Residents of Mountain Shadows and others are invited to an informational meeting Tuesday, May 7th. The meeting is expected to address updated information regarding the increased flood risk and the city’s planned response to a potential flash flooding. Presenters are planning to spend the first half focusing specifically on risk in the Mountain Shadows community. It takes place from 6-8 PM at Sanctuary at Front Range Alliance Church on Centennial Boulevard.

On Saturday, May 18th, Colorado Springs officials will distribute free sandbags to residents who may be affected by potential flooding. The distribution will take place from 9 AM until 1 PM at the Verizon Wireless building, with access off Flying W Ranch Road. Volunteers will be on hand to fill sandbags and help residents load them into cars.

 

One Response to Flood Meeting Scheduled for Mountain Shadows Residents; City to Distribute More Sandbags

  1. Mark Kissinger says:

    Sandbags alone are not enough. What is needed is a coordinated series of contoured swales in the burn area to slow the water, allowing it to be absorbed into the ground, where plantings in the swales can utilize the water.

    This can be accomplished using on-site materials, such as orienting felled trees along the contours. Native plantings of fast-growing “pioneer species” ground cover should be the first vegetation to get a toehold in these swales. Other, more permanent vegetation of drought-tolerant native species can be introduced later.

    The idea is to amplify natural processes with human mitigation efforts. Merely making sure that the burnt stumps of trees an brush in the area are oriented to follow the hillside’s contours will provide the niche for natural vegetation to take hold. This requires some human power, but not a lot of material expense. A swale can also be quickly cut with heavy equipment in critical areas. The combination of swales and earthen berms slows down the flow of water, allowing it to soak in while making the moisture available for reestablishing vegetation.

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