In October of 2011, Zak Podmore and Will Stauffer-Norris embarked upon an adventure of Twainian proportions. Armed with kayaks, inflatable rafts, camping gear, and freshly minted CC diplomas, they departed from the snowy headwaters of the Green River and paddled their way south, down the entire length of the Colorado River basin. Over the course of their 1700 mile journey, which was supported by Colorado College’s State of The Rockies project, they took pictures, penned a series of Huffington Post articles, kept an online travelogue, and generally worked to raise awareness about the (un)health of Colorado River. And then, last summer, they did it again. However, this time the distance was shorter (800 miles), their team was bigger–CC grads David Spiegel and Carson McMurray joined the crew–and the trip was designed with a finished product in mind: a five part video series highlighting the myriad ways in which the Colorado River breathes life into the American Southwest.

Though the series likely won’t be released until this summer, the trailer just premiered on the group’s website. In anticipation of that release, Zak Podmore came into the studio to share some pictures and talk about the project. See the slideshow above.

Here’s the trailer for the upcoming series:

 

3 Responses to Hometown Huck Finn and the River that Giveth Life

  1. B Casados says:

    Thanks for this.–I appreciate both the commentary and the photography. Please be sure to let us know about it when the videos are released.

  2. Mary Ellen Davis says:

    Excellent! Like a micro lecture.

  3. Lynda Stauffer says:

    Will, Zak, and crew,
    The trailer is well done. I’m looking forward to viewing the series. Interviews with people whose lives depend on the river, or who think the river has dried completely will provide insight into the need for advocacy and action to protect and heal the river. In contrast, the views of your athletic and spiritual journey will call like those who take joy in being in the river to action. What are the opportunities for this series to be on Colorado’s Public Television, and then, distributed to other PBS stations? The series used in environmental classes, even in civil engineering classes? I think nature/conservation groups throughout the country would benefit from your series. Here, in SC, we have many groups/organizations who work diligently to buy pristine lands, saving them from development. I am so proud of your work, Will. Congratulations, and keep going!!!

News

AP
November 1, 2014 | NPR · Dante Martin faces a possible 22 years in prison for manslaughter in the death of fellow Florida A&M band member Robert Champion.
 

AP
November 1, 2014 | NPR · The Nigerian extremist group says more than 200 girls it kidnapped from a school in April have been married to fighters. The group also denies stories that it has reached a cease fire deal.
 

November 1, 2014 | NPR · When Daylight Saving Time arrives, who adjusts all those old clocks? Noel Poirier, director of the National Watch and Clock Museum, tells NPR’s Scott Simon he has to turn back 60 pendulum clocks.
 

Arts & Life

Getty Images
November 1, 2014 | NPR · Cornel West’s new book laments the decline of what he calls “prophetic fire” among black leaders, and lifts up six examples of people who were willing to risk their lives in the service of the truth.
 

November 1, 2014 | NPR · Jan Morris’s new book is an ode to Renaissance painter Vittore Carpaccio. Yes, the thinly sliced meat is named after him. NPR’s Scott Simon talks to Morris about her life, work and favorite painter.
 

NPR
November 1, 2014 | NPR · NPR’s politics team is hosting an election night party Tuesday. But you can’t have a party without good grub. So we’ve put together a menu inspired by the politics in play.
 

Music

iStockphoto.com
November 1, 2014 | NPR · A dad can’t wait to share songs with his newborn son. But are there right and wrong ways to do so?
 

November 1, 2014 | NPR · Sylvie Simmons has had a long and distinguished career as a music journalist, but she always had a secret desire to perform. She shares her first album, Sylvie, with NPR’s Scott Simon.
 

Courtesy of the artist
November 1, 2014 | NPR · The story is well-known: The former known Cat Stevens became Muslim, changed his name and gave up performing for years. The hiatus gave him a chance to “walk the talk,” he tells NPR’s Scott Simon.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab