The president is trying to regain traction for federal gun control measures by visiting states that are moving forward on their own. Today he speaks in Colorado, where public outrage in the wake of mass shootings helped propel new legislation — and where opponents are promising political payback.

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The editor in chief of Newsweek and the Daily Beast, joins NPR’s Steve Inskeep to talk about women taking on big cultural challenges, and the stories of how they got there.

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The North’s move to block South Korean workers from getting to a jointly run factory is a familiar way for the communist state to show its displeasure. But it comes at a time when tensions are as high as they’ve been in years. And the North’s new leader is inexperienced at this diplomatic game.

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Morning Edition checks in with the singer-songwriter as she finishes the follow-up to 2009′s Middle Cyclone, due out later this year.

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When it comes to collecting Social Security benefits, there is no magic age. Today’s boomers can begin collecting full benefits at 66, tap in early at 62 or delay benefits until 70. Mary Beth Franklin of Investment News says the importance of making a smart decision on timing “can’t be underestimated.”

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Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn., is spending $100 million to open a medical school in the fall of 2013. Its goal is to have over 50 percent of its graduates go into primary care.

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While being forced to tick a single box for “race” has never been a problem for George Washington III, who is black, his mixed-race children see it differently. And for Dave Kung, being allowed to check two races on the U.S. Census form for the first time prompted an unexpected outpouring of emotion.

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A study found that 1 in 5 adults ages 20 to 55 who survive strokes will die within 20 years of the event — a rate much higher than doctors expected. The findings mean doctors need to pay a lot more attention to younger stroke survivors.

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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency could soon issue a final ruling that aims to force oil companies to replace E-10, gasoline mixed with 10 percent ethanol, with E-15. This move could come just as widespread support for ethanol, which is made from corn, appears to be eroding.

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Pakistan’s isolated Swat Valley is ground zero for a quiet experiment by the Pakistani army: a little-known program aimed at re-educating thousands of young men who were taken in by the Taliban. Using international funds and a contingent of army officers, Pakistan is trying to turn would-be terrorists into law-abiding citizens.

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Winter Morning Walks, an album featuring jazz composer Maria Schneider and soprano Dawn Upshaw, revolves around meditations on nature and beauty by former U.S. Poet Laureate Ted Kooser. All three artists have had battles with cancer — when, Schneider says, “everything in life becomes heightened.”

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Expressing regret may grease the social wheels, but not doing so boosts your sense of power, control and self-worth. Try explaining that to your boss.

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The Syrian provincial capital of Raqqa is the first city to fall entirely to rebels who are fighting to bring down President Bashar Assad’s regime. We have the story of Mohammad Abdel Aziz, who witnessed the fall of Raqqa from inside a prison cell.

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A government study of the medical records of 1,000 kids found no correlation between the number of vaccines a child received and his or her risk of autism spectrum disorder. Experts hope the finding will allay some parents who worry that many vaccines on one day or in the first two years of life may lead to autism.

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The renowned chef may be famous for his Michelin-star-winning restaurants, but he also runs a string of gourmet bakeries. He shares some favorite confections for Easter, with recipes for hot cross buns, marshmallow eggs and carrot muffins.

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Dawn Maestas helps women who have been branded with tattoos as a result of domestic violence.

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Researchers are using cellular machinery to turn E. coli bacteria into little computers. By creating on/off switches that are similar to electrictronic transistors, scientists can control each microbe’s behavior.

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Smoked salmon pastrami may sound heretical, but owners of a revisionist Jewish deli in Washington, D.C., say it’s all part of a revival of traditional Jewish cuisine.

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How do oysters attach themselves to rocks? They need a glue, but a glue that can set in a watery environment. In this installment of “Joe’s Big Idea,” NPR’s Joe Palca reports that glue could lead to medical advances.

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The court’s final day of arguments involving same-sex marriage laws served up some memorable observations. Here are five key questions that came up as the justices debated the constitutionality of the federal Defense of Marriage Act.

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Overlooked by the industry, Bay Area rappers as different as E-40, Too Short and The Coup were free to make and sell music that didn’t sound like anybody else’s.

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The IMF says that price of gasoline in the U.S. covers the cost of producing and distribution gasoline but it doesn’t reflect the costs that gasoline consumption imposes on society — in the form of traffic, congestion, pollution and global warming. Linda Wertheimer talks to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, about a new IMF report on energy subsidies.

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Like some other big cities around the world, New Delhi has train cars reserved for women only. The female riders say it offers them a secure way to commute, but they argue that the larger problem is male attitudes.

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