We’re kicking off the 2013 season of Western Skies with an episode on oil & gas and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

But as we gear up for this year’s new shows, we want to know: what topics do you want us to explore? What locations do you want us to visit? Who do you want us to talk to?

From the serious to the satirical, we’re asking you to send us out and about to see what your neighbors are thinking, doing, and saying.

Let us know by commenting here, or at our Facebook wall (while you’re there, like us!).

Don’t forget to tune into the 2013 inaugural show, which airs Sunday, February 3rd at 11:00.

The award-winning Western Skies is a one-hour news magazine focusing on issues facing Colorado and the west. It’s a collaboration between KRCC News and the Big Something.

 

2 Responses to Western Skies: What’s on Your Mind? You Decide

  1. Stephen says:

    For a long time I have wanted western skys to do some investigation into the air quality of our skys. More precisely I want to hear if there is any truth behind the contrails/chemtrails controversy. I’ve seen documentarys that claim jet planes overhead are at times leaving chemical cocktails of aluminum and barrium streaked across our sky for different possible nafarious reasons. In all these documentarys they simply tested mountain snow and water run off as proof, and I want to know if air/water testing has been done locally. Thank you for your show keep up the good work.

  2. Louise says:

    Some suggestions: Local farming and ranching; wildlife rehabilitation; local watershed development; what’s happening in local “urban” renewal areas; commercial and residential recycling programs; Concrete Couch projects around the area; various impacts of Ft. Carson and the defense industry locally. What’s happening locally with economic development (or lack of).
    Thanks! I like listening to Western Skies.

News

ASSOCIATED PRESS
September 17, 2014 | NPR · The Carolina Panthers placed Greg Hardy on the list over a long-running case and the Cardinals did the same after Jonathan Dwyer was arrested on suspicion of aggravated assault.
 

The Canadian Press
September 17, 2014 | NPR · The mayor, who made international news after he admitted to smoking crack, dropped out of the mayoral race last week. Ford’s doctor said he was “optimistic.”
 

AP
September 17, 2014 | NPR · The Fed said because wage-and-price hikes remain low and growth continues at a moderate pace, interest rates will stay at historic lows for a “considerable time.”
 

Arts & Life

September 17, 2014 | NPR · Martin Amis’ latest novel, which takes place in Auschwitz, has already stirred up controversy in Europe according to the New York Times. But reviewer Alan Cheuse calls it the triumph of Amis’ career.
 

Courtesy of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
September 17, 2014 | NPR · Hayes, a professor of writing at the University of Pittsburgh, was recognized for “reflecting on race, gender, and family in works that seamlessly encompass both the historical and the personal.”
 

iStockphoto
September 17, 2014 | NPR · How one woman’s quest to bring you the scientific method has resulted in a blog project chock-full of chocolate chip cookie experiments. Wear your oven mitt and bring a glass of milk.
 

Music

Folk Alley
September 17, 2014 | FolkAlley · Loretta Lynn, Jason Isbell, Jackson Browne, and more of the most revered artists in roots music performed live from Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium.
 

Vimeo
September 17, 2014 | NPR · A slow fade, rather than a hard stop, used to be the popular way to end a pop song. NPR’s Robert Siegel speaks with Slate reporter William Weir about the fade-out’s history and recent decline.
 

Mountain Stage
September 17, 2014 | NPR · The Portland singer counts indie-rock, folk and Celtic musicians among his many collaborators, but here he performs both solo and accompanied by the Mountain Stage band.
 

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