Residents of Mountain Shadows and others are invited to an informational meeting Tuesday, May 7th. The meeting is expected to address updated information regarding the increased flood risk and the city’s planned response to a potential flash flooding. Presenters are planning to spend the first half focusing specifically on risk in the Mountain Shadows community. It takes place from 6-8 PM at Sanctuary at Front Range Alliance Church on Centennial Boulevard.

On Saturday, May 18th, Colorado Springs officials will distribute free sandbags to residents who may be affected by potential flooding. The distribution will take place from 9 AM until 1 PM at the Verizon Wireless building, with access off Flying W Ranch Road. Volunteers will be on hand to fill sandbags and help residents load them into cars.

 

One Response to Flood Meeting Scheduled for Mountain Shadows Residents; City to Distribute More Sandbags

  1. Mark Kissinger says:

    Sandbags alone are not enough. What is needed is a coordinated series of contoured swales in the burn area to slow the water, allowing it to be absorbed into the ground, where plantings in the swales can utilize the water.

    This can be accomplished using on-site materials, such as orienting felled trees along the contours. Native plantings of fast-growing “pioneer species” ground cover should be the first vegetation to get a toehold in these swales. Other, more permanent vegetation of drought-tolerant native species can be introduced later.

    The idea is to amplify natural processes with human mitigation efforts. Merely making sure that the burnt stumps of trees an brush in the area are oriented to follow the hillside’s contours will provide the niche for natural vegetation to take hold. This requires some human power, but not a lot of material expense. A swale can also be quickly cut with heavy equipment in critical areas. The combination of swales and earthen berms slows down the flow of water, allowing it to soak in while making the moisture available for reestablishing vegetation.

News

AP
October 1, 2014 | NPR · Elizabeth Warren says a new recordings of conversation by Federal Reserve officials show that the same kind of cozy relationships that led to the 2008 meltdown continue.
 

AP
October 1, 2014 | NPR · Warren tells Morning Edition that audio tapes made by an investigator working for the New York Fed reenforce the perception of a disturbingly cozy relationship between regulators and banks.
 

AP
October 1, 2014 | NPR · The new book Back Channel to Cuba, reveals how U.S. presidents, from Kennedy on, have held secret talks with Havana, even though the public stance was silence toward Cuba.
 

Arts & Life

AP
October 1, 2014 | NPR · NPR’s TV critic Eric Deggans visited the set of FX’s cross-border crime drama, discovering the way the show’s Spanish-language scenes help reveal new dimensions to the series’ Mexican characters.
 

September 30, 2014 | NPR · Tess Taylor reviews Christian Wiman’s new collection of poems, “Once in the West.”
 

September 30, 2014 | NPR · Rachel Martin talks to food writer Mark Bittman about his new cookbook, “How to Cook Everything Fast,” which thumbs its nose at the French tradition of having ingredients prepped before you cook.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
October 1, 2014 | NPR · The Strokes frontman — now with a new band, The Voidz — returns with his most challenging release yet: a strange, dark album influenced by ’80s hardcore and underground world music.
 

Courtesy of the artist
September 30, 2014 | NPR · Two new albums, a solo effort and a collaboration with the band 3RDEYEGIRL, mark Prince’s return to the studio. Tom Moon says that only one fully captures what an explosive performer he can still be.
 

AFP/Getty Images
September 30, 2014 | NPR · The label has become a crucial ambassador, introducing many world-music artists to American fans. Hear 10 songs from across Nonesuch’s remarkable 50-year history.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab