The presidential election of 1896 was contested between William Jennings Bryan and William McKinley, one of the central issues of the campaign was the utilization of silver as a peg for the valuing of the US Dollar. This was a major issue for silver mining states, Colorado chief among them. Cripple Creek Gold Baron Winfield [...]

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The Big Something’s intrepid interns Brian Wray and Jacob Brownell were wondering what all the fuss over Seven Falls, one of Southern Colorado’s most popular tourist destinations, was about. It’s a little hard to explain the nuanced majesty of the place so we sent them off with a camera, a microphone and our [...]

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I was browsing through the Pikes Peak Library District’s Digital Archives when I encountered a series of photographs that beckoned my attention – perhaps it was the timeless subject matter of a young family or maybe the fact that I recognized the location of these photographs as a house on the corner of Uintah [...]

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This week, the City of Colorado Springs announced that, come the end of the Summer, it will discontinue the FREX (Front Range Express) bus service between Colorado Springs and Denver – effectively removing the last remaining mass-transit public transportation entity between the two cities. Times were, when a citizen had locomotive options, as local historian [...]

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Local tattoo enthusiasts Kayla Gronseth and Scott Boyer recently published a spectacularly well-researched and well-designed book about an object of their mutual curiosity: Milton H. Zeis, a one-time circus carney who helped popularize tattooing through clever and well-designed advertising and equipment that promised much and delivered, well… it delivered a great deal of iconic [...]

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The Great Fire

On June 11, 2012 By

10 years following Colorado’s largest recorded fire in history, the Hayman fire of June 2002, local historian Richard Marold explores another big burn that occurred in 1854, starting on Cheyenne Mountain and finally burning itself out near Wilkerson Pass.
The Great Fire of 1854

For a photographic look back at the Hayman Fire, [...]

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Few rags-to-riches stories are as American as the story of Winfield Scott Stratton. His name now adorns street signs, buildings and parks throughout the Pikes Peak Region, but the story (embellished as it may be by this reading from Marshall Sprague’s Money Mountain: The Story of Cripple Creek Gold) of just how hard [...]

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This month we’re taking a look at mining, the history of it in Colorado, and how towns have evolved as the ebb and flow of the industry cycles through.

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Most of Colorado is in a moderate to extreme drought, and the outlook for June doesn’t appear like conditions will improve…and, Airmen from Peterson Air Force Base’s 302nd Airlift Wing are in France for commemorative D-Day events.

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About 50 members from the 302nd Airlift Wing at Peterson Air Force Base are joining two other American crews in France for an airdrop Sunday in Normandy. The planned drop commemorates the historic Allied invasion that happened on June 6th, 1944 during World War II.

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Twenty minutes north of downtown Colorado Springs lies La Foret. Originally Alice Bemis Taylor’s vacation compound and now a conference and retreat center that hosts the annual MeadowGrass music festival each Memorial Day weekend.

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Katie Rudolph at the old Pikes Peak Library District is hosting what we hope will become a regular staple in PPLD-TV land. The idea is to combine the two great tastes that taste great together – history and food. In this pilot episode, Katie whips up some potato doughnuts from a Depression-era [...]

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Medical practice in the early days of Colorado Springs wasn’t necessarily what was portrayed on the 1990′s CBS costume drama, Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman – historian Richard Marold brings us this historical report:
Pioneering Medicine: A Day in the Life of Dr. Charles Fox Gardiner

Richard Marold is a local historian who [...]

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Colorado College assistant Spanish professor, Daniel Arroyo-Rodriguez, presents a microLecture on how film and literature have helped recuperate the historical memory of the Spanish Civil War. Arroyo-Rodriguez received his BA in Philology from the University of Seville, in Spain, and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Department of Romance Languages [...]

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As the official photographer of the famed Hayden Geological Surveys of the Western United States in the early 1870′s, William Henry Jackson was the first to document many of the Rocky Mountain’s legendary vistas – these photographs played a major role in the establishment of Yellowstone National Park in 1872. One of [...]

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In the third and final part of our series of the history of Colorado Springs’ most-used park, Judith Rice-Jones unveils the history of Monument Valley Park following the devastating Memorial Day flood of 1935 and the opportunities that exist for bettering the amenity. If you missed Part I and II of this series, you [...]

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Yesterday marked the 80th Anniversary of the last day of streetcar service in Colorado Springs, April 30, 1932. Here are two pieces from the archives that tell the story of the golden days of public transportation in the shadow of Pikes Peak.

In this slide show of images from the Pikes Peak Library [...]

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We decided to take in some culture and wound up visiting with the fine folks over at THEATREWORKS as they were putting the finishing touches on their production of Friedrich Schiller’s Mary Stuart, a play that THEATREWORKS artistic director Murray Ross describes as an Elizabethan version of West Wing.

Mary Stuart runs through [...]

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In this, our second installment of our series of the history of Colorado Springs’ most-used park, Judith Rice-Jones unveils the history of Monument Valley Park prior to the devastating Memorial Day flood of 1935. If you missed Part I of this series, you may view it HERE. More to come in the following weeks!
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Local historian Judith Rice-Jones takes us on a brief history tour of the early days of parks in Colorado Springs.

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Colorado Springs historian, Judith Rice-Jones, guides us through the early days of Colorado Springs and William Jackson Palmer’s vision of Monument Valley Park. Rice-Jones takes us from Pike’s impressions of the region up to Palmer’s dream for the 2-mile linear park running through the center of Colorado Springs. This is the first part in our [...]

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Last summer on Western Skies we gazed into the hazy and complex myths of The West and mystique surrounding cowboy culture. One of our panelists for the Roundtable Discussion was Anne Hyde, Colorado College’s William J. Hochman Professor of History. Hyde is the author of Empires, Nations and Families: A History of the [...]

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State employees in Colorado are closer to seeing new rules for how they’re paid, hired and fired…Colorado College history professor Anne Hyde wins prestigious ‘Bancroft’ award.

KRCC is a licensee of Colorado College. Professor Anne Hyde also appeared in an episode of Western Skies that aired last year. You can revisit the episode [...]

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