Search and rescue crews found the body of Randy Udall yesterday, in Wyoming’s Wind River mountain range. The Carbondale resident was brother to U.S. Senator Mark Udall and well known for his work on environmental issues. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has this remembrance.

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Randy Udall was known in Colorado and across the nation for his work as an advocate for energy sustainability. He was the cofounder and original director of the Roaring Fork Valley-based Community Office for Resource Efficiency, or CORE, which promotes renewable energy and energy efficiency. He wrote his first article on climate change in 1987 and helped usher in Colorado’s first solar energy incentive program.

In March of 2012, he spoke about natural gas development in western Colorado in Aspen.

“My concern is more social and where do we draw these lines, I have driven through Rifle and Parachute 100 times in my life, and over the last 5 years, I would think, ‘my god,’ and I didn’t get involved. But, now that it’s going to be out in my backyard, I’m certainly going to get involved.”

A statement from Udall’s family said he “left this earth doing what he loved most: hiking in his most favorite mountain range in the world.”

Searchers found Udall’s body in a remote area of the Wind River Range in western Wyoming. The experienced hiker had been out on a solo trek. Although an autopsy is forthcoming, it appears he died of natural causes.

 

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