Residents of Mountain Shadows who lost homes to the Waldo Canyon fire will have to abide by a stricter fire code when they rebuild. As KRCC’s Liz Ruskin reports, Colorado Springs City Council today passed new rules for the city’s hillside neighborhoods.

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The codes require new houses on the western edge to be made from more fire-resistant materials. They also include landscaping restrictions. The rules are projected to add about $6,000 to construction costs per home.

Several people who lost properties in Mountain Shadows say the new rules just add to their woes. Jonni McCoy spoke at the council session, saying her insurance is only paying about 50 cents on the dollar.

“So we’re already having to choose what things not to ever replace. If these burdens are placed on us, we have to choose even further what not to replace in order to pay for the code. I don’t think that’s fair.”

Older houses in the neighborhood won’t have to bring their properties up to the new standards.
Councilwoman Lisa Czelatdko says she understands how they feel but says it’s a start to creating a safer city. It passed 6-2, with councilors Angela Doogan and Tim Leigh voting no. Council President Scott Hente was recused.

(PDF of new codes.)

 

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