Screen Shot 2013-01-15 at 4.55.53 PM

It’s been a long time since we did a book club, and we’re going to do it differently this time. Primarily, we’re simply going to invite you buy the book Inferno (A Poet’s Novel) by Eileen Myles and then come to her reading at Colorado College on February 21 at 7 p.m. in the Gates Common Room as part of the Colorado College Visiting Writer’s Series.

Inferno is a bildungsroman, a coming of age story about a young woman named Eileen Myles who moves from her hometown of Arlington, Massachusetts to New York to become a poet. Following the structure of Dante’s Divine Comedy, Myles takes the reader through the Inferno of her early days in Catholic school and into New York, then up through the Purgatorio of finding a way to be a writer of herself in the city, and finally, into the Heaven of being a full-time poet and writer. This book will take you through the gender fun house of her life in a voice as compelling as Salinger’s Holden Caulfield. How can you not love a writer who responds to Philip Roth’s retirement thusly: “I’m happy he’s still alive, and we won’t have to keep hearing about his boring books. It’s very generous of him to stop.”? She’s truly one of the greatest readers we’ve ever heard and we can’t recommend the reading or Inferno (excertp HERE) enough. But don’t take our word for it; take Alison Bechdel’s:

“I was completely stupefied by Inferno in the best of ways. In fact, I think I must feel kind of like Dante felt after seeing the face of God. My descriptive capacity just fails, gives way completely. But I can tell you that Eileen Myles made me understand something I didn’t before. And really, what more can you ask of a novel, or a poet’s novel, or a poem, or a memoir, or whatever the hell this shimmering document is? Just read it.”

Or watch this video (and ignore the annoying production):

And read THIS INTERVIEW!

You can pick up the book at HERE.

 

2 Responses to The Big Something Book Club Returns: Inferno (A Poet’s Novel) by Eileen Myles

  1. Nancy Wilsted says:

    I got 404′d when I clicked to see where I can buy her book.

    I might agree with her about Robt Lowell except for that line in Skunk Hour: “My mind is not right.” He suffered terribly w/ his mental illness and I think it’s great that he could and did write.

    I look forward to reading Eileen.

  2. Noel Black says:

    Weird about the 404. The first link (which is the same exact link) works, but the second doesn’t, so now I cahnged it and the second link will just take you to O/R books and you have to search for it (scratch head). Sorry.

    I don’t think she was dismissing Lowell altogether. Just a “move”, y’know?

News

NPR
April 17, 2015 | NPR · Golf is a sport that’s been enjoyed by both Democrats and Republicans through the decades, but bipartisan golf outings may be disappearing like a shanked tee shot into a water hazard.
 

April 17, 2015 | NPR · A New Orleans federal appeals court case may determine whether the President can implement his immigration plan before his term is up.
 

April 17, 2015 | NPR · Critics of the system that ushers food products to market say it is rife with conflicts of interest. When scientists depend on food companies for work, they may be less likely to contest food safety.
 

Arts & Life

Courtesy of Samuel Goldwyn Films
April 17, 2015 | NPR · NPR’s Bob Mondello reviews Tangerines, an unconventional war drama that was this year’s Estonian nominee for Best Foreign Language Film.
 

Clear Skies Nevada LLC/IFC Films
April 17, 2015 | NPR · The new film Good Kill is a little too blunt in its treatment of drone warfare, but strong work from Ethan Hawke as a troubled pilot helps it along.
 

April 17, 2015 | NPR · In 2001, Michael Finkel was fired for making up a story. Then he learns that a suspected murderer is posing as him, so he gets to know him. The best word for the drama is “dumb,” says David Edelstein.
 

Music

Courtesy of Decibel
April 18, 2015 | NPR · In the ’60s, the cheap music format was stocked in vending machines and embossed on cereal boxes. Now, magazines like Decibel and bands like Deerhoof are reviving the once-dead flexi disc.
 

Courtesy of the artist
April 18, 2015 | NPR · Stevens says it was hard to let go of her quest for perfection. But after a long creative process, Perfect Animal ended up “exactly how it was meant to be.”
 

Courtesy of Acoustic Sounds
April 17, 2015 | NPR · What’s getting in the way of the much touted resurgence of vinyl albums? There are very few functioning record presses, and nobody’s making new ones.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab