We’ve gotten a lot of good submissions for the 36 Views of Pikes Peak Project so far and thought we’d do a little critique to help point participants in the direction of what we’re looking for. As a general comment, we want to either get as far away as possible from the received images (think postcards) of Pikes Peak as possible, or challenge those images. We’re looking for great compositions that illustrate the cultural (human) life of the Pikes Peak region. More than anything we’re looking for those images that illuminate or change the way we see the mountain and our relationship to it.

None of these “critiques” is meant to judge the images and paintings submitted (though we’ve left names off for now), but to give a clearer sense of what we’re hoping to see.

You can watch the slide show of Hokusai’s 36 Views (46, actually) HERE, and you can look at our selection of 36 Historical Views of Pikes Peak and find out about our exhibition next summer again HERE

Thanks, and please keep the images coming to thebigsomething@krcc.org.

 

4 Responses to Critique: 36 Views of Pikes Peak

  1. Jeanne says:

    Noel, you seem to be asking for submissions that aren’t exclusively about Pikes Peak’s beauty as a natural phenomena. You would like submissions that foreground the contemporary realities of the Pikes Peak region with the Pikes Peak mountain functioning as something like a indexical backdrop or a reference of secondary importance, like in the Hokusai images. This probably runs counter to how most people conceptualize Pikes Peak – especially those professional and amateur artists who attempt to capitalize on the visual appeal of ‘nature’ in & around Colorado Springs, which usually involves editing the ‘city’ out of the picture. Good luck with the project!

  2. Noel Black says:

    That’s a good way of putting it, Jeanne. Thanks. One of the reasons we’re doing this project is to invite people to see the peak not just as a “reference of secondary importance,” but as part of the whole picture. Anyone familiar with Ansel Adams’ story will know what great lengths he went through to excise any human presence from his photos. I guess you could say we’re asking for the opposite.

    Thanks!

  3. laura h says:

    Great critiques. I think you are redeeming yourself with this cool project, Noel Black!

News

Reuters /Landov
October 25, 2014 | NPR · Google’s Alan Eustace fell from an altitude of more than 135,000 feet, plummeting for some 15 minutes. The jump broke the record of 127,852 feet that Felix Baumgartner set in 2012.
 

Peru's Ministry of Culture
October 25, 2014 | NPR · The find was announced by Peru’s Ministry of Culture, which says the 13-angled stone was part of a water system that irrigated a strategically important area southeast of Lima.
 

Getty Images
October 25, 2014 | NPR · Students of Marysville-Pilchuck High School describe a desperate scene — and in at least one case, a teacher is being credited with helping to prevent more killing.
 

Arts & Life

AP
October 25, 2014 | NPR · For decades, Florence Henderson, who presided over the Brady Bunch, was America’s perfect Mom. We’ll ask Henderson three questions about the Ig Nobels — awarded for real, if ridiculous, research.
 

Doubleday
October 25, 2014 | NPR · Chuck Palahniuk aims for piquant social satire in his new novel, but reviewer (and longtime fan) Jason Sheehan finds his fandom severely dented by lazy characterizations and lack of actual satire.
 

Riverhead
October 25, 2014 | NPR · Farah’s latest is called Hiding in Plain Sight. It’s the story of Bella, a Somali photographer living in Rome who gets drawn into the lives of her niece and nephew after her half-brother is killed.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
October 25, 2014 | NPR · Christmas yields dozens of holiday albums each year. But, “Monster Mash” aside, what of Halloween?
 

NPR Starff
October 25, 2014 | NPR · The Danish String Quartet doesn’t live on Brahms and Beethoven alone. Watch the versatile group play Danish folk tunes, from centuries-old Fanø wedding dances to traditional Roskilde reels.
 

October 25, 2014 | NPR · The oratorio is a time-honored way for classical composers to tell a big story. Composer Ted Hearne thinks so too. His new oratorio, The Source, takes on the story of Chelsea Manning and WikiLeaks.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab