Full disclosure, I make several brief appearances in The Western Way, a documentary produced by Susan Loo Pattee and the Cheyenne Mountain Heritage Center that seeks to broadly decode the odd DNA of Colorado Springs and its histories through the voices of many including Colorado College Professor Ann Hyde, Philanthropist and Entrepreneur Lyda […]

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Paul and James Bizzaro spent their childhoods living in a house right behind the Statue of Liberty. Their family moved to Liberty Island 75 years ago, not long after their father became a guard at the statue. Lady Liberty was their playground. And their father kept her torch lit for 36 years.

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The assassination of the NAACP field secretary galvanized a growing civil rights movement, the effects of which are still being felt across the South today.

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Colorado is no stranger to the military. From active bases to a large veteran population, many residents of the state have some kind of association with the armed services. This month for Western Skies, we’re exploring some of those relationships.

You can listen to the entire episode here, or download it by right-clicking […]

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By the end of the century, ocean levels could rise by 2 or 3 feet. That’s enough to flood the colonists’ first settlement at Jamestown, Va. And it’s putting pressure on archaeologists to get as many artifacts out of the ground as quickly as possible — before it’s too late.

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The Ludlow Massacre’s 100th anniversary is next year. As KRCC’s Eliza Densmore reports, a new panel will look at how to commemorate it.

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Ghost Army
[Audio clip: view full post to listen]

Back in 2011, we produced this slide show and radio feature (above) on local artist/teacher George Vandersluis and his involvement in the “Ghost Army,” a unit of WWII artists who created a modern Trojan horse: mass deceptions including inflatable fake tanks and sound […]

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In the 1970s, the Environmental Protection Agency sent 70 photographers out into the American landscape to”photographically document subjects of environmental concern,” a project known as DOCUMERICA that was interpreted widely by these photographers, and which yielded some stunning (and often horrifying) results. After reading a recent NPR blog post about the project, […]

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We were fascinated to learn yesterday from The Gazette that the Spencer Penrose’s rustic-posh Cheyenne Mountain Lodge may rise from the ruins:

The Broadmoor hotel in Colorado Springs is adding a second rustic retreat — planning to build an 8,000-square-foot lodge and up to 20 cabins on top of Cheyenne Mountain where hotel […]

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A former correctional facility in southeastern Colorado is among five historic sites chosen as the state’s Most Endangered Places this year.

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Historian Richard Marold explores the heyday of the Broadmoor International Center and the woman who brought a galaxy of stars to Colorado Springs.
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The Heyday of The Broadmoor International Center

Richard Marold is a local historian who works as a Chautauquan and […]

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It’s about time that the iPhone caught up with the awesomeness that is the history of Old Colorado City. Don Kallaus, member of the Old Colorado City History Center, discusses the genesis of the new iPhone app that delivers unto you the ghost of the world that haunts your OCC now-a-days.

[Audio […]

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The World War II Amache Japanese Internment Camp in southeastern Colorado is the subject of an exhibit at The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs opening today.

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Local historian, Richard Marold remembers longtime Cheyenne Mountain School teacher, principal, superintendent, coach and all-around renaissance man, Lloyd Shaw. Shaw was inducted into the Cheyenne Mountain School District 12 Hall of Fame on Friday October, 12th.

[Audio clip: view full post to listen]
Richard Marold Remembers Lloyd Shaw, Renaissance Man

Here […]

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This month we’re talking about politics and elections. The El Paso County ballot this year is quite large, with national, state, and county races and issues to consider, and even some special district measures. By comparison, the Pueblo County ballot is smaller, but still with national, state and local measures to consider.

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While many pundits and political prevaricators have argued that the present political situation in the United States is a figurative train wreck, local historian Richard Marold explores the history of a literal political train wreck that was organized by the Democratic Party in Colorado in 1896.
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Ah, would that powdery blue skies puffed with pinkish-orange clouds hung above crisp cutout buildings and horizons. Such idylls are the things of Penny Postcards, i.e. postcards made at the time when it only cost a penny to mail one. These classics conjure a decidedly imaginary nostalgia of the Pikes Peak region, but it […]

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Local Historian Richard Marold explores the history of Colorado’s beginnings as a full-fledged member of the United States in 1876 and the immediate electoral ramifications that followed in the presidential election that Fall.  The election turned out to be one of the most disputed and controversial elections in US history eventually granting […]

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In this third part of their four part series, Big Something interns Jake Brownell and Brian Wray explore the mysterious history of the goings-on within the Independent Order of Odd Fellows operating in Colorado Springs in the early 1900’s. You can watch Part I which is focused on the Royal Arcanum, HERE. […]

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Colorado voters could see up to five ballot questions this fall. Several groups are still gathering signatures in the final days before Monday’s August 6th deadline…Archeologists at Mesa Verde National Park say a crack is threatening the southern half of the park’s largest and most famous cliff dwelling.

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In 1894, upon the site of the present-day intersection of Austin Bluffs and Academy, Colorado’s Adjutant General, Thomas J. Tarsney was perhaps the last man to be tarred and feathered in the state of Colorado. Local historian Richard Marold tells the tale:

Tarsney Tarred and Feathered in Colorado Springs
[Audio clip: view full […]

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The list of famous movie stars born in Colorado Springs is a fairly short one. However short the list is, it is a rather impressive one if for no other reason than it contains the name of one of the first major stars of the silver screen: Mr. Lon Chaney. From playing […]

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The Highway 24 hole is 100-feet deep, and has shut down traffic between Leadville and the Vail Valley, where many residents commute to work each day. But this is more than your average sinkhole. As Aspen Public Radio’s Luke Runyon reports, this particular hole gives a glimpse into Leadville’s past, […]

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News

AP
August 25, 2016 | NPR · Donald Trump has centered on a key attack against Hillary Clinton: He says the Clinton Foundation was a pay-to-play front that enabled Hillary and Bill Clinton to trade government access for money.
 

Science Museum, London/Science Source
August 25, 2016 | KHN · A common over-the-counter medication used during procedures might make scopes harder to clean and increase the risk of contamination. It could put people at risk of infection, a small study finds.
 

AFP/Getty Images
August 24, 2016 | NPR · After losing to the Swedes in the Olympic quarterfinals, the longtime Team USA goalkeeper said she thought “we played a bunch of cowards.” Solo was widely criticized for her criticism.
 

Arts & Life

Les Arts Décoratifs
August 25, 2016 | NPR · Some 700 Barbie dolls are visiting Paris this summer. They span almost six decades of pretty, plastic history, including Malibu Barbie, astronaut Barbie, and, of course, Royal Canadian Mountie Barbie.
 

August 24, 2016 | NPR · Julia Green of Front Street Books recommends Moonlight on Linoleum by Terry Helwig, City of Women by David R. Gillham and The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly.
 

August 24, 2016 | FA · Krasinski says he’s thankful for his big break “every single day.” Three years after the wrap of The Office, he continues to branch out. He’s now directing and co-starring in the film The Hollars.
 

Music

August 24, 2016 | NPR · NPR’s Kelly McEvers talks with professor Christian Herbst, who was part of the team that released a study that explores the science behind Freddie Mercury’s amazing voice.
 

Courtesy of the artist
August 24, 2016 | NPR · Frankie Reyes is a Los Angeles-based artist who remakes classic Mexican and other Spanish-language ballads and waltzes using a vintage synthesizer. His new album is called Boleros Valses y Mas.
 

Courtesy of the artist
August 24, 2016 | NPR · From Shetland and Orkney to the Hebrides, the Isle of Man and Rathlin Island, this week’s diverse choice of music is far from insular.
 

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