Antoine Predock‘s Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center has received an equal share of love and lumps for the cavernous amounts of space and labyrinthine walkways in its belly. Like it or lump it, we found the space to be a perfect launch site to test paper airplane designs one recent [...]

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Even when he was a young boy, Jonboy Meyers knew he wanted to draw comics and had a talent for it. The son of a Military Policeman, he grew up in Colorado Springs reading war comics and drawing constantly. Eventually, he discovered Captain America and superheroes and thought his destiny was sealed.

But [...]

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Warm days like today provide us with that hastening toward Springtime feeling, though we know we’re not yet safely out of Winter’s cold embrace, our spirits our kindled with a sense of exploration and dreams of adventure.  Because we’ve not yet shed the cocoon of cold time lethargy enough to embark on a new adventure [...]

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In the late 19th Century, the residents of Colorado Springs celebrated the fertility of their thriving new city by festooning themselves and all manner of their conveyances with flowers. The Flower Parade marched the streets of downtown Colorado Springs from 1893 to 1912, when it was transformed into a more “Cowboys and Indians” type [...]

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Remembering Fred Schumm

On December 27, 2010 By

Last week, we learned of the recent passing of Fred Schumm, whom we had the great good fortune of interviewing earlier this year, at his home in Cherry Hills, NJ . Schumm, a Springs native, conceived of and built marvelously artful and one-of-a-kind playground sculptures for the parks in Colorado Springs.

Following World War [...]

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The Scoop on Brian Nemeth

On December 13, 2010 By

If you’ve ever walked more than half-a-block through downtown Colorado Springs in the past decade, you’ve likely been approached (or accosted) by one of Colorado Springs’ greatest characters: Brian Nemeth. A self-styled poet and aspiring news anchor, Nemeth relentlessly peddles his raunchy and frequently belligerent poems and opinions as one-sheet photocopied handouts for a [...]

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If one Internet year = about 10 pre-Internet years, then 1993 was about 170 years ago and it really feels that way when you listen to this very first public radio broadcast over the Internet for Science Friday. Remember 9600 bps dial-up terminals, electronic messages, graphical interfaces, the data superhighway, virtual multi-user dungeons (MUDs), and information anxiety? Hop aboard the public radio time machine!

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Stratton's Streetcars

On November 23, 2010 By

In this slide show of images from the Pikes Peak Library District’s Digital Photography Archive with text by Marshall Sprague from his history of the region, “Newport in the Rockies” (read by Craig Richardson), we hope you’ll catch a glimpse of Colorado Springs’ former public transportation glory as it was funded by millionaire gold king Winfield Scott Stratton.

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An Elf at Work

On November 22, 2010 By

It’s almost Black Friday and we thought you might like to see these two slide shows of one of Colorado Springs’ greatest elves’ work. Before becoming a renowned sculptor of playful, toy-like objects, Sean O’Meallie designed and made toys.

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An early (and lighthearted) documentarian of life in Old Colorado City in the early 20th Century, Ira Current was born in Colorado Springs October 30, 1910. He developed a keen interest in photography when he was 16 years old which would soon lead him to a job with Stewart Brothers photo finishing in Colorado Springs. In 1928, shortly after his graduation from Colorado Springs High School (now Palmer High School) he used the salary he earned at Stewart’s ($5 a week) to purchase a Cine Kodak, the first amateur film camera produced, for $25, a tripod for $25 and two hundred feet of film for $5 and produced his first film, “Four Wheels”, a chronicle of soap box style races, inspired by the Pikes Peak Hill Climb, near the Garden of the Gods.

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Columnist, former City Councilman and Colorado Springs native son John Hazlehurst is a vast trove of local history and one of the city’s most colorful raconteurs. Craig Richardson and Noel Black sat down with him to record some of his more vivid memories of his political life as a member of City Council and protege of then-Mayor Bob Isaac from 1991 to 1997. Among the highlights of these anecdotes: a possible lost opportunity to have averted TABOR, how Mary Lou Makepeace stole his thunder, and sage words from the liquored-up lips of Mayor Bob.

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Whether you like or appreciate the musicianship of this brand of metal, you’d think the fact that Jag Panzer is probably the biggest band ever to come out of Colorado Springs (in terms of album sales and international fame—see interview below) would earn them some modicum of respect here in the Pikes Peak region. Alas, few have even heard of them.

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Blessing of the Furries

On October 6, 2010 By

Every year at around this time, Grace-St. Stephens Episcopal Church holds its Blessing of the Pets in memory of St. Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of pets. Last year was the first time the parish held the event since returning to the church building at 601 N. Tejon after the much publicized split within the congregation in 2007. This year’s blessing will be held today at 5:30 p.m and all are welcome. In case you’re wondering what to expect, we went last year and put together this audio slide show.

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Theatre ‘d Art’s Jonathan Margheim & Brian Mann Embettered by KRCC

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Stick Work

On September 8, 2010 By

Internationally acclaimed artist Patrick Dougherty, the man behind the “stick huts” on the Colorado College campus at the northeast corner of Cache la Poudre and Cascade in Colorado Springs, has just been featured in the latest issue of People Magazine and has just published a book. We spoke with Dougherty during the creation of his piece on the CC campus.

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We can always count on the Pikes Peak Public Library District for some amazingly campy old Alexander Film Company commercials shot locally. These two reels of 7-Up commercials shot in and around the Pikes Peak region offer a “lively and sparkly” taste of a more innocent, yet glamorous time in our recent past. See you there!

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Pueblo’s Arkansas Levee mural is a great example of how something widely perceived as negative (graffiti, in this case) can be turned into a cultural opportunity. At 3-miles long and growing, it is (according to the Guiness Book of World Records) the world’s longest continuous painting.

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Is summer over? Let’s hang on a little longer with this slide show of the Manitou Penny Arcade’s unofficial museum of stencil art set to an audio collage of sounds from the games.

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Westside Gingerbread

On August 5, 2010 By

One of the great aesthetic pleasures of Colorado Springs’ West Side is the dizzying array of brightly colored gingerbread in the eves of many of its old Victorian-era homes. We went out to capture some of the gaudy (in the best sense!) colors that add to the Westside’s many charms.

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If you’ve never been to the county fair, you’re missing out on a living tradition rich in the history and knowledge to which all of us are still tied in some form by the food we eat and the agrarian traditions that make all of our lives possible. Of course it’s far more than just a celebration of the animal husbandry and the skills of country living; the county fair is rides and funnel cakes and shows and … fun!

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When Klunkers Were King

On July 27, 2010 By

It’s hard to imagine Colorado without mountain bikes. The knobby-tired bicycles are so ubiquitous now that it seems almost impossible that there was a time when trails were mostly for hiking. It may also be hard for you to believe that mountain bikes were once called “balloon-tired klunkers” and that the people who rode them wore t-shirts and jeans or shorts instead of spandex/”Tron suits”.

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An Entomologist's Xanadu

On July 19, 2010 By

You’ve driven past it dozens of times, if not hundreds: the giant Hercules Beetle on Hwy 115 just south of Colorado Springs next to the sign for the May Natural History Museum of the Tropics. And you, like me, probably thought it was a hokey roadside attraction. And so you drove past year after year after year until one day you decide to see what it’s all about for a little staycaytion and….

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Pride Fest Turns 20!

On July 15, 2010 By

The 20th (that’s right, 20!) annual Pride Fest is this Sunday, July 18 at Acacia Park from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The parade will beginning at 11 a.m. and cruise down Tejon Street from Colorado College until it hits the park. KRCC will be there again this year to take photos and video, so come find us. Don’t miss our slide show from last year’s Pride Fest.

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News

Flickr
August 31, 2014 | NPR · Alarmed by the rapid decline of wild salmon populations, a company has invented a novel way to help migratory fish over blocked rivers. It uses air pressure to fire them out of a cannon.
 

August 30, 2014 | NPR · American and other forces have launched an offensive to free the town of Amerli, surrounded by Islamic militants for more than two months and desperately short on food and clean water.
 

Tommy Trenchard for NPR
August 30, 2014 | NPR · NPR producer Nicole Beemsterboer reflects on 10 days in Liberia: children losing parents, young men risking their lives to collect bodies, and the smell of chlorinated hand-washing water everywhere.
 

Arts & Life

Paul Stuart
August 31, 2014 | NPR · The plotting in Mitchell’s new novel isn’t quite as complex as in previous works, but it takes an abrupt turn into dystopian fantasy towards the end. “It’s what the book wanted to be,” he tells NPR.
 

Redferns
August 30, 2014 | NPR · What makes an essential rock song? Musicologist Greil Marcus argues that it’s not the stature of the performer, but the degree to which a song tells the story of rock ‘n’ roll itself.
 

Discovery Channel
August 30, 2014 | NPR · Networks like the Discovery Channel have been criticized for pushing entertainment at the cost of science, with fake “documentaries” about everything from mermaids to mythical monster sharks.
 

Music

Redferns
August 30, 2014 | NPR · What makes an essential rock song? Musicologist Greil Marcus argues that it’s not the stature of the performer, but the degree to which a song tells the story of rock ‘n’ roll itself.
 

Courtesy of the artist
August 30, 2014 | NPR · The tuba was the first bass instrument in jazz, until it was replaced by the string bass. For nearly 50 years, Bob Stewart has been trying to carve out a new niche for his instrument in modern jazz.
 

Courtesy of the artist
August 30, 2014 | NPR · As a student at Princeton, D’Amato was mentored in his songwriting by professor and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Paul Muldoon.
 

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