We were excited to hear that the gorgeous stained glass windows at Grace-St. Stephens Episcopal Church in downtown Colorado Springs, which we’ve featured here on The Big Something in the slide show above, are now the subject of a new coffee table book by parishoners Spot Holmes, Chrys Hutka, Phyllis Kester,Marianna McJimsey, and […]

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We were invited inside the Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station (often mistakenly referred to as NORAD, which conducts some of its operations inside the mountain), but weren’t allowed to take pictures. The Air Force did, however, give us a disc full of seldom-seen historic construction images without captions and some publicity photos, including photos of […]

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Van Briggle Building Up Close

On September 14, 2011 By

Designed by Dutch architect Nicolaas van den Arend, the Van Briggle Pottery building at the corner of Uintah and Glen Avenue is a spectacular example of Flemish farmouse/Arts and Crafts styles and has a wide array of Van Briggle tiles and pottery incorporated into the structure, which were once meant to advertise the signature […]

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Charles and Bee

On September 8, 2011 By


In 1970, under the leadership of Bee Vradenburg, the Colorado Springs Symphony hired Charles Ansbacher as its new conductor and music director. At that time the symphony was nary a glimmer of what it would become with Vradenburg and Ansbacher at the helm over the next 20 years. This Friday, a free […]

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Miniature Golf Microcosm

On August 31, 2011 By

As the recession wears on we revisit a recently abandoned putt putt golf course in central Colorado Springs that serves as a microcosmic metaphor for how quickly even the grandest of civilizations can crumble. Like a disposable ghost town or a gross parody of Shelley’s “Ozymandias,” this good-times golf course has suffered the […]

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If you ever find your mind wondering about the histories of some of the neat old buildings you encounter whilst wandering about town, you may find those pangs of wonderment satiated in this third edition of Brief Histories of Beautiful Buildings. Once again, Tim Scanlon gently guides us through Colorado Springs’ past to uncover the […]

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Tim Scanlon, retired Colorado Springs city employee who worked in support of the Historic Preservation Board, shares a brief history of a few of Colorado Springs’ most notable historic buildings. If you missed the first part in this series, you can view it by clicking HERE.


(“The Exchange National Bank” photographer […]

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One of the most beautiful towns in Southern Colorado is undoutedly San Luis. Though it’s situated at 8,000 feet in high desert, the acequias (traditional water canals, which we’ll feature in our August episode of Western Skies) keep it a lush green in summer, which provides stark contrast to the arid hills above. Those […]

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On our recent road trip to Southern Colorado and New Mexico, we stopped in at the always-lovely Taos Pueblo. While the Pueblo’s architecture itself is the more obvious star, we found ourselves taken with the beautiful Hornos, or outdoor adobe ovens. Aside from the fact that they’re fantastically simple and efficient ways of cooking, […]

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Like any great work of art or architecture, Bishop Castle is a pleasure to visit on many (any) levels. Jim Bishop, its architect and namesake, and his caricaturistic anti-heroism has enough negative capability for all the Romantics put together, and his screeds are usually part of the sauce. But on a recent visit, […]

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While the 1980s introduced luxurious large homes for middle-income families, the tide is turning, in a big, or rather, small way. Across the country tiny homes are being built, some as small as 65-square-feet. Many are vacation homes, tiny cabins set on a choice piece of land, but some homeowners have turned to tiny homes […]

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Big Something intern Ruby Kimberly put together this look back at Drop City—frequently cited as the first artist/hippy commune—in Trinidad, Colorado. Kimberly writes:

In passing through the region surrounding Trinidad, CO today, one encounters a vast expanse of arid and sparsely populated land where, for a brief moment in the 1960s and 70s, became […]

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The Old North End of Colorado Springs is a treasure trove of turn-of-the-20th-Century architectural gems that local authors Jennifer Wendler Lovell and Robert Loevy have researched and documented in their new book Exploring the Old North End of Colorado Springs – A Guide to its History and Architecture.

We spoke with them about […]

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In this second installment of our Historic Preservation Month series in collaboration with the Colorado Springs Historic Preservation Alliance we speak with Tim Scanlon, retired Colorado Springs city employee who worked in support of the Historic Preservation Board. Scanlon will lead a Central Downtown Walking Tour of historic downtown buildings this Sunday, May 15 […]

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Antoine Predock‘s Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center has received an equal share of love and lumps for the cavernous amounts of space and labyrinthine walkways in its belly. Like it or lump it, we found the space to be a perfect launch site to test paper airplane designs one recent […]

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News

Smithsonian Institute
May 5, 2016 | NPR · The 1996 discovery of Kennewick Man, one of the oldest North American human skeletons ever found, erupted in an unprecedented fight between scientists and Native American beliefs.
 

AP
May 5, 2016 | NPR · On paper, the USDA’s plan to send surplus peanuts to feed 140,000 malnourished Haitian schoolchildren sounds heroic. But aid groups say it could devastate Haiti’s peanut farmers.
 

Getty images
May 5, 2016 | NPR · The Colorado city and the American Civil Liberties Union of Colorado have announced a settlement that will end the practice. The city will even give payouts to people who were wrongly sent to jail.
 

Arts & Life

Marvel
May 5, 2016 | NPR · Captain America: Civil War drops some of the politics of the comics on which it’s based, but it tells a different, equally current political story.
 

May 5, 2016 | NPR · Basma Abdel Aziz’s new novel is set in an unspecified Middle Eastern city, where an endless line snakes back from the mysterious Gate where citizens await pronouncements from a sinister government.
 

AP
May 5, 2016 | NPR · The Pulitzer Prize-winning author says his blue-collar grandfather would have been astonished by the life Russo leads. His new book, Everybody’s Fool, is a sequel to 1993’s Nobody’s Fool.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
May 5, 2016 | NPR · The Dead brings together the blues, the Bible and a dramatic tale of passion and power in an electrifying, unreleased performance.
 

Courtesy of the artist
May 5, 2016 | NPR · Nothing’s new album follows a tumultuous period in the band members’ lives. Its 10 songs delve into anxiety and addiction, mental illness and mortality, while channeling anguish into catharsis.
 

Courtesy of the artist
May 5, 2016 | NPR · On Rae’s third album, the singer-songwriter’s fleshed-out jams and delicate, jazz-informed ballads examine the subtle trajectories emotions can take.
 

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