The wearable technology, which is being tested by a select group of users, was used to record an arrest on the Jersey Shore. The incident raises questions about citizen journalism and the limits of privacy in public.

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The rock found in Morocco was even weirder than it looked. The olive green chunk, speckled with white and brown, has chemical and physical properties similar to the planet Mercury. But some experts doubt that the 4.56-billion-year-old meteorite is from the planet closest to our sun.

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An obscure tax provision crafted for drug dealers is giving state-licensed medical marijuana dispensaries a headache. Federal income tax rates for dispensaries in Colorado can soar to 70 percent because businesses can’t claim certain deductions. It’s a policy the industry is trying to change.

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Building huge turbine farms too close together might significantly reduce their power, some atmospheric scientists say. The problem is “wind shadow” — the turbulence created by one big cluster of turbines that steals wind from another cluster down the road.

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Pentagon officials say they’re opening ground combat jobs to women as a matter of equality. But the military also needs them because the number of military-age men who qualify for service is declining.

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Some Colorado doctors who’ve treated victims of recent mass shootings and everyday gun violence say they’re deeply disturbed by and opposed to guns. But other doctors don’t support the new gun restrictions lawmakers are talking about in Denver and Washington, D.C.

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Wyoming has the highest suicide rate in the U.S., and two thirds of the state’s suicides are by firearm. Like much of the West, Wyoming’s gun ownership rates are high, and gun culture is strong. The state’s relationship with guns has made suicide prevention efforts tough, but that may be changing.

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What if a gun could only be fired by its rightful owner? What if it recognized a grip or fingerprint, or communicated with a special ring? It’s been a fantasy for years, and in the wake of the Sandy Hook tragedy, so-called smart gun technology is back in the spotlight.

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But it’s likely that the Higgs Boson, a subatomic particle thought to give everything its mass, will be known by the moniker for a long time, Dick Teresi explained.

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U.S. and other NATO troops are spending less time fighting the Taliban and more time making local Afghan governments self-sufficient. It’s a slow process.

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The Department of Veterans Affairs doesn’t track how many free gun locks it gives out or whether they’re even effective. Rather, the devices are viewed as a stalling technique in the event a veteran picks up a gun in a moment of crisis.

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Early March is when Yosemite National Park officials would normally be gearing up for the busy tourist season. Instead, they’re figuring out how to cut $1.5 million from their budget because of the recent sequestration that forced across-the-board cuts. The National Park Service must now cut $134 million from sites around the country.

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Marijuana proponents in Washington state have talked of a “gold rush” as the state transitions to a legal, licensed marijuana industry. But uncertainty about state rules and potential federal intervention have made pursuing opportunities in the industry a high-risk business proposition.

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Federal health officials warned that a dangerous group of superbugs has become increasingly common in hospitals throughout the past decade. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the bacteria are resistant to virtually all antibiotics, including the ones doctors use as a last-ditch option.

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More than 2 feet of snow hit the high plains this week, snarling travel and all but shutting down some cities. Despite those hassles, for farmers and ranchers, the snow brings some urgently needed moisture to their drought-stricken fields and pastures.

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U.S. Army Spc. Tyler Jeffries lost both legs in a roadside bombing last October in Afghanistan, and he has been learning to walk on prosthetic legs. But Jeffries was determined to meet his buddies when they returned from duty in January.

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North Korea’s latest nuclear weapons test is much more powerful than the previous two, according to estimates made by instruments that measure seismic waves from the blast. But it’s hard to verify North Korea’s claim that the test was of a miniaturized nuclear weapon.

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News

AFP/Getty Images
April 24, 2014 | NPR · Simon Ostrovsky, a reporter for VICE News, was seized at gunpoint by masked men in the city of Slovyansk earlier this week. He is reportedly safe and in good health.
 

AP
April 24, 2014 | NPR · Vermont is the first state to pass a law requiring GMO labeling, and other states are close behind. But a federal lawmaker recently introduced a bill that would outlaw state rules like Vermont’s.
 

San Francisco Maritime National Historic Park K01.2.571PL
April 24, 2014 | NPR · The City of Chester, which went down in 1888 after colliding with a liner, has been found. At the time, false reports that the other ship’s Chinese crew failed to assist stoked racial hatred.
 

Arts & Life

April 24, 2014 | NPR · Debbie Allen won Fame for playing an iconic dance teacher in film and television. Now, she’s getting new fans for roles on shows like Grey’s Anatomy. She talks about the highs and lows of her career.
 

Twentieth Century Fox
April 24, 2014 | NPR · A film that seems designed to demonstrate the dire circumstances in which funny women can still find themselves, The Other Woman is a grotesque pantomime of female empowerment.
 

Courtesy of Ogilvy Brazil
April 24, 2014 | NPR · Kids don’t want to look different, especially if the reason they look different is because they’ve lost their hair to chemotherapy. If Hello Kitty’s gone bald, too, maybe it won’t feel so bad.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
April 24, 2014 | NPR · Even today’s musicians know jazz has a rapidly-changing, living, breathing history. In a new video, young gun Kris Bowers takes a YouTube tour from ragtime and stride through the present day.
 

Courtesy of the artist
April 24, 2014 | NPR · The video for The Darcys’ powerful song “Hunting” shows the dark side of life in an apartment building that echoes the Hitchcock film Rear Window, using subtly beautiful CGI and matte paintings.
 

Rich Fury
April 24, 2014 | NPR · Can you tell what a band’s music will sound like, just by the shoes they wear? All Songs Considered host Bob Boilen thinks you can.
 

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