Fourth-generation farmer Kent Peppler will have a hard time securing irrigation water this year. The ongoing drought has forced cities to hold on to their supplies, which means Peppler will have to fallow some of his fields in Mead, Colo. (Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media)

Fourth-generation farmer Kent Peppler will have a hard time securing irrigation water this year. The ongoing drought has forced cities to hold on to their supplies, which means Peppler will have to fallow some of his fields in Mead, Colo. (Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media)

Farmers throughout the Great Plains are preparing for what could be a tough growing season. They’re scrambling to find irrigation water, made scarce by the region’s persistent drought. In eastern Colorado, thirsty cities have gobbled up water rights for decades, selling what they don’t need back to farmers. As KUNC and Harvest Public Media’s Luke Runyon reports, the agreement only works when water is plentiful.

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2 Responses to Drought Years Challenge Water Agreements between Cities and Ag Land

  1. Nicole Rosa says:

    Yet we seem to have an unlimited supply of water for the oil companies to use for fracking. Go figure.

  2. Cyndy Kulp says:

    Yes, Nicole, good point…. no mention of gas and oil operations in this piece and all the water they require for fracking, water that is then poisoned and needs to be disposed of forever. If cities are gobbling up water before farmers can get it, then perhaps we should look at what they are then re-selling to frackers. I understand that in Greely, the trucks pull up to the city hydrants every day to fill up! Surely this is causing local farmers to suffer even more.

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