Forecasters say the storm over the Waldo Canyon burn scar yesterday that produced flash flooding through Williams Canyon was quick-moving and dropped six-tenths of an inch of rain in about 15 minutes. KRCC’s Andrea Chalfin has more.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Manitou Springs city officials were quick to praise education efforts and first-responder cooperation, but Police Chief Joe Ribeiro acknowledged the city’s warning siren didn’t work correctly.

“I personally went out to the siren to attempt to launch it yesterday. It did not launch. I’m not able to tell you right now whether it was human error, whether it was me that failed, or whether it was the system, but it is one of my tasks today to get that tested and see what the problem was and make sure it’s ready for next time.”

Ribeiro says right now they’re focusing primarily on clearing drainages and there’s no timeline for completion. He adds that the burned landscape means a change in runoff conditions. That can affect how well the culverts handle water and debris. Ribeiro calls yesterday a “good test,” but also issued a warning.

“We had a number of curiosity seekers who were actually moving toward the flash flood waters during our warning and during the event. After the event, we saw people standing, playing, and working in the debris. Please know that flash flood waters are extremely dangerous, and rise very quickly. We also have a propensity for secondary events. So just because the flash flood comes and the waters recede does not mean that that’s actually the end.”

No injuries have been reported, though more than a dozen buildings and some cars were affected by yesterday’s flooding.

 

Comments are closed.

News

May 27, 2017 | NPR · Harvard Business School professor Mihir Desai says the unemployment rate is the lowest its been in a decade. He speaks with NPR’s Michel Martin about the increasing options for recent graduates.
 

May 27, 2017 | NPR · Listen to some advice offered to the Class of 2017 from speakers, including Hillary Clinton at Wellesley College, Vice President Mike Pence at the U.S. Naval Academy and actor Will Ferrell at USC.
 

May 27, 2017 | NPR · NPR’s Michel Martin talks with Southern Poverty Law Center Intelligence Project Director Heidi Beirich about raised concerns of an increase in hate crimes after stabbings in Maryland and Oregon.
 

Arts & Life

Courtesy of WBUR
May 27, 2017 | WBUR · Dear Sugar Radio is a podcast offering “radical empathy” and advice for the lost, lonely and heartsick. Today the hosts hear from people who have estranged themselves from their parents.
 

May 27, 2017 | NPR · Singer-songwriter Gregg Allman of The Allman Brothers Band died on Saturday at the age of 69. Music journalist Amanda Petrusich takes a look back at Allman’s legacy with NPR’s Michel Martin.
 

May 27, 2017 | NPR · In this week’s Barbershop, NPR’s Michel Martin talks about upcoming offerings in summer entertainment with humor writer Luvvie Ajayi, journalist Kara Brown of Jezebel and NPR’s Eric Deggans.
 

Music

Getty Images
May 27, 2017 | NPR · One of the most recognizable voices of his generation, Allman was one of the namesakes of a band that pioneered Southern rock — yet his music was always haunted by a sense of mortality and loss.
 

Courtesy of the artist
May 27, 2017 | NPR · On his breakthrough debut album, American Teen, Khalid Robinson proves that the emotional turbulence of youth can be timeless. Michel Martin talks to him and his biggest influence: his mom.
 

Getty Images
May 27, 2017 | NPR · Allman, a founding member of the Allman Brothers Band, died at his home in Savannah, Georgia.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab