The new Charles Bunnell exhibit at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center isn’t dazzling. But it is amazing! Bunnell was a hugely important figure in the history of the Broadmoor Academy and tended to absorb all of his influences with a fluidity of style the both imitated and expanded beyond them. What you get from the show, more than anything, is a broad overview of just a slice of the amazing work that was being done here in the Pikes Peak region during the first half of the 20th Century. And if you weren’t aware that was going on, then this show is a great place to start. Here’s a taste of some of the aesthetic changes from landscape to abstraction that he went through in his career:

Charles Bunnell, "Abstract Cityscape," 1951, oil on board. Collection of Cyrus Moffett.

Charles Bunnell, “Abstract Cityscape,” 1951, oil on board. Collection of Cyrus Moffett.

Charles Bunnell, "Contrasts," 1928, oil on canvas. Collection of James and Virginia Moffett

Charles Bunnell, “Contrasts,” 1928, oil on canvas. Collection of James and Virginia Moffett

Charles Bunnell, "Indian Dancers," 1954, Oil on board. Collection of the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Gift of the Area Arts Foundation, Amarillo, Texas, FA1972.98

Charles Bunnell, “Indian Dancers,” 1954, Oil on board. Collection of the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Gift of the Area Arts Foundation, Amarillo, Texas, FA1972.98

Charles Bunnell, "Peace," 1961, oil on canvas. Collection of James and Virgina Moffett.

Charles Bunnell, “Peace,” 1961, oil on canvas. Collection of James and Virgina Moffett.

Charles Bunnell, "Self Portrait," 1963, gouache on paper. Collection of James and Virginia Moffett.

Charles Bunnell, “Self Portrait,” 1963, gouache on paper. Collection of James and Virginia Moffett.

 

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