The Colorado Oil and Gas Association has filed a lawsuit seeking to overturn a fracking ban approved by Longmont voters. COGA says the ban illegally prohibits the ‘safe and responsible development of oil and gas.’ Earlier this month the state decided against filing a similar lawsuit, but says it supports the action taken by the oil and gas industry.

Sam Schabacker is with the consumer advocacy group Food and Water Watch that helped pass the ban. He says they’re meeting with a team of legal experts to see how to best support the city.

“The people of Longmont spoke resoundingly 60% to 40% a month and a half ago to say they did not want fracking next to their homes and schools. And now the oil and gas industry has decided that they want to undermine a democratic vote in order to put a dangerous industrial activity next to homes and schools in the city of Longmont.

The oil and gas reserves under Longmont are estimated to be worth 500 million dollars. COGA president Tisha Schueller says they recognize that some citizens of Longmont are concerned about the safety of Hydraulic Fracturing. However, she hopes they can be addressed in a way that doesn’t prohibit the development of oil and gas reserves in the area.


From Rocky Mountain Community Radio sister station, KUNC.

 

One Response to COGA Sues over Fracking Ban

  1. Randee Webb says:

    COGA and its individual members have proven the current development of oil and gas to be UNSAFE and IRRESPONSIBLE. Is it any wonder that citizens are concerned for their safety, health, and lifestyle. Schueller’s hopes that citizens’ concerns can be addressed is just a smoke screen and stalling tactic; after all, people have been asking for statewide regulations that would truly protect our health, our children, our water, our land, our air, our inalienable right to life, etc., for well over a year to no avail. The oil & gas industry experiment with fracking has gone horribly wrong. It’s time to “just say NO.”

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