Colorado Springs City Council will proceed with oil and gas regulations, despite calls among fracking opponents for a public hearing. As KRCC’s Liz Ruskin reports, council members on both sides of the issue feel time is running out.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Council members have been working on how to regulate oil and gas development for more than a year. But city elections are around the corner and a new group will be sworn in come April. Council President Scott Hente says all their work will be lost if they don’t vote on an ordinance in the next six weeks.

“I think regardless if you hate the idea of oil wells in Colorado Springs or you love the idea of oil wells in Colorado Springs, I think one way or another we owe everybody an answer on this one.”

Councilwomen Brandy Williams and Jan Martin agreed with critics in calling for a formal public hearing, although Martin acknowledged time is short. The council is due to take a final vote on the regulations next month.

 

2 Responses to Colorado Springs Council Plans March Vote on Oil & Gas Regulations

  1. Nicole Rosa says:

    It was shocking to hear Ms. Dougan state “60 years of fracking and nothing has ever gone wrong.” Equally shocking was the fact that air quality issues were discussed for less than 3 minutes with the conclusion “we’re still working on it”. Most frightening was the mention of not knowing who owns the mineral rights under Garden of the Gods and Palmer Park.

  2. sadie grey says:

    Citizens have been calling for a public hearing for months now but council has continued to ignore us. Now they act like there isn’t time but if they had addressed our first requests a hearing would be over and done with by now. Angela ‘Drill baby Drill’ Dougan is somehow able to ignore facts and keep asserting that there has never been any problems which makes ppl like me wonder who’s pocket she’s in. This is an issue where being wrong isn’t just an ‘oops’ issue. If we get this wrong it isn’t reversible and the future generations will pay the price. Remember DDT? Asbestos? Tobacco? Love Canal? Rocky Flats? BPA? When exactly will we learn to stop listening to the soothsayers who have the wealth and own the resources?

News

SWNS.com
August 24, 2016 | NPR · The fisherman’s family says he found the pearl inside a giant clam by the island of Palawan and kept it under his bed. If confirmed, it would be far and away the largest natural pearl ever found.
 

AFP/Getty Images
August 24, 2016 | NPR · People as far away as Thailand, India, and Bangladesh felt the magnitude-6.8 quake. Historic pagodas in the city of Bagan appeared to be damaged, and at least three people reportedly died.
 

AP
August 24, 2016 | NPR · Turkey’s offensive is the largest military mission of its kind in the Syria conflict to date. It was intended to clear ISIS militants from territory along the border.
 

Arts & Life

Getty Images
August 24, 2016 | NPR · News of a 1999 rape case against Nate Parker raises some age-old questions about culture. Can art be separated from its creator? What moral obligations, if any, do the consumers of culture bear?
 

Claire Harbage
August 24, 2016 | NPR · Imbolo Mbue’s debut novel is one of the best books to deal with the financial crisis of 2007-2008. It’s the story of a Cameroonian immigrant couple and the rich, troubled Americans they work for.
 

August 23, 2016 | NPR · Lawrence Wright’s new book collects his essays for The New Yorker on the growth of terrorism in the Middle East, from the Sept. 11 attacks to the recent beheadings of journalists and aid workers.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
August 24, 2016 | NPR · The latest song from Angel Olsen, “Sister,” is both epic and reflective, a melancholy meditation on heartache and coming to terms with lost love.
 

August 24, 2016 | NPR · The band’s industrial music clangs and bangs, reflecting the nightmare of a cold world.
 

Courtesy of the artist
August 24, 2016 | NPR · The short film for “Nobody Speak,” brilliantly directed by Sam Pilling, is a powerful — if sometimes comical — statement on the dysfunction of this year’s political season.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab