We’ve gotten a lot of good submissions for the 36 Views of Pikes Peak Project so far and thought we’d do a little critique to help point participants in the direction of what we’re looking for. As a general comment, we want to either get as far away as possible from the received images (think postcards) of Pikes Peak as possible, or challenge those images. We’re looking for great compositions that illustrate the cultural (human) life of the Pikes Peak region. More than anything we’re looking for those images that illuminate or change the way we see the mountain and our relationship to it.

None of these “critiques” is meant to judge the images and paintings submitted (though we’ve left names off for now), but to give a clearer sense of what we’re hoping to see.

You can watch the slide show of Hokusai’s 36 Views (46, actually) HERE, and you can look at our selection of 36 Historical Views of Pikes Peak and find out about our exhibition next summer again HERE

Thanks, and please keep the images coming to thebigsomething@krcc.org.

 

4 Responses to Critique: 36 Views of Pikes Peak

  1. Jeanne says:

    Noel, you seem to be asking for submissions that aren’t exclusively about Pikes Peak’s beauty as a natural phenomena. You would like submissions that foreground the contemporary realities of the Pikes Peak region with the Pikes Peak mountain functioning as something like a indexical backdrop or a reference of secondary importance, like in the Hokusai images. This probably runs counter to how most people conceptualize Pikes Peak – especially those professional and amateur artists who attempt to capitalize on the visual appeal of ‘nature’ in & around Colorado Springs, which usually involves editing the ‘city’ out of the picture. Good luck with the project!

  2. Noel Black says:

    That’s a good way of putting it, Jeanne. Thanks. One of the reasons we’re doing this project is to invite people to see the peak not just as a “reference of secondary importance,” but as part of the whole picture. Anyone familiar with Ansel Adams’ story will know what great lengths he went through to excise any human presence from his photos. I guess you could say we’re asking for the opposite.

    Thanks!

  3. laura h says:

    Great critiques. I think you are redeeming yourself with this cool project, Noel Black!

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