We’re kicking off the 2013 season of Western Skies with an episode on oil & gas and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

But as we gear up for this year’s new shows, we want to know: what topics do you want us to explore? What locations do you want us to visit? Who do you want us to talk to?

From the serious to the satirical, we’re asking you to send us out and about to see what your neighbors are thinking, doing, and saying.

Let us know by commenting here, or at our Facebook wall (while you’re there, like us!).

Don’t forget to tune into the 2013 inaugural show, which airs Sunday, February 3rd at 11:00.

The award-winning Western Skies is a one-hour news magazine focusing on issues facing Colorado and the west. It’s a collaboration between KRCC News and the Big Something.

 

2 Responses to Western Skies: What’s on Your Mind? You Decide

  1. Stephen says:

    For a long time I have wanted western skys to do some investigation into the air quality of our skys. More precisely I want to hear if there is any truth behind the contrails/chemtrails controversy. I’ve seen documentarys that claim jet planes overhead are at times leaving chemical cocktails of aluminum and barrium streaked across our sky for different possible nafarious reasons. In all these documentarys they simply tested mountain snow and water run off as proof, and I want to know if air/water testing has been done locally. Thank you for your show keep up the good work.

  2. Louise says:

    Some suggestions: Local farming and ranching; wildlife rehabilitation; local watershed development; what’s happening in local “urban” renewal areas; commercial and residential recycling programs; Concrete Couch projects around the area; various impacts of Ft. Carson and the defense industry locally. What’s happening locally with economic development (or lack of).
    Thanks! I like listening to Western Skies.

News

January 18, 2018 | NPR · Google’s popular art selfie feature isn’t available in Illinois or Texas. NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly talks with Matthew Kluger, a professor at George Mason University, about how biometric privacy laws are affecting tech companies in certain states.
 

January 18, 2018 | NPR · The is not the first time Congress has had little time left to find a deal to prevent a government shutdown. But what lessons were learned from previous government shutdown showdowns? Who has the power, who gets the blame, and what does the history of these confrontations tell us about this current situation?
 

January 18, 2018 | NPR · Donald Trump’s inauguration speech may be remembered for his description of “American carnage.” But one year later, we look at how good of a roadmap it was for his first year as president.
 

Arts & Life

January 18, 2018 | NPR · Google’s popular art selfie feature isn’t available in Illinois or Texas. NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly talks with Matthew Kluger, a professor at George Mason University, about how biometric privacy laws are affecting tech companies in certain states.
 

Hachette Book Group
January 18, 2018 | FA · Christian Picciolini spent eight years as a member of a violent, white power skinhead group. He eventually withdrew and co-founded a nonprofit to help extremists disengage.
 

Restless Books
January 18, 2018 | NPR · Ana Simo’s brash and unsettling debut novel straddles the line between pulp noir and slapstick; it’s the story of a struggling writer who decides that murder is the cure for her decade-long block.
 

Music

Mountain Stage
January 18, 2018 | NPR · The Nashville-based country singer-songwriter charms with a set full of sharp-witted songs from her latest release, Live from Los Angeles.
 

Courtesy of the artist
January 18, 2018 | WXPN-FM · Bringing together her Afrikaans, Portuguese and Welsh heritage, all combined into the unique perspective of someone who moved to South Africa as a child.
 

Courtesy of the artist
January 18, 2018 | NPR · A live psychedelic performance recorded live in the economic hub of the country, Johannesburg.
 

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