Colorado Springs City Council yesterday voted to spend $10 million from the city savings account to lessen the risk of catastrophic fire and flooding following last year’s Waldo Canyon fire. KRCC’s Liz Ruskin reports.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Some of money is intended to thin trees on city owned land. But Chief of Staff Laura Neumann says floodwater is the main focus.

“8.8 million of the $10 million is related to flood mitigation, two projects specifically: Camp Creek, and north and south Douglas Creek.”

Neumann says the money will rebuild channels to improve flow and containment. It’s part of $46 million the city plans to spend this year on stormwater projects.

In other action, the Council gave initial approval to spend $300,000 to replace old police motorcycles with new Harleys, and to spend $2.2 million on personnel, primarily to improve salaries for police and firefighters.

 

One Response to Colorado Springs Council Approves $10 Million for Mitigation Work

  1. Mark Kissinger says:

    I hope the city returns the 31st street drainage to more what it used to look like: more vegetation, less concrete containment = more absorption of water into the soil. Also, use permaculture design on the burn scar: need contoured swales & native plantings to slow down the water to let it soak in. Can be done with on-site materials. The able homeless should work on the flood mitigation as their contribution for city services.

    We need to use the water that falls on our roofs, streets, and parking lots. Using the streets to channelize the water is a bad idea: the water should be directed to areas of vegetation, such as parks and planting strips. The additional vegetation will help to cool the city’s “heat island” effect.

    All parking lots should have more trees for shade, and solar collectors to power plug-in cars. We have so much sunshine, the city could be a leader in using solar power. The waste heat and moisture from Martin Drake should be channeled into city greenhouses, which would provide year-around food & employment for the homeless, and bring them into a better relationship with the city as productive citizens.

News

AP
March 24, 2017 | NPR · President Trump co-wrote the book on making a deal in 1987. But the former businessman couldn’t deliver on overhauling health care.
 

AP
March 24, 2017 | NPR · A Pennsylvania jury convicted Graham Spanier on Friday of one of three counts against him for his handling of sexual abuse allegations against disgraced assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.
 

Getty Images
March 24, 2017 | NPR · The directions, in four memorandums sent last week, require social media checks on certain applicants and instruct consular officials to identify “populations warranting increased scrutiny.”
 

Arts & Life

Getty Images
March 25, 2017 | NPR · “If there’s a locker room that doesn’t have it, I haven’t seen it,” says ESPN reporter Baxter Holmes, who expands on his recent story, which details professional basketball’s obsession with the snack.
 

March 24, 2017 | FA · Daniel Clowes’ angst-ridden graphic novel is the basis for a new film starring Woody Harrelson and Laura Dern. Critic David Edelstein says Wilson‘s abrasive protagonist is worth getting to know.
 

March 24, 2017 | FA · In the early 20th century, American eugenicists used forced sterilization to “breed out” traits considered undesirable. Adam Cohen tells the story in Imbeciles. Originally broadcast March 7, 2016.
 

Music

March 24, 2017 | NPR · NPR’s Audie Cornish speaks with NPR Music editors Jacob Ganz and Andrew Flanagan about the latest in music news — a new album by the late Chuck Berry, the streaming service SoundCloud survives bankruptcy, the curious case of a hoaxster and the latest from Kendrick Lamar.
 

WXPN
March 24, 2017 | WXPN · The eclectic Brooklyn singer’s new album, Regina, takes inspiration from Queens of all kinds — historical, mythological and the one led by Freddie Mercury.
 

Courtesy of the artist
March 24, 2017 | NPR · In a clever twist on the “lyric video” trend, the words to Future Islands’ new song are signed by ASL interpreter Jonathan Lamberton.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab