A strange green rock discovered in Morocco last year was hailed by the press as the first meteorite from Mercury. But scientists who’ve been puzzling over the stone since then say the accumulating evidence may point in a different direction. Maybe, just maybe, they say, the 4.56-billion-year-old rock fell to Earth from the asteroid belt located between Mars and Jupiter.

If that’s true, the rock is “still extremely interesting,” says Tim McCoy, who curates the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History’s collection of 35,000 meteorites. “[It] tells us something about the birth of the solar system, but not the birth of the innermost planet.”

The olive green meteorite, flecked with bits of white and brown, first came to scientists’ attention last year when a German collector, Stefan Ralew, saw the unusual stone in Morocco and shipped it off for analysis to Tony Irving, a geochemist and meteorite specialist affiliated with the University of Washington in Seattle. Irving routinely receives such packages from all over the world.

“From experience, I knew it was very unlikely to be an Earth rock,” Irving says. “It wasn’t from Mars, and if it was a meteorite, it was highly unusual.” As it turns out, the rock was even weirder than it looked.

“The minerals were very low in iron,” he says, “and most meteorites have more iron in their minerals than this.” Irving’s mind turned to the planet Mercury. New data had been coming in from NASA’s Messenger spacecraft, which is orbiting Mercury. It revealed that Mercury’s surface lacked iron.

“I think it was the Messenger data that I had recently studied and just sort of compared it, on a whim almost,” Irving says. “[I was] quite amazed to find that some of the chemical features were a pretty close match.”

He started to get excited. Every now and then, something big strikes a planet and knocks off a few chunks. Experts predict that some chunks of Mercury may have already made the 57-million-mile trip to Earth, but none have been found. This could be a piece. But Irving needed more evidence, so he packed up samples and sent them to colleagues around the country for further analysis.

One of the most exciting findings came from a colleague who had measured the magnetic field of one of the pieces. It was smaller than almost anything yet seen in the solar system.

“And it’s very close to the present magnetic field of Mercury,” Irving says. “Putting it all together, I could see that there was a possibility of proposing this Mercury idea.”

And that’s just what he did. This March, Irving presented his theory at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in Texas. But scientists at the meeting were more skeptical. In the audience was Shoshana Weider, a fellow at the Carnegie Institution of Washington, who works on the Messenger mission. Her first thought, when she heard that the rock might be from Mercury, was, “That would be nice.” But she’s not convinced.

“There was nothing that jumped out and said, ‘No, this can’t be from Mercury,’ ” she says, “but there were a few bits that didn’t quite match with Mercury.” For example, the rock lacks sulfur, while Mercury’s surface is covered in it.

She’s not the only one with doubts about the green rock. The Smithsonian’s Tim McCoy has a problem with the rock’s age.

“The meteorite is very, very old — 4.56 billion years old,” he says. “So it’s essentially formed at the same time as the birth of the planet, whereas Mercury is a huge, hot planet that probably wouldn’t have cooled off enough to have solid rock 4.56 billion years ago.”

McCoy has his own ideas about the meteorite’s origins. He has another shiny metallic rock in his collection that, under the microscope, contains some crystals the same color as the Morocco specimen

That crystal is chromian diopside. It’s the same mineral that gives Irving’s meteorite its distinctive green color. And just like Irving’s rock, this one is 4.56 billion years old. But it’s not from Mercury; it’s known to be from that asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. McCoy says that maybe the new green meteorite came from the asteroid belt, too.

Irving says he won’t be too upset if it turns out the meteorite came from somewhere else. “As far as I’m personally concerned, if this rock turns out to be not from there and we can find an alternative,” he says, “that’s just fine with me.”

In the meantime, admirers of the little green rock will soon be able to own a piece. The German collector who sent Irving that first sample has several other fragments that he’s planning to sell.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.
 

Comments are closed.

News

August 27, 2016 | KUT · At the University of Texas, it’s the first week of school under a new state law that allows concealed handguns in classes, buildings and dorms. Protesters demonstrated for and against the law.
 

August 27, 2016 | NPR · Parenting blogger Doyin Richards, mother Tammy Garnes, and professor Christopher Emdin share goals for the new school year and thoughts about homework.
 

August 27, 2016 | NPR · Lawmakers are demanding answers after the maker of an allergy treatment raised the price from about $100 per pack to about $600 per pack in seven years. Parents say they can’t afford it.
 

Arts & Life

August 27, 2016 | NPR · Nina McLemore designs clothes for powerful women: Hillary Clinton, Elizabeth Warren, Janet Yellen, Elena Kagan and others. She talks about how fashion can help women stand out in political office.
 

Mark Seliger
August 27, 2016 | NPR · In Tom Wolfe’s first book of nonfiction in 16 years, he argues that the development of speech, not evolution, has made humans what we are today — evolution, he says, applies only to animals.
 

Shigeo Anzai Courtesy of Benesse Art Site Naoshima
August 27, 2016 | NPR · The population of Naoshima has fallen to 3,000. But this year, its art will attract 800,000 tourists from around the world. “The level of our sophistication has gone up considerably,” says a resident.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
August 27, 2016 | NPR · Sir the Baptist grew up on the South Side of Chicago. NPR’s Scott Simon talks with the singer and rapper about how music became his way of picking up where his father left off.
 

Susan Sharon
August 27, 2016 | MPBN · The religious sect known as Shakers, responsible for the song “Simple Gifts” and thousands of others, is almost gone — and a non-Shaker is trying to keep the group’s musical history alive.
 

Sony Pictures Classics
August 26, 2016 | WBGO+JAZZ.org · Hear three interpretations of the musical icon: on screen, with actor and director Don Cheadle; on the page, with co-biographer Quincy Troupe; and on stage, with trumpeter Keyon Harrold.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab