The Middle Distance 6.14.13: When the Lights Come Up
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For the last six weeks, I’ve been taking a crash course in documentary filmmaking. I thought I’d be learning some technical terminology, a little technique, and a bit about how funding, marketing and distribution […]

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Lacey Carter’s colorful work is eye catching, which is exactly what E11 Creative workshop for Children needs. Founders Maria and Alaine Navaratne collaborated with Lacey to help boosting their presence in Mountain Shadows. Using spray paint and blue tape, Lacey and her partner Rob are finishing the project today. Keep an eye out for […]

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The Middle Distance 5.24.13: At Their Own Hands
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As Memorial Day approaches, far too many American families are not thinking about what they’ll cook on the grill, but how they will remember their military dead, particularly the growing number who died at their own […]

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Colorado College student Sarah Kelsey worked with Jessica Hunter-Larsen, curator of the IDEA space, and a fellow student, Jeffrey Moore, to curate an exhibit of one-time CC Professor Robert Adams’ photographs documenting the West’s changing landscape. Born in New Jersey in 1937, Adams spent part of his childhood in Denver, only returning to Colorado […]

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While joking with the NPR folks is always fun, our own public radio mugs deserve another look. Our special Henson H915 camera reveals our inner Muppet or Sesame Street character for your enjoyment. Maybe they’ll make you laugh…or just make you pitiful. Either way, we hope you’ll keep allowing us to make public […]

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It’s hard to imagine that a person who makes books would be glad that the author and book are dead. But such is the “strang” world of Aaron Cohick, The Printer of The Press at Colorado College and the proprietor of the New Lights Press. (The title of the show, as it were, comes […]

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The Middle Distance 3.1.13: I Spy
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When I was 9, I decided to be a spy. This was not what I wanted to be when I grew up, but right then and there, in my sleepy, southern Kentucky hometown where it seemed nothing ever […]

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News

AP
March 27, 2017 | NPR · The president showed little interest in policy details. If he continues to focus superficially on getting a win instead of learning, Republicans warn that his priorities will continue to be derailed.
 

Marisa Penaloza/NPR
March 27, 2017 | NPR · The Zika virus may have infected more than one million people in Puerto Rico, including thousands of pregnant women. Doctors are watching babies born to infected moms who don’t show birth defects.
 

March 27, 2017 | NPR · Rep. Ted Deutch, the top Democrat on the House Ethics Committee, is calling for an independent investigation into Russia’s alleged ties to the Trump campaign and White House.
 

Arts & Life

March 27, 2017 | NPR · Emma Donoghue tackles a tough topic with light and humor in The Lotterys Plus One, her new kids’ book about a boisterous blended family learning to accommodate a difficult grandfather with dementia.
 

March 26, 2017 | NPR · Bruce Feiler speaks about his new book, “The First Love Story,” and how the story of Adam and Eve is still important to relationships between men and women today.
 

March 26, 2017 | NPR · Deb Olin Unferth’s story collection delights in going in unexpected directions, and her sensitively-drawn characters feel the full, real, often contradictory and uneasy layering of human emotion.
 

Music

Courtesy of Polk and Co.
March 26, 2017 | NPR · With 18 new shows — half of them musicals — opening this March and April, just before Tony nominations are announced, producers have to take risks to get their shows to stand out.
 

Courtesy of the artist
March 26, 2017 | NPR · The singer-songwriter entered NPR Music’s contest with the song “¿Cómo Hacer?” She says it expresses her emotions about being unable to return to her family back home in Mexico.
 

Getty Images
March 25, 2017 | NPR · Charley Pride, one of the first African-American stars in country music, has sold more records for RCA than anyone not named Elvis Presley.
 

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