Disney’s “Fantasy” Cruise Ship. Photo Credit Disney Cruise Lines.

The devastating effects of Hurricane Sandy have been well-documented by now, more than two weeks after the storm first landed on American soil. But, as is usually the case in the weeks and months following a natural disaster of news-cycle-dominating proportions, the attendant stories of hope, tragedy, heroism, frustration, and downright absurdity are only just beginning to surface. Often times these stories are the most fascinating ones, providing emotional texture and context to the sometimes incomprehensible statistics that roll in with the first wave of reportage. They remind us that a major news event like Hurricane Sandy (AKA the “Frankenstorm”) is not a monolithic thing, but rather an amalgamation of the diverse and idiosyncratic experiences of those people caught up in it.

It recently came to our attention that Kelsey Prescott, a friend of The Big Something and employee at Rocky Mountain PBS, had one such story to share about her experience weathering the Frankenstorm. While the rest of us were watching the storm unfold from our safe, landlocked vantage point here in Colorado, Kelsey, her husband, Brian, and her parents-in-law were aboard a Disney cruise ship in the Caribbean, careening inexorably toward the heart of the hurricane. We had Kelsey into the station to tell her story, and, as you might expect, it’s equal parts terrifying, surreal, hilarious, and wacky. Listen below, then scroll down to see some of Kelsey’s photos from the trip.

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Disney Debacle on the High Seas

The sea: so mighty, so serene!

The weather grows ominous, a rainbow portends danger to come…

A thin, transparent membrane separates shelter and storm.

The last supper.

Mickey and friends commemorate the final night of the cruise with a joyous celebration.

Gift shop in disarray #1.

Gift shop in disarray #2.

Gift shop in disarray #3.

All is well that ends well.

 

One Response to Disney Debacle on the High Seas

  1. Michael J. Matthews says:

    What an experience, and well told, too – thanks, Kelsey! Glad you’re back, safe and sound. Didn’t want to here about any Rose and Jack moments on this cruise.

    Mike Matthews

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