Full disclosure, I make several brief appearances in The Western Way, a documentary produced by Susan Loo Pattee and the Cheyenne Mountain Heritage Center that seeks to broadly decode the odd DNA of Colorado Springs and its histories through the voices of many including Colorado College Professor Ann Hyde, Philanthropist and Entrepreneur Lyda [...]

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Paul and James Bizzaro spent their childhoods living in a house right behind the Statue of Liberty. Their family moved to Liberty Island 75 years ago, not long after their father became a guard at the statue. Lady Liberty was their playground. And their father kept her torch lit for 36 years.

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The assassination of the NAACP field secretary galvanized a growing civil rights movement, the effects of which are still being felt across the South today.

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Colorado is no stranger to the military. From active bases to a large veteran population, many residents of the state have some kind of association with the armed services. This month for Western Skies, we’re exploring some of those relationships.

You can listen to the entire episode here, or download it by right-clicking [...]

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By the end of the century, ocean levels could rise by 2 or 3 feet. That’s enough to flood the colonists’ first settlement at Jamestown, Va. And it’s putting pressure on archaeologists to get as many artifacts out of the ground as quickly as possible — before it’s too late.

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The Ludlow Massacre’s 100th anniversary is next year. As KRCC’s Eliza Densmore reports, a new panel will look at how to commemorate it.

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Ghost Army

Back in 2011, we produced this slide show and radio feature (above) on local artist/teacher George Vandersluis and his involvement in the “Ghost Army,” a unit of WWII artists who created a modern Trojan horse: mass deceptions including inflatable fake tanks and sound effects records that helped the allies win the [...]

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In the 1970s, the Environmental Protection Agency sent 70 photographers out into the American landscape to”photographically document subjects of environmental concern,” a project known as DOCUMERICA that was interpreted widely by these photographers, and which yielded some stunning (and often horrifying) results. After reading a recent NPR blog post about the project, [...]

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We were fascinated to learn yesterday from The Gazette that the Spencer Penrose’s rustic-posh Cheyenne Mountain Lodge may rise from the ruins:

The Broadmoor hotel in Colorado Springs is adding a second rustic retreat — planning to build an 8,000-square-foot lodge and up to 20 cabins on top of Cheyenne Mountain where hotel [...]

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A former correctional facility in southeastern Colorado is among five historic sites chosen as the state’s Most Endangered Places this year.

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Historian Richard Marold explores the heyday of the Broadmoor International Center and the woman who brought a galaxy of stars to Colorado Springs.

The Heyday of The Broadmoor International Center

Richard Marold is a local historian who works as a Chautauquan and portrays Winfield Scott Stratton, Franklin Roosevelt and Nikola Tesla. [...]

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It’s about time that the iPhone caught up with the awesomeness that is the history of Old Colorado City. Don Kallaus, member of the Old Colorado City History Center, discusses the genesis of the new iPhone app that delivers unto you the ghost of the world that haunts your OCC now-a-days.

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The World War II Amache Japanese Internment Camp in southeastern Colorado is the subject of an exhibit at The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs opening today.

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Local historian, Richard Marold remembers longtime Cheyenne Mountain School teacher, principal, superintendent, coach and all-around renaissance man, Lloyd Shaw. Shaw was inducted into the Cheyenne Mountain School District 12 Hall of Fame on Friday October, 12th.

Richard Marold Remembers Lloyd Shaw, Renaissance Man

Here is some footage shot by Lloyd Shaw in [...]

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This month we’re talking about politics and elections. The El Paso County ballot this year is quite large, with national, state, and county races and issues to consider, and even some special district measures. By comparison, the Pueblo County ballot is smaller, but still with national, state and local measures to consider.

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While many pundits and political prevaricators have argued that the present political situation in the United States is a figurative train wreck, local historian Richard Marold explores the history of a literal political train wreck that was organized by the Democratic Party in Colorado in 1896.

A Political Train Wreck

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Ah, would that powdery blue skies puffed with pinkish-orange clouds hung above crisp cutout buildings and horizons. Such idylls are the things of Penny Postcards, i.e. postcards made at the time when it only cost a penny to mail one. These classics conjure a decidedly imaginary nostalgia of the Pikes Peak region, but it [...]

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Local Historian Richard Marold explores the history of Colorado’s beginnings as a full-fledged member of the United States in 1876 and the immediate electoral ramifications that followed in the presidential election that Fall.  The election turned out to be one of the most disputed and controversial elections in US history eventually granting [...]

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In this third part of their four part series, Big Something interns Jake Brownell and Brian Wray explore the mysterious history of the goings-on within the Independent Order of Odd Fellows operating in Colorado Springs in the early 1900′s. You can watch Part I which is focused on the Royal Arcanum, HERE. [...]

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Colorado voters could see up to five ballot questions this fall. Several groups are still gathering signatures in the final days before Monday’s August 6th deadline…Archeologists at Mesa Verde National Park say a crack is threatening the southern half of the park’s largest and most famous cliff dwelling.

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In 1894, upon the site of the present-day intersection of Austin Bluffs and Academy, Colorado’s Adjutant General, Thomas J. Tarsney was perhaps the last man to be tarred and feathered in the state of Colorado. Local historian Richard Marold tells the tale:

Tarsney Tarred and Feathered in Colorado Springs

Richard Marold is a [...]

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The list of famous movie stars born in Colorado Springs is a fairly short one. However short the list is, it is a rather impressive one if for no other reason than it contains the name of one of the first major stars of the silver screen: Mr. Lon Chaney. From playing [...]

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The Highway 24 hole is 100-feet deep, and has shut down traffic between Leadville and the Vail Valley, where many residents commute to work each day. But this is more than your average sinkhole. As Aspen Public Radio’s Luke Runyon reports, this particular hole gives a glimpse into Leadville’s past, [...]

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News

EPA/Landov
October 23, 2014 | NPR · A man identified as 32-year-old Michael Zehaf-Bibeau was killed by police in a Parliament building in Ottawa. He’s being described as a recent convert to Islam.
 

EPA/Landov
October 23, 2014 | NPR · The saxophone superstar, hugely popular in mainland China, walked into a mine field in Hong Kong. Selfies with demonstrators sparked a response from the government — and Kenny G took down the tweets.
 

October 23, 2014 | NPR · The rate for routine vaccinations of babies used to be 97 percent. Now the figure is 27 percent. Blame it on the rippling effects of the oubreak.
 

Arts & Life

NPR
October 23, 2014 | NPR · Where’d the term “red tape” come from? Why are the Simpsons yellow? And is there a rhyme for orange? We answer these pressing questions — and more — in a new look at your old friend Roy G. Biv.
 

Viking
October 23, 2014 | NPR · The author of Reading Lolita in Tehran returns, this time with a paean to the importance of literature in a democratic society. Reviewer Heller McAlpin says Azar Nafisi may be preaching to the choir.
 

Courtesy of the artist
October 23, 2014 | NPR · In a candid interview, the ever-innovative pianist traces the lines between Buddhist chants, Sly Stone and Miles Davis, while shedding new light on some hard facts about his past.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
October 23, 2014 | NPR · In a candid interview, the ever-innovative pianist traces the lines between Buddhist chants, Sly Stone and Miles Davis, while shedding new light on some hard facts about his past.
 

October 22, 2014 | NPR · Steven Ellison has built an impressive reputation among critics and fans in the know for mixing hip hop, jazz and electronica into something original. But even for the aforementioned followers, the new album from Ellison — better-known as Flying Lotus — is a surprise. It’s all about death, not as something to be mourned but as a journey to be anticipated.
 

Mountain Stage
October 22, 2014 | NPR · The West Virginia natives, both widely respected in the world of string-band music, perform live.
 

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