Colorado Springs City Council yesterday voted to spend $10 million from the city savings account to lessen the risk of catastrophic fire and flooding following last year’s Waldo Canyon fire. KRCC’s Liz Ruskin reports.

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Some of money is intended to thin trees on city owned land. But Chief of Staff Laura Neumann says floodwater is the main focus.

“8.8 million of the $10 million is related to flood mitigation, two projects specifically: Camp Creek, and north and south Douglas Creek.”

Neumann says the money will rebuild channels to improve flow and containment. It’s part of $46 million the city plans to spend this year on stormwater projects.

In other action, the Council gave initial approval to spend $300,000 to replace old police motorcycles with new Harleys, and to spend $2.2 million on personnel, primarily to improve salaries for police and firefighters.

 

One Response to Colorado Springs Council Approves $10 Million for Mitigation Work

  1. Mark Kissinger says:

    I hope the city returns the 31st street drainage to more what it used to look like: more vegetation, less concrete containment = more absorption of water into the soil. Also, use permaculture design on the burn scar: need contoured swales & native plantings to slow down the water to let it soak in. Can be done with on-site materials. The able homeless should work on the flood mitigation as their contribution for city services.

    We need to use the water that falls on our roofs, streets, and parking lots. Using the streets to channelize the water is a bad idea: the water should be directed to areas of vegetation, such as parks and planting strips. The additional vegetation will help to cool the city’s “heat island” effect.

    All parking lots should have more trees for shade, and solar collectors to power plug-in cars. We have so much sunshine, the city could be a leader in using solar power. The waste heat and moisture from Martin Drake should be channeled into city greenhouses, which would provide year-around food & employment for the homeless, and bring them into a better relationship with the city as productive citizens.

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