The end is near for The Big Something’s first ever foray into the physical realm. Tomorrow, Tuesday, November 20th, is the last possible day to see The Big Something Exhibition–in CC’s Coburn Gallery–before it’s stripped and all its component pieces are returned to their rightful owners. If you haven’t made the trip yet, it’s truly worth coming down to see this eclectic collection of art, artifacts, ephemera, and memorabilia, which together stand as kind of monument to the cultural richness and vitality of Pikes Peak Region. In the words of Noel Black:

I think [this exhibition] brings the artifacts themselves closer to people. The idea was that interact[ing] with people in the digital format all the time is less tangible. I’m not saying it’s an inauthentic way of interacting, but it’s nice sometimes to just gather people together. It’s a way of culminating efforts, or of bringing together the physical community that you’re trying to create online. I think that these, the artifacts that are on the walls … it’s meant more to be a mirror for the community to see itself in a different light and in a more complicated way than I think we tend to see ourselves. It’s almost like a boosterism campaign, but what we’re trying to promote is a more complicated, nuanced and rich view of something. I mean ultimately it’s a battle of ideas, and we would like to put forward that this is a more interesting and an ultimately truer vision of what this community is…

–Excerpted from CC Senior Andrea Tudhope’s recent interview with Noel about the exhibition, published in this month’s issue of The Cipher (CC’s student produced non-fiction magazine). Read the full interview HERE

So head down to the Coburn Gallery–located inside the Colorado College Worner Center, 902 N Cascade Ave–while you still can (the gallery is open 1pm-7pm). You won’t regret it.


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