In October of 2011, Zak Podmore and Will Stauffer-Norris embarked upon an adventure of Twainian proportions. Armed with kayaks, inflatable rafts, camping gear, and freshly minted CC diplomas, they departed from the snowy headwaters of the Green River and paddled their way south, down the entire length of the Colorado River basin. Over the course of their 1700 mile journey, which was supported by Colorado College’s State of The Rockies project, they took pictures, penned a series of Huffington Post articles, kept an online travelogue, and generally worked to raise awareness about the (un)health of Colorado River. And then, last summer, they did it again. However, this time the distance was shorter (800 miles), their team was bigger–CC grads David Spiegel and Carson McMurray joined the crew–and the trip was designed with a finished product in mind: a five part video series highlighting the myriad ways in which the Colorado River breathes life into the American Southwest.

Though the series likely won’t be released until this summer, the trailer just premiered on the group’s website. In anticipation of that release, Zak Podmore came into the studio to share some pictures and talk about the project. See the slideshow above.

Here’s the trailer for the upcoming series:

 

3 Responses to Hometown Huck Finn and the River that Giveth Life

  1. B Casados says:

    Thanks for this.–I appreciate both the commentary and the photography. Please be sure to let us know about it when the videos are released.

  2. Mary Ellen Davis says:

    Excellent! Like a micro lecture.

  3. Lynda Stauffer says:

    Will, Zak, and crew,
    The trailer is well done. I’m looking forward to viewing the series. Interviews with people whose lives depend on the river, or who think the river has dried completely will provide insight into the need for advocacy and action to protect and heal the river. In contrast, the views of your athletic and spiritual journey will call like those who take joy in being in the river to action. What are the opportunities for this series to be on Colorado’s Public Television, and then, distributed to other PBS stations? The series used in environmental classes, even in civil engineering classes? I think nature/conservation groups throughout the country would benefit from your series. Here, in SC, we have many groups/organizations who work diligently to buy pristine lands, saving them from development. I am so proud of your work, Will. Congratulations, and keep going!!!

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