A measure to require more inspectors for oil and gas wells across the state is scheduled for a public hearing at the capitol tomorrow. It was the first drilling related bill introduced this session, and the sponsor hopes it will begin to address public concerns about hydraulic fracturing. Bente Birkeland has more from the state capitol.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

5 Responses to First Democratic Oil and Gas Bill to Get Hearing at Capitol

  1. Nicole Rosa says:

    Really?! So 15 inspectors for 43,000 wells isn’t enough?!

  2. Cyndy Kulp says:

    Don’t forget the inactive wells, they leak, too and there are more of them than inactive.

  3. Georgia Moen says:

    My head is going to explode! Our congressional representatives are just now starting to think it’s a good idea to have wells inspected more frequently? A large portion of the public has been screaming their concerns for a LONG time now. What planet are they living on, for crying out loud!

  4. laura h says:

    So annoying. All states’ inspections are tragically underfunded and overwhelmed by the number of wells, active or otherwise.

News

Courtesy of University of Pittsburgh
March 1, 2015 | WESA · The groundbreaking ambulance service was created in the 1960s as the city struggled with racial tensions and poor medical transport. It trained African-American men to provide crucial emergency care.
 

Courtesy Julissa Arce
March 1, 2015 | NPR · Julissa Arce was a stellar student and an even better financial analyst, but she was scared to go to work every day. “Maybe today’s the day someone’s going to find out,” she feared.
 

Courtesy of Alex Tran
March 1, 2015 | NPR · He’s an epidemiologist. She’s a nurse. And both of them felt compelled to head off to West Africa to battle the virus.
 

Arts & Life

Paramount Pictures
March 1, 2015 | NPR · The man behind the look of Selma and A Most Violent Year talks about depicting violence, participating in history and being a black cinematographer in Hollywood.
 

AFP/Getty Images
March 1, 2015 | NPR · In his novel She Will Build Him a City, Raj Kamal Jha weaves the reality he sees as a journalist in New Delhi — where many gravitate looking for a better future — into a fictional, magical world.
 

Wikipedia
March 1, 2015 | NPR · One of rock music’s most loved, feared and prolific scribes, the 72-year-old Christgau says he knew early on that he liked criticism better than journalism: “I didn’t want to get into people’s faces.”
 

Music

Courtesy of Tricia Williams
March 1, 2015 | NPR · Diane Downs teaches music to the Louisville Leopard Percussionists in Kentucky. She says she hopes the kids feel like rock stars now that a video of their Led Zeppelin medley went viral on YouTube.
 

Wikipedia
March 1, 2015 | NPR · One of rock music’s most loved, feared and prolific scribes, the 72-year-old Christgau says he knew early on that he liked criticism better than journalism: “I didn’t want to get into people’s faces.”
 

Courtesy of the artist
March 1, 2015 | NPR · This month’s selections include a youngster from Montreal, a veteran from Chicago, warehouse techno from Paris, a visionary from London, and footwork from Michael Jackson’s hometown of Gary, Indiana.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab