If you tuned into the Grammys this weekend, then you likely saw Denver darlings, The Lumineers, performing their hit song “Ho Hey”. The group was nominated for Best New Artist and Best Americana Album, and though didn’t win in either category, the recognition clearly indicates that they’re doing something right. Colorado Springs based music blogger, Heather Browne, didn’t need the Grammy Committee to tell her that.

Way back in 2010, Browne brought the Lumineers to town to play a house show with The Head and the Heart (the video above is from that show). Then she had them back in July of 2011, to play another show and to record a set of songs in Colorado College’s Shove Chapel. The recordings were released on her blog, FUEL/FRIENDS, as part of her ongoing Chapel Sessions series (produced in collaboration with the folks at Blank Tape Records). Hear the two of the songs from that session below, and then head to Fuel/Friends to download the rest. While you’re at it, I recommend checking out the other chapel sessions on offer. Or, you can just wait to see the bands at the Grammys in a few years time…

TUS-House-Show-059-450x674

The Lumineers–“Ho Hey”

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The Lumineers–“Morning Song”

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2 Responses to Before they were Big: The Lumineers at Shove Chapel

  1. heather says:

    Hey, thanks for the feature, Jake! Conor Bourgal from Blank Tape Records, one of my partners in crime here, deduced that we think this was the first time “Ho Hey” was ever recorded. Which I think is also pretty cool :)

  2. 3is4 says:

    that WOULD be pretty cool

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