The Colorado Oil and Gas Association has filed a lawsuit seeking to overturn a fracking ban approved by Longmont voters. COGA says the ban illegally prohibits the ‘safe and responsible development of oil and gas.’ Earlier this month the state decided against filing a similar lawsuit, but says it supports the action taken by the oil and gas industry.

Sam Schabacker is with the consumer advocacy group Food and Water Watch that helped pass the ban. He says they’re meeting with a team of legal experts to see how to best support the city.

“The people of Longmont spoke resoundingly 60% to 40% a month and a half ago to say they did not want fracking next to their homes and schools. And now the oil and gas industry has decided that they want to undermine a democratic vote in order to put a dangerous industrial activity next to homes and schools in the city of Longmont.

The oil and gas reserves under Longmont are estimated to be worth 500 million dollars. COGA president Tisha Schueller says they recognize that some citizens of Longmont are concerned about the safety of Hydraulic Fracturing. However, she hopes they can be addressed in a way that doesn’t prohibit the development of oil and gas reserves in the area.


From Rocky Mountain Community Radio sister station, KUNC.

 

One Response to COGA Sues over Fracking Ban

  1. Randee Webb says:

    COGA and its individual members have proven the current development of oil and gas to be UNSAFE and IRRESPONSIBLE. Is it any wonder that citizens are concerned for their safety, health, and lifestyle. Schueller’s hopes that citizens’ concerns can be addressed is just a smoke screen and stalling tactic; after all, people have been asking for statewide regulations that would truly protect our health, our children, our water, our land, our air, our inalienable right to life, etc., for well over a year to no avail. The oil & gas industry experiment with fracking has gone horribly wrong. It’s time to “just say NO.”

News

ACP Decisions
March 29, 2015 | NPR · A program in Hawaii aims to reduce the number of older people who spend their final days of life in a hospital. Hawaii has one of the highest rates of hospital deaths for those over age 65 in the U.S.
 

AP
March 29, 2015 | NPR · The two sides are reportedly close to a deal ahead of a Tuesday deadline, but diplomatic sources caution that an agreement could still fall apart.
 

Xinhua/Landov
March 29, 2015 | NPR · The 22-member body agreed in principle to the military force that could be rapidly deployed to regional trouble spots.
 

Arts & Life

March 29, 2015 | NPR · During the Sino-Japanese War, Huan Hsu’s great-great-grandfather buried his vast porcelain collection to keep it safe. Hsu went to find it 70 years later, on a trip about more than missing china.
 

Showtime
March 29, 2015 | NPR · The Bronx native grew up in a blue-collar household; a life in show business seemed far from reality. He spent time in the Air Force and as a cop before he finally gave his childhood dream a chance.
 

March 29, 2015 | KVCR · Palm Springs was the desert playground of golden-era Hollywood. Then its glamour faded. Now its mid-century architecture, its retro style and the allure of its past are fueling a rebirth.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
March 29, 2015 | NPR · The Global Village host is back with a stack of music that tests the sonic limits of the squeezebox.
 

Courtesy of the artist
March 29, 2015 | NPR · The electronic act scored its first hit with “Dangerous,” a hard-grooving single that exuded digital-age fears about privacy. Founder Alan Wilkis spoke with Rachel Martin about the new album 2.0.
 

Courtesy of the artist
March 29, 2015 | NPR · The Melbourne rocker makes her witty songcraft look easy. Performing and socializing, however, are a whole other battle.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab