Industrial hemp could be Colorado’s next cash crop. But until rules are crafted for the growing and processing of the plant, state officials are telling would-be hemp farmers to wait. KUNC’s Luke Runyon has more.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The state’s first hemp crop went into the ground last week in the southeastern town of Springfield, just a few days after state lawmakers passed rules for the sale and taxation of recreational marijuana. What’s not finished is a regulatory framework for industrial hemp. The plant is mostly used for its fiber, in products like clothing and lotions.

Ron Carleton is with the Colorado Department of Agriculture. He says his office phone has been ringing off the hook, with farmers wanting to know how soon they can put hemp in the ground.

“A lot of folks believe that industrial hemp has considerable promise and so they’re interested in when they can start.”

Carleton cautions farmers against jumping into the hemp game too quickly. It’s still illegal at the federal level. That kept Yuma County farmer Michael Bowman from planting hemp this spring.

“The risk of getting caught in this federal web is small, but it’s not nonexistent.”

State officials have until March of next year to come up with rules for governing hemp growers.

 

Comments are closed.

News

January 18, 2018 | NPR · Google’s popular art selfie feature isn’t available in Illinois or Texas. NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly talks with Matthew Kluger, a professor at George Mason University, about how biometric privacy laws are affecting tech companies in certain states.
 

January 18, 2018 | NPR · The is not the first time Congress has had little time left to find a deal to prevent a government shutdown. But what lessons were learned from previous government shutdown showdowns? Who has the power, who gets the blame, and what does the history of these confrontations tell us about this current situation?
 

January 18, 2018 | NPR · Donald Trump’s inauguration speech may be remembered for his description of “American carnage.” But one year later, we look at how good of a roadmap it was for his first year as president.
 

Arts & Life

January 18, 2018 | NPR · Google’s popular art selfie feature isn’t available in Illinois or Texas. NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly talks with Matthew Kluger, a professor at George Mason University, about how biometric privacy laws are affecting tech companies in certain states.
 

Hachette Book Group
January 18, 2018 | FA · Christian Picciolini spent eight years as a member of a violent, white power skinhead group. He eventually withdrew and co-founded a nonprofit to help extremists disengage.
 

Restless Books
January 18, 2018 | NPR · Ana Simo’s brash and unsettling debut novel straddles the line between pulp noir and slapstick; it’s the story of a struggling writer who decides that murder is the cure for her decade-long block.
 

Music

Mountain Stage
January 18, 2018 | NPR · The Nashville-based country singer-songwriter charms with a set full of sharp-witted songs from her latest release, Live from Los Angeles.
 

Courtesy of the artist
January 18, 2018 | WXPN-FM · Bringing together her Afrikaans, Portuguese and Welsh heritage, all combined into the unique perspective of someone who moved to South Africa as a child.
 

Courtesy of the artist
January 18, 2018 | NPR · A live psychedelic performance recorded live in the economic hub of the country, Johannesburg.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab