If you follow local music in Colorado Springs, then it’s likely that you’ve already encountered Grant Sabin in some capacity. As a founding member of the “Kings of Space” collective (previously featured on The Big Something), guitarist and vocalist in several local bands, and distinctively mustachioed/bearded fellow, his presence is unmistakably felt in the music scene here. If you’re not yet familiar with him…well, it’s only a matter of time. Sabin is set to release a new album this month–produced in association with the good folks over at Blank Tape Records–and if the tracks that I’ve heard are any indication, I expect it will be receiving quite a bit of attention in the very near future.

We invited Sabin and his drummer, Alex Koshak (also of the Flumps and Briffaut) into our studio at the Tim Gill Center for Public Media to play a few songs and to talk about the album, “Anthromusicology”. Watch the video above, and if you like what you see/hear, consider getting yourself a ticket to see the Grant Sabin Band in all their fully-amplified glory, together with special guests The Haunted Windchimes and Chimney Choir, at Stargazers theater on Friday, December 14th. Tickets are available HERE.

 

4 Responses to Grant Sabin Does a Number, or Three

  1. elizabeth osborne says:

    wow! just heard grant sabin band and all i can say is wow !!

  2. Jeremy says:

    Sweet. Love that talented local music – Sabin rocks.

  3. Gramps says:

    It’s unbelievable, blew me away. Go Grant Go!

  4. Sally in PA says:

    Thanks for the introduction of a new talent. Love that beat & picking. Wish I could be in the area Dec. 14.

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