Southern Colorado is no stranger to the armed forces. With a collection of military installations, it’s not uncommon to see uniformed men and women around Colorado Springs and beyond. This month, we take a look at some of the issues concerning the military, from the very worst, to perhaps, some of the very best.

[...]

Continue Reading

Mountainside Pterodactyl

An innovative collaboration at Mountainside Elementary on base at Fort Carson is helping bring disparate parts of the Colorado Springs community together to make art.

Continue Reading

Dave Philipps Reading from Lethal Warriors

Dave Philipps Interview at KRCC

Local journalist and author Dave Philipps read at Colorado College from his book Lethal Warriors about the 506th Infantry Regiment (aka the Band of Brothers) at Fort Carson and the deadly results of a lack of effective support [...]

Continue Reading

Governor John Hickenlooper released his budget today and is proposing the highest cuts to K-12 schools the state has ever seen…Crews are working on cleaning up a rockslide on U.S. 50 that occurred yesterday (see photo above)…and, Army leaders will gather at Fort Carson tomorrow for a symposium on rear detachments.

(Image courtesy CDOT)

Continue Reading

An Army environmental study says Fort Carson is the best location for a new combat aviation brigade…The Colorado Department of Transportation and Trinidad city officials marked the opening of southbound Interstate 25 through the city today…and, the Colorado Oil and Gas Association has dropped its lawsuit challenging new rules to regulate the state’s energy industry.

Continue Reading

The acting commander at Fort Carson says the Army has no current plans to expand a 370-square-mile training site in southeastern Colorado…Republican state lawmakers say a federal judge’s decision to block a Colorado law affecting larger out-of-state, online retailers shows it’s unconstitutional and should be repealed…and, Senator Mark Udall has been appointed to the Senate’s [...]

Continue Reading

Army officials report suicide rates at Fort Carson continue to drop…and, the campaign to raise money to help repair Colorado’s capitol dome officially kicked off today.

Continue Reading

Coloradans are marking Martin Luther King, Jr. day with marches and parades as well as a rodeo…Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper is wrapping up his tour of the state in Limon and Loveland today as he talks to local officials, business leaders and residents about his economic plan…Electrical power to Fort Carson has been restored after [...]

Continue Reading

The state’s 68th general assembly kicked into gear today with lawmakers filling both legislative chambers…and, Fort Carson has broken ground on a new outpatient behavioral health clinic.

Continue Reading

Colorado Springs Congressman Doug Lamborn and Colorado Senator Mark Udall took part in a congressional briefing on the Warrior Transition Battalion at Fort Carson…The Colorado House approved a bill to create a committee this summer that could work with the federal government to resolve complaints between immigrant sheepherders and their employers…and, Aspen home prices also [...]

Continue Reading

[slideshow id=36]
The online retailer Amazon is cutting off affiliates that help it sell products in Colorado because of a new tax on online sales…Colorado Department of Transportation officials are on the scene of a rockslide along I-70 between Glenwood Springs and Dotsero…and, crews from Ft. Carson and El Paso County fire departments are [...]

Continue Reading

Authorities say a dummy artillery shell was found outside one of the gates at Fort Carson…State health officials say Colorado may have bypassed the annual seasonal flu period due to the H1N1, or swine flu, outbreak last fall…And, Xcel Energy announces a scheduled opening for their new power plant in Pueblo.

Continue Reading

The Army decides to stop pursuing an expansion of the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site, for now…and, Former state House Speaker Andrew Romanoff says he’s still running for the US Senate race, and has no plans to drop out or run for governor.

Continue Reading

Lawmakers from Colorado share thoughts after the President decides to increase troops in Afghanistan…and, Ft. Carson is expected to contribute a number of those additional soldiers.

Continue Reading

Round-Up

On November 18, 2009 By

Ft. Carson remembers fallen soldiers…Last year’s Salmonella outbreak in Alamosa is attributed to animal waste…and, Copper Mountain Resort faces a sale.

Continue Reading

Round-Up

On November 5, 2009 By

Ft. Carson reacts to the shootings at Ft. Hood…and, Focus on the Family contributes to out-of-state campaigns concerning same-sex marriage and civil unions.

Continue Reading

Round-Up

On October 26, 2009 By

A Colorado Springs group that aims to help Native Americans overcome alcoholism and other health issues wins a prize from a San Francisco think tank…two soldiers based at Ft. Carson have been killed in Afghanistan…Governor Ritter names a new head of the Colorado Department of Natural Resources….and, state lawmakers from the West meet in Wyoming [...]

Continue Reading

Round-Up

On September 14, 2009 By

Pueblo steelworkers approve a new contract…Governor Ritter says more cuts may be in store…a Fort Carson soldier dies in Baghdad…and, a soldier and his girlfriend missing in Pike National Forest are found.

Continue Reading

Round-Up

On June 26, 2009 By

The Army’s chief psychiatrist visits Ft. Carson…two fire departments consider consolidating…Governor Bill Ritter talks state budget, and more.

Continue Reading

Army Chief of Staff General George W. Casey, Jr. visits Ft. Carson, and the Secretary of Agriculture plans a visit to Colorado.

Continue Reading

Round-up

On April 20, 2009 By

Remembering Columbine, Fort Carson’s leader prepares to move on, and the Four Corners….that weren’t.

Continue Reading

In January, the United States Army lost more of its soldiers to suicide than to fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. Twenty-four January deaths are either confirmed or suspected suicides. That’s the most since the Army began tracking the statistic in 1980. Among the soldiers who killed themselves in January: a 27-year old Iraq veteran stationed [...]

Continue Reading

In January, the United States Army lost more of its soldiers to suicide than to fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. Twenty-four January deaths are either confirmed or suspected suicides. That’s the most since the Army began tracking the statistic in 1980. Among the soldiers who killed themselves in January: a 27-year old Iraq [...]

Continue Reading

News

December 19, 2014 | NPR · A framework for measuring opportunity –and outcomes.
 

December 19, 2014 | NPR · Many business books try to help you get rich quick. But three of 2014′s biggest sellers focused on unfairness and inequality. Economists say expect more: Books on inequality are riding a huge wave.
 

AP
December 19, 2014 | NPR · The State Department says a delegation of diplomats will visit the island next month. The formal restoration of diplomatic ties is expected to be as easy as the two countries writing each other notes.
 

Arts & Life

The Weinstein Company
December 19, 2014 | NPR · Walter Keane made his name with wistful paintings of big-eyed children — paintings actually done by his wife. Tim Burton directs and Amy Adams stars in Big Eyes, a new movie about the Keanes.
 

iStockphoto
December 19, 2014 | NPR · Pearl shares the books she loved this year that you might not have heard of. Her list includes a Hollywood satire, two thrillers, a young adult novel and a nonfiction book about World War I.
 

Film Movement
December 18, 2014 | NPR · The film If You Don’t, I Will has some strong dialogue and performances, but its tale of a marriage in peril sags too often in its recounting of the journey.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
December 18, 2014 | WXPN · We speak with the head of Nacional Records about three essential latin alternative songs.
 

Courtesy of the artist
December 18, 2014 | WXPN · David Dye sits down with Andrew Savage and Austin Brown to discuss their prolific year.
 

December 18, 2014 | NPR · Cuban rhythms and melodies have been part of what’s been called the most American of art forms — jazz — ever since Jelly Roll Morton first heard them in the port of New Orleans and used them in his music. Josephine Baker performed in Cuba and Nat King Cole recorded there. But the revolution made cultural exchange all but impossible and even supposedly open-minded artists and musicians took sides.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab