Colorado Springs City Council yesterday voted to spend $10 million from the city savings account to lessen the risk of catastrophic fire and flooding following last year’s Waldo Canyon fire. KRCC’s Liz Ruskin reports.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Some of money is intended to thin trees on city owned land. But Chief of Staff Laura Neumann says floodwater is the main focus.

“8.8 million of the $10 million is related to flood mitigation, two projects specifically: Camp Creek, and north and south Douglas Creek.”

Neumann says the money will rebuild channels to improve flow and containment. It’s part of $46 million the city plans to spend this year on stormwater projects.

In other action, the Council gave initial approval to spend $300,000 to replace old police motorcycles with new Harleys, and to spend $2.2 million on personnel, primarily to improve salaries for police and firefighters.


One Response to Colorado Springs Council Approves $10 Million for Mitigation Work

  1. Mark Kissinger says:

    I hope the city returns the 31st street drainage to more what it used to look like: more vegetation, less concrete containment = more absorption of water into the soil. Also, use permaculture design on the burn scar: need contoured swales & native plantings to slow down the water to let it soak in. Can be done with on-site materials. The able homeless should work on the flood mitigation as their contribution for city services.

    We need to use the water that falls on our roofs, streets, and parking lots. Using the streets to channelize the water is a bad idea: the water should be directed to areas of vegetation, such as parks and planting strips. The additional vegetation will help to cool the city’s “heat island” effect.

    All parking lots should have more trees for shade, and solar collectors to power plug-in cars. We have so much sunshine, the city could be a leader in using solar power. The waste heat and moisture from Martin Drake should be channeled into city greenhouses, which would provide year-around food & employment for the homeless, and bring them into a better relationship with the city as productive citizens.


Getty Images
November 25, 2015 | NPR · Nobody wants a side of politics on his or her thanksgiving table, but it’s probably going to happen. Here’s some advice to get you through — you may need to buy a duck quacker, though.

AFP/Getty Images
November 25, 2015 | NPR · The president gave a statement urging Americans to travel and gather this Thanksgiving holiday weekend without fear.

Getty Images
November 25, 2015 | NPR · The trials in the southeastern state of New South Wales are part of a $11.6 million program to protect beachgoers. Drones send real-time images of coastal waters to an operator using GPS coordinates.

Arts & Life

Courtesy of Design Studio Press
November 25, 2015 | NPR · Illustrator Simon Stålenhag has put together a compilation of short stories to accompany his haunting, gorgeous paintings of an alternate Sweden full of aliens and strange technology. And dinosaurs.

Taji Marie for NPR
November 25, 2015 | NPR · Cranberry sauce is a Thanksgiving tradition. But if you’re ready for a fresh take on this staple, why not try cranberries in chutney or cake? America’s Test Kitchen founder Chris Kimball offers ideas.

November 24, 2015 | NPR · What would a small dinosaur look like in Class V rapids? That’s the question Pixar filmmakers had to answer for their film The Good Dinosaur. So they piled into a raft to figure it out for themselves.


Courtesy of the artist
November 25, 2015 | WXPN · The Australian folk-rock band is making strides in the U.S. with its new album, Limit of Love.

Courtesy of the artist
November 25, 2015 | NPR · Hear how artists from both sides of the Atlantic commemorate their homes through music.

Courtesy of the artist
November 25, 2015 | NPR · One of Nashville’s secret piano-playing treasures discusses his new musical biography of the great Jimmie Rodgers, and the changes taking place in Music City.

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac