A government study of the medical records of 1,000 kids found no correlation between the number of vaccines a child received and his or her risk of autism spectrum disorder. Experts hope the finding will allay some parents who worry that many vaccines on one day or in the first two years of life may lead to autism.

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The renowned chef may be famous for his Michelin-star-winning restaurants, but he also runs a string of gourmet bakeries. He shares some favorite confections for Easter, with recipes for hot cross buns, marshmallow eggs and carrot muffins.

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Dawn Maestas helps women who have been branded with tattoos as a result of domestic violence.

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Researchers are using cellular machinery to turn E. coli bacteria into little computers. By creating on/off switches that are similar to electrictronic transistors, scientists can control each microbe’s behavior.

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Hi there. I’m Russell! I’m a 8-year-old neutered Australian Shepherd. I am just an all-around great dog! Or so they tell me. I know some basic commands and I follow them well. I’m also a whiz at catching that ball! At least during my time at HSPPR, I’ve done wonderfully with [...]

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The Middle Distance 3.29.13: Anthems of the Resurrection

Last Sunday, Christian churches around the world remembered Jesus’ final entry into Jerusalem on a donkey. Revelers along the road spread palm fronds and, according to the New Testament, many laid their coats on the road to make a path for this unlikely king who [...]

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Bills on oil and gas and fracking are expected to dominate the latter part of the state’s legislative session. A measure to change the makeup of the agency that regulates the energy industry drew a large crowd at the capitol today. As Bente Birkeland reports, it cleared its first committee.

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Smoked salmon pastrami may sound heretical, but owners of a revisionist Jewish deli in Washington, D.C., say it’s all part of a revival of traditional Jewish cuisine.

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The only requirement for Colorado lawmakers during the annual legislative session is passing a budget. And unlike previous years there won’t be cuts for programs like K through 12 schools, state contractors and public employees. But as Bente Birkeland reports, debate in the senate yesterday was still extensive.

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How do oysters attach themselves to rocks? They need a glue, but a glue that can set in a watery environment. In this installment of “Joe’s Big Idea,” NPR’s Joe Palca reports that glue could lead to medical advances.

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The court’s final day of arguments involving same-sex marriage laws served up some memorable observations. Here are five key questions that came up as the justices debated the constitutionality of the federal Defense of Marriage Act.

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Overlooked by the industry, Bay Area rappers as different as E-40, Too Short and The Coup were free to make and sell music that didn’t sound like anybody else’s.

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The IMF says that price of gasoline in the U.S. covers the cost of producing and distribution gasoline but it doesn’t reflect the costs that gasoline consumption imposes on society — in the form of traffic, congestion, pollution and global warming. Linda Wertheimer talks to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, about a new IMF report on energy subsidies.

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Like some other big cities around the world, New Delhi has train cars reserved for women only. The female riders say it offers them a secure way to commute, but they argue that the larger problem is male attitudes.

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The persistence of grain bin entrapments and a horrific 2010 incident expose weaknesses in worker safety laws and enforcement. An NPR and Center for Public Integrity analysis has found that among 179 deaths since 1984, fines were reduced 60 percent of the time.

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It’s hard to imagine that a person who makes books would be glad that the author and book are dead. But such is the “strang” world of Aaron Cohick, The Printer of The Press at Colorado College and the proprietor of the New Lights Press. (The title of the show, as it were, comes [...]

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HSPPR Pet of the Day: Lydia

On March 28, 2013 By

Hi. I’m Lydia, a 2-year-old beautiful jet-black spayed shorthair. This tiny princess loves to be loved! I enjoy kitty hugs and head scratches, and I might just rub against your ankles a bit as well. And you will love my stunning golden eyes! I’m a Secret Admirer in HSPPR’s Feline-ality program, [...]

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Building huge turbine farms too close together might significantly reduce their power, some atmospheric scientists say. The problem is “wind shadow” — the turbulence created by one big cluster of turbines that steals wind from another cluster down the road.

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Current drought conditions in southeastern Colorado are not likely to improve without significant, consistent precipitation. KRCC’s Eliza Densmore reports.

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A bill to repeal Colorado’s death penalty died in a committee hearing over concerns that Governor John Hickenlooper would veto the bill. Last week the Governor told Democratic lawmakers he had serious reservations about the measure. Bente Birkeland has more from the state capitol.

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The Supreme Court hears arguments Wednesday on the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act, which denies federal recognition and benefits for same-sex couples. The case involves a woman charged a hefty estate tax when her spouse died, which she would not have owed if her spouse had been a man.

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Creators of a solar-powered aircraft hope to fly it day and night across the U.S. with no fuel, and eventually around the world. It’s a quixotic — some might call it nutty — undertaking. But the creators hope the flight helps challenge assumptions about what solar technology can do.

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Nearly 500 farmers and workers have suffocated in grain storage bins in the past 40 years. The worst year on record was 2010, with 26 people dying. Hefty fines and criminal charges are possible for negligent employers. But NPR and The Center for Public Integrity found that enforcement is weak, even as workers continue to die.

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