Two Southern Colorado groups are representing the Centennial State today’s Presidential Inaugural Parade. KRCC’s Martha Perez-Sanz caught up with them last week and has more.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Ballet Folklorico de la Raza is a Mexican folk dancing troupe based in Colorado Springs. Just before Christmas, the group got a phone call inviting them to perform in the Parade. Instructor Danae Torres says 16 advanced dancers are expected to participate.

“We’ve got all kinds of emotions running right now, but more than anything we’re just excited to be able to represent the state of Colorado. We’re excited to represent, just the people, the nation.”

The group formed in 1994 and usually performs at events like weddings and the State Fair.

Also selected to march in the Parade is Pueblo West-based Native American Women Warriors, a nation-wide group of women veterans. President and Founder Mitchelene Big Man says ten members are ready to march in traditional Native American dress, with special beading to designate specific tribes.

“Originally the jingle dress comes from the Ojibwe tribe, but the reason why we chose those dresses, that style of dress is because of what it stands for. It’s a prayer, and it’s a dance of healing.”

The nearly three-year-old group operates mainly online and over the phone. The Parade means several of the members will meet face to face for the first time.

 

Comments are closed.

News

Getty Images
November 18, 2017 | NPR · Republican power brokers in D.C. are devising lots of schemes to try to edge out Roy Moore, the GOP Senate nominee in Alabama who has been accused of sexual misconduct and sexual assault.
 

Getty Images
November 18, 2017 | NPR · Asia experts say that while the president avoided major blunders on his five-nation visit, he missed more than one opportunity to offer his administration’s strategic vision for the region.
 

Courtesy of Jane Dougherty
November 18, 2017 | NPR · After the vigils and the reporters move on to the next mass shooting, the families are left to deal with the grief. “I feel like it never ends,” says Jane Dougherty, who lost her sister at Sandy Hook.
 

Arts & Life

Courtesy of Lincoln Center Theater
November 18, 2017 | NPR · Sarah DeLappe’s play The Wolves, which opens in New York on Monday, follows an elite soccer team of young women as it prepares for its own battles.
 

Getty Images
November 18, 2017 | NPR · Man Booker Prize winner John Banville has written a sequel to Henry James’ The Portrait Of A Lady. ‘It was my initial foolhardiness and overweening pride that made me do it,’ he says.
 

Courtesy of Flatiron Books
November 18, 2017 | NPR · It took until adulthood for Bonnie Morales, the daughter of immigrant Russian Jews, to appreciate the food of her childhood. Now she owns a popular Oregon restaurant and has released a new cookbook.
 

Music

November 18, 2017 | NPR · Poppy is an Internet phenom, known for her strange YouTube videos and her Japan-inspired bubblegum pop. She and her director Titanic Sinclair talk with Scott Simon about who, or what, Poppy is.
 

Courtesy of the artist
November 17, 2017 | WXPN-FM · On the occasion of his new album, Sky Trails, the legendary singer-songwriter pops in to tell funny stories from across his long career.
 

November 17, 2017 | NPR · On Wednesday, founder Kevin Lyman announced the tour is ending after 23 years. After helping launch bands like No Doubt, Sublime and countless others, next summer will be the last cross-country tour.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab