Mike Clark by Kevin Ihle

Mike Clark by Kevin Ihle

We’re continually blown away by the fruits of the house music scene here in the Pikes Peak region. We’ve long contended that much of what defines and defies our local culture is ability to remain, or at least to appear, secret or hidden. Given our spotty track record for supporting arts and culture that isn’t non-profit and doesn’t have massive institutional support behind it, it’s no surprise that our finest produce would be locally grown. One of the mainstays of the local house and festival scene is musician Mike Clark. A member of the oft-lauded Haunted Windchimes and a solo force in his own right, Clark just released Round and Round, his second solo record under the name Mike Clark and the Sugar Sounds. Then another mainstay of the local house music scene, blogger Heather Browne, managed to capture Clark and Co. in Shove Chapel revealing something… Well, as Roald Dahl wrote in The Minpins: “And above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it.”

As Heather Browne writes over at FuelFriendsBlog.com:

The songs on Round and Round, his debut record with The Sugar Sounds, make you sway and tap like old rock & roll 45s. This chapel session feels more focused on Mike’s tremendous emergent voice — it’s one you have to stop what you are doing to give it the attention it deserves.

Click HERE to watch and listen to Mike Clark and The Sugar Sounds at Heather Browne’s Chapel Sessions.

 

2 Responses to The Sugar Sounds of Our Town

  1. Johanna says:

    Love, love, love Mike Clark!

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