The nearly 500-mile Colorado Trail is adding a new section expected to be ready for hiking this summer. The section takes part of the Canada-Mexico Continental Divide Trail and incorporates it into the Colorado Trail.

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Manitou Springs City Council took the last step tonight to approve the legal opening of the Manitou Incline to hikers, beginning Friday, February 1st.

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After the fires and a long hot summer, we find ourselves trying to find new ways to stay cool every day. This past weekend we decided to hike from Soda Springs Park through Manitou along Fountain Creek. What we saw along the way was equally refreshing—dozens of quaint bridges, otherwise inconspicuous murals, lovely mineral [...]

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The history of the Manitou Incline dates back to the early 1900s. Long gone are the cable cars that carried passengers up 2,000 vertical feet over a mile-long track. The rails are gone too. But remaining are the ties, which create a trail that’s become an incredibly popular outdoor exercise and recreation destination. Yet [...]

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As winter releases its hold on the region and gives way to warmer temperatures and the green leaves of spring, we thought it an appropriate time to visit the topic of Parks and Open Space.

You can hear listen to the full show here, or download by right-clicking this link.

You can also [...]

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(All photographs by Michael Myers except where indicated in the captions)

We in El Paso County have lots of incredible open space and, thanks to TOPS and the Trails and Open Space Coalition (TOSC), it may be our greatest treasure and our most enduring legacy. Red Rock Canyon and [...]

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What with all the hoopla surrounding the USA Pro Cycling Challenge we thought it’d be fun to offer, as a comparison, a couple of videos featuring the zenith of Colorado cycling in 1980, The Klunker Classic.

It’s hard to imagine Colorado without mountain bikes. The knobby-tired bicycles are so ubiquitous now that it seems [...]

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If one man is synonymous with the Colorado Rockies, it is Robert Ormes. Despite his profession as an English teacher at the Fountain Valley School and later as an English Professor at Colorado College, Ormes is most widely known for his contributions to Colorado Mountaineering via the publication of A Guide to [...]

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture says extreme drought conditions continue to expand over southern Colorado…Chaffee County Sheriff Pete Palmer says it’s a mystery why search teams have been unable to find two hikers who are missing on a trip…and, Colorado Springs City Council this week unanimously approved a decision to provide funding for reseeding [...]

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For photographer and avid hiker Matt Payne, hiking Colorado’s highest summits has become infinitely more than a conquest or “bucket list.” The creator of 100Summits.com, Payne picked up the love of “list” hiking from his father as a boy and turned it into an avocation. Using an unusual combination of ratings data [...]

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Cheyenne Mountain State Park played host to this past weekend’s Cheyenne Mountain Explosion professional mountain bike race, but the park also has its fair share of beginning and intermediate rides on well-maintained forest trails that offer fantastic up-close views of Pikes Peak granite on the south face of Cheyenne Mountain, which, [...]

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For photographer and avid hiker Matt Payne, hiking Colorado’s highest summits has become infinitely more than a conquest or “bucket list.” The creator of 100Summits.com, Payne picked up the love of “list” hiking from his father as a boy and turned it into an avocation. Using an unusual combination of ratings data [...]

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Spring Sign

On March 21, 2011 By

A few signs of Spring—along with the leftover bones of winter—revealed themselves among the rocks and red cedars in the gullies just north of Garden of the Gods this past weekend as the season made its official debut. Off the tourist path, the smaller treasures that surround Garden of the Gods are often its [...]

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Remembering Fred Schumm

On December 27, 2010 By

Last week, we learned of the recent passing of Fred Schumm, whom we had the great good fortune of interviewing earlier this year, at his home in Cherry Hills, NJ . Schumm, a Springs native, conceived of and built marvelously artful and one-of-a-kind playground sculptures for the parks in Colorado Springs.

Following World War [...]

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We say it a lot here on The Big Something: Our open spaces are our greatest local treasures. Who among us hasn’t enjoyed Red Rock Canyon or the newly added Section 16 at least once? Today, City Council will consider the purchase of the Anderson property, which would add 72 acres to the newly purchased Corral Bluffs open space just east of Colorado Springs.

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Williams Canyon Then & Now

On October 19, 2010 By

If you missed the aspens in the mountains, Fall is just getting started on the cottonwoods and gambel oaks in the lower elevations and the mild weather looks to hang on in the 60s through the weekend. This past weekend we went to one of our favorite in-town hikes: Williams Canyon.

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Last Friday, I joined the 4th and 5th grade classes from Buena Vista Elementary School for a field trip to the Fountain Creek Nature Center to see what we could see. And see we saw: butterflies, snakes, snails, birds, bugs, spiders and much more. If you haven’t been to the FCNC of late, or ever, do treat yourself to a couple of hours of and some time at the visitors center at any time of year.

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Ode to Section 16

On September 29, 2010 By

Yesterday, the Colorado Springs City Council approved the purchase of Section 16 from the State of Colorado, adding 640 acres of adjacent open space to the already remarkable Red Rock Canyon Open Space and the recently purchased White Acres, preserving for the community an inestimable treasure that will be a legacy for many generations to come. Local teacher and writer Eva Syrovy is a regular at Section 16 and wrote this essay, which accompanies the slide show above.

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When Klunkers Were King

On July 27, 2010 By

It’s hard to imagine Colorado without mountain bikes. The knobby-tired bicycles are so ubiquitous now that it seems almost impossible that there was a time when trails were mostly for hiking. It may also be hard for you to believe that mountain bikes were once called “balloon-tired klunkers” and that the people who rode them wore t-shirts and jeans or shorts instead of spandex/”Tron suits”.

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Following World War II, Colorado Springs native Fred Schumm enrolled in the Fine Arts Center where he met photographer Myron Wood. They became great friends and Myron documented Fred’s fantastical playground sculptures in Conejos and Boulder Crescent Parks. Craig Richardson spoke with Fred Schumm, now 85 and living in New Jersey, about the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Myron Wood and the playground sculptures he constructed while working for the city. Shortly after the sculptures in Conejos and Boulder Crescent parks were completed, Schumm was awarded a Fulbright Grant to study art in Italy.

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More than half-a-million people will ascend Pikes Peak by foot, bike, horse, train and automobile this summer. In 1873, Grace Greenwood, travel correspondent and the first female reporter on the New York Times‘ payroll, made the ascent by burro to the newly constructed signal station pictured above. In this first video you can listen to [...]

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People often ask us when we think we’ll run out of ideas for The Big Something. It’s a good question, and all things have beginnings, middles and ends. But without trying to sound cheeky, we truly believe there are an infinite number of ways to see things with new eyes every day without straining [...]

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(All photographs by Michael Myers except where indicated in the captions)

Probably the wisest thing my mother ever told me is this: At some point in your life you have to decide to focus on what you do have rather than what you don’t. And while this past year forced many of [...]

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News

April 1, 2015 | NPR · People who rely most on their smartphones to get online, often deal more frequently with service interruptions, because of financial hardship and data caps.
 

April 1, 2015 | NPR · The announcement to lift martial law goes into effect immediately. The new law, Article 44, gives coup leader Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha sweeping powers over the Thai government.
 

Getty Images
April 1, 2015 | NPR · Much of the state depends on that snow for its water. In the Central Valley, the nation’s most productive farming region, that means another year of fallowed fields and emergency water measures.
 

Arts & Life

Emli Bendixen
April 1, 2015 | NPR · Ronson’s new So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed looks at the ways social media shaming affects both the targets and those doing the shaming. Critic Eric Weiner calls it sharp-eyed and often hilarious.
 

April 1, 2015 | NPR · The multitalented filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky turns to fiction (sort of) with Where the Bird Sings Best, a semi-autobiographical novel that critic Juan Vidal calls “brilliant, mad, unpredictable.”
 

Courtesy of Flatiron Books
April 1, 2015 | NPR · “There are some lessons that only grief and responsibility can teach us,” says Weekend Edition host Scott Simon. His new memoir, Unforgettable, is about the life and death of his mother.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
April 1, 2015 | NPR · The international superstar puts social media in the cross hairs in his latest video. Watch this thought-provoking animated short from the director of The Triplets of Belleville.
 

Mountain Stage
April 1, 2015 | NPR · With its unique fusion of Western swing and hot jazz, the trio performs live in West Virginia.
 

Courtesy of the artist
April 1, 2015 | NPR · In the first taste of the band’s forthcoming Restless Ones, Heartless Bastards’ big, bluesy sound feels slick and streamlined, with choruses that get grander and grander as the song chugs along.
 

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