast may have consequences in Colorado…Colorado lawmakers have unanimously approved an audit of the state’s Public Utilities Commission over how the agency has handled decisions affecting energy, taxicab and telecommunication companies…and, seven members of the Tuskegee Airmen visited the Air Force Academy today at the same time [...]

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This 4th of July marked the 120th anniversary of The Independence Mine claim that made Winfield Scott Stratton one of the wealthiest gold barons in history. But as local historian Richard Marold recounts in this audio slide show, Winfield Scott Stratton wasn’t your typical gold baron, and much of his legacy still stands in [...]

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In our most recent installment of Western Skies, we explored the proximity between the perceptions and realities of the West and cowboy culture. We made a visit to the Western Jubilee Recording Company in Colorado Springs on a recent night where famed cowboy poet, Waddie Mitchell recited his poems and Western guitar player, Rich O’Brien [...]

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One of the most pervasive notions of American cultural identity is that of the Old West and the myth of the cowboy. This month we stick a magnifying glass up to those notions to see where they originate, and where they continue to resonate.

You can listen to the full episode, or download [...]

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OK, Computer?

On June 27, 2011 By

Few can cast a cynical eye upon history and society quite like the Brits. From the Angry Young Men to Monty Python, the Clash to New Order—fatalism and futility were never so well-appointed. Perhaps it’s the gloomy pragmatism of the post-Imperial British imagination, which documentary filmmaker Adam Curtis taps into with a [...]

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In the late 19th and early 20th century, a few names dominate the history of Colorado Springs, especially with regard to the gold mines of Cripple Creek. The spectacular wealth of Spencer Penrose, Winfield Scott Stratton and Jumpin’ Jimmy Burns tends to overshadow the stories of the men who worked one or two levels [...]

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When freelance curator and textile collector Joyce Cheney began collecting aprons there was little interest in the history of these icons of domesticity. She was able to amass a collection of over 400 aprons, most of which she found in thrift stores and at auctions in the 1990s. In 2000, Cheney wrote the book [...]

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For many, flipping a light switch is a common occurrence. Flip a switch, and a light turns on almost instantaneously. This month we’re taking a look at some of the issues that enable that lightbulb to power on, or enable cars and buses to take you from point A to point B. Today, we’re [...]

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Governor John Hickenlooper signed a tax amnesty measure into law today. It’s expected to bring in about 12 and a half million dollars to the state…and, crews digging out a site in western Colorado have unearthed the fossilized skeletons of over a dozen mastodons, including the skull of an infant.

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An oratorio began as a religious concert, which was coupled with narration to tell a story. Now many communities, including the city of Pueblo, are using the art form and some advanced technology to tell their town’s rich and often poignant history. KRCC’s Kate Jonuska recorded an early rehearsal of “The Song of Pueblo,” [...]

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In 1936, Colorado Springs mega-man Spencer Penrose produced an advertorial documentary film titled Curious Colorado. The film showcases the various Penrose-owned properties and attractions of the Pikes Peak region, including the Cheyenne Mountain Auto Highway & Lodge, The Will Rogers Shrine of the Sun, The Mt. Manitou Scenic Incline and the Cheyenne Mountain Zoological Gardens, [...]

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The final performance of “Vedem, a Holocaust Oratorio” will take place his morning at 10:30 a.m. at Shove Chapel, 1010 N. Nevada Ave. on the Colorado College Campus). Written by poet and librettist David Mason and composed by Lori Laitman, the oratorio tells both the history of the Terezin concentration camp in Czechoslovakia [...]

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Nine years ago today, KRCC’s Operations Manager, Jocelyn Sandberg, was murdered near KRCC’s building in downtown Colorado Springs. She was a powerful force at KRCC and in the community, and we miss her. A memorial website for Jocelyn still exists at www.zyrcster.com if you would like to spend a moment today thinking about Jocelyn [...]

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On this date in 1936, John Gaw Meem’s new Fine Arts Center building opened amid pomp heretofore unseen west of the Mighty Mississip. Bringing with it the promise of the West as a new cultural frontier with a week-long opening gala celebration complete with avant-garde exhibits and performances, featuring the groundbreaking works of [...]

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If you’re a fan of the Thomas Jefferson hour or a history buff, in general, you’ll enjoy what Colorado Public Television is doing with their Time Machine series, where local historical figures debate the news of the day. From the early days of the Colorado Territory to the Red Menace, explore history through the eyes [...]

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