Two Southern Colorado groups are representing the Centennial State today’s Presidential Inaugural Parade. KRCC’s Martha Perez-Sanz caught up with them last week and has more.

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Ballet Folklorico de la Raza is a Mexican folk dancing troupe based in Colorado Springs. Just before Christmas, the group got a phone call inviting them to perform in the Parade. Instructor Danae Torres says 16 advanced dancers are expected to participate.

“We’ve got all kinds of emotions running right now, but more than anything we’re just excited to be able to represent the state of Colorado. We’re excited to represent, just the people, the nation.”

The group formed in 1994 and usually performs at events like weddings and the State Fair.

Also selected to march in the Parade is Pueblo West-based Native American Women Warriors, a nation-wide group of women veterans. President and Founder Mitchelene Big Man says ten members are ready to march in traditional Native American dress, with special beading to designate specific tribes.

“Originally the jingle dress comes from the Ojibwe tribe, but the reason why we chose those dresses, that style of dress is because of what it stands for. It’s a prayer, and it’s a dance of healing.”

The nearly three-year-old group operates mainly online and over the phone. The Parade means several of the members will meet face to face for the first time.

 

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