The Colorado Oil and Gas Association has filed a lawsuit seeking to overturn a fracking ban approved by Longmont voters. COGA says the ban illegally prohibits the ‘safe and responsible development of oil and gas.’ Earlier this month the state decided against filing a similar lawsuit, but says it supports the action taken by the oil and gas industry.

Sam Schabacker is with the consumer advocacy group Food and Water Watch that helped pass the ban. He says they’re meeting with a team of legal experts to see how to best support the city.

“The people of Longmont spoke resoundingly 60% to 40% a month and a half ago to say they did not want fracking next to their homes and schools. And now the oil and gas industry has decided that they want to undermine a democratic vote in order to put a dangerous industrial activity next to homes and schools in the city of Longmont.

The oil and gas reserves under Longmont are estimated to be worth 500 million dollars. COGA president Tisha Schueller says they recognize that some citizens of Longmont are concerned about the safety of Hydraulic Fracturing. However, she hopes they can be addressed in a way that doesn’t prohibit the development of oil and gas reserves in the area.


From Rocky Mountain Community Radio sister station, KUNC.

 

One Response to COGA Sues over Fracking Ban

  1. Randee Webb says:

    COGA and its individual members have proven the current development of oil and gas to be UNSAFE and IRRESPONSIBLE. Is it any wonder that citizens are concerned for their safety, health, and lifestyle. Schueller’s hopes that citizens’ concerns can be addressed is just a smoke screen and stalling tactic; after all, people have been asking for statewide regulations that would truly protect our health, our children, our water, our land, our air, our inalienable right to life, etc., for well over a year to no avail. The oil & gas industry experiment with fracking has gone horribly wrong. It’s time to “just say NO.”

News

May 23, 2015 | NPR · Workers continue to clean the coastline near Santa Barbara, where some 105,000 gallons of crude oil were spilled. Several pelicans, both dead and alive, have been found soaked in oil.
 

May 23, 2015 | NPR · Cleveland residents are on edge after a white police officer was found not guilty in the 2012 shooting deaths of an unarmed black driver and his passenger. The shooting ended a high-speed car chase.
 

Reuters/Landov
May 23, 2015 | NPR · The ceremony for Oscar Romero — who was gunned down during mass in the capital, San Salvador, in 1980 — is the last step before being declared a saint by the Vatican.
 

Arts & Life

NPR
May 23, 2015 | NPR · It’s Chinatown meets Mad Max in writer Paolo Bacigalupi’s new desert dystopia, filled with climate refugees, powerful state border patrols, and secret agents called water knives.
 

Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures.
May 23, 2015 | NPR · BASE jumping pioneer Carl Boenish became famous for jumping with his wife Jean in the 1970s and ’80s. Marah Strauch, director of the documentary, says “this felt like a love story to me.”
 

May 23, 2015 | NPR · In Nell Zink’s new book, Mislaid, a young woman marries her male professor. It’s 1965. She likes women; he likes men. What follows is a biting satire about gender, race and sexuality.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
May 23, 2015 | NPR · The polymath pianist and composer has released three new albums — including a recording of his own Mass, whose writing was interrupted by a disastrous car accident.
 

Getty Images
May 23, 2015 | NPR · A defense of the monumental, enduring, deceptively complex Swedish pop quartet, and the underlying emotion that has helped its hooks connect with fans for generations.
 

Sean Mikha'el Field for NPR
May 23, 2015 | NPR · Working-class youths invented the steel drum in the 1930s by banging dents in the tops of discarded oil drums to create notes. Today, steelpan is Trinidad’s de facto national instrument.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab