We’re kicking off the 2013 season of Western Skies with an episode on oil & gas and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

But as we gear up for this year’s new shows, we want to know: what topics do you want us to explore? What locations do you want us to visit? Who do you want us to talk to?

From the serious to the satirical, we’re asking you to send us out and about to see what your neighbors are thinking, doing, and saying.

Let us know by commenting here, or at our Facebook wall (while you’re there, like us!).

Don’t forget to tune into the 2013 inaugural show, which airs Sunday, February 3rd at 11:00.

The award-winning Western Skies is a one-hour news magazine focusing on issues facing Colorado and the west. It’s a collaboration between KRCC News and the Big Something.

 

2 Responses to Western Skies: What’s on Your Mind? You Decide

  1. Stephen says:

    For a long time I have wanted western skys to do some investigation into the air quality of our skys. More precisely I want to hear if there is any truth behind the contrails/chemtrails controversy. I’ve seen documentarys that claim jet planes overhead are at times leaving chemical cocktails of aluminum and barrium streaked across our sky for different possible nafarious reasons. In all these documentarys they simply tested mountain snow and water run off as proof, and I want to know if air/water testing has been done locally. Thank you for your show keep up the good work.

  2. Louise says:

    Some suggestions: Local farming and ranching; wildlife rehabilitation; local watershed development; what’s happening in local “urban” renewal areas; commercial and residential recycling programs; Concrete Couch projects around the area; various impacts of Ft. Carson and the defense industry locally. What’s happening locally with economic development (or lack of).
    Thanks! I like listening to Western Skies.

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March 29, 2017 | FA · Daniel Magariel’s debut novel explores the fierce love a 12-year-old boy has for his abusive father. Critic Maureen Corrigan calls it a “slim, deeply affecting and brutal story.”
 

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March 29, 2017 | NPR · The North Carolina home of singer, pianist and civil rights activist Nina Simone has sold. Now the new owners are trying to figure out how to honor her past.
 

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