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The American Civil Liberties Union, or ACLU, has filed a federal lawsuit in Denver after the Colorado Springs City Council yesterday voted to approve a panhandling ban. The lawsuit seeks to block the new ordinance, and also seeks an immediate injunction against the rules, which are set to go into effect next week. Plaintiffs include advocacy organizations, a street musician, and a nonprofit theater group. The rules passed by a vote of 8-1, with councilman Val Snider as the lone ‘no’ vote. The ACLU argues the ‘no solicitation’ rules are too broad and violate free speech rights. City Attorney Chris Melcher yesterday said the ordinance is modeled after another city’s panhandling ban that has survived court challenges.


While Washington lawmakers wrestle with the fiscal cliff, Colorado Senator Mark Udall continues to press fellow members of Congress for an extension of the Wind Production Tax Credit. Udall says recent layoffs in the wind industry, including jobs in Colorado at Vestas Wind Systems, do little to help the economy and create jobs…

“For me enough is enough. These layoffs should be a wakeup call for all or our colleagues who oppose extending the PTC or are content to just let it lapse.”

The American Wind Energy Association estimates 37,000 jobs, including hundreds in Colorado, would be lost if the credit expires at the end of the year. Military veterans who’ve found careers in the wind energy industry are also joining Udall in calling for the tax extension. Some Republicans also support extending the tax credit, but others, including Rep. Doug Lamborn, see it as wasteful spending.

 

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News

AP
May 25, 2016 | NPR · It’s illegal to sell ceremonial such items in the U.S., but they’re popular (and profitable) in France. The art and artifacts are due to hit the auction block Monday.
 

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May 25, 2016 | NPR · The health agency is making changes so it can get boots on the ground if a pandemic strikes. But critics say it hasn’t gone far enough.
 

AP
May 25, 2016 | NPR · House Republicans will begin rolling out their policy agenda in June.
 

Arts & Life

Claire Harbage
May 25, 2016 | NPR · Justin Cronin’s blood-and-thunder tale of a viral vampire apocalypse began in 2010 with The Passage. He brings it to a rousing conclusion in his new book, hitting all the beats fans have waited for.
 

Courtesy of Bella Spurrier
May 24, 2016 | NPR · Forty years ago, the top names in French food and wine judged a blind tasting pitting the finest French wines against unknown California bottles. The results revolutionized the wine industry.
 

May 24, 2016 | NPR · NPR’s Audie Cornish speaks with Dan Vyleta about his novel, Smoke. It’s set in an alternate 19th century London, where the morally corrupt are marked by a smoke that pours from their bodies.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
May 25, 2016 | NPR · After starting a band with young proteges and touring a successful American Football reunion, Mike Kinsella has a new sense of purpose on a lush, lively new album, his ninth under the name Owen.
 

Courtesy of the author
May 24, 2016 | WXPN · To celebrate Dylan’s 75th birthday, hear about his special relationship with Woodstock, N.Y., the subject of Hoskyns’ book.
 

Courtesy of the artists
May 24, 2016 | NPR · On this week’s episode we’ve got one of the sunniest bands of all time, mesmerizing music from the Sahara and an elegy to growing old.
 

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