The end is near for The Big Something’s first ever foray into the physical realm. Tomorrow, Tuesday, November 20th, is the last possible day to see The Big Something Exhibition–in CC’s Coburn Gallery–before it’s stripped and all its component pieces are returned to their rightful owners. If you haven’t made the trip yet, it’s truly worth coming down to see this eclectic collection of art, artifacts, ephemera, and memorabilia, which together stand as kind of monument to the cultural richness and vitality of Pikes Peak Region. In the words of Noel Black:

I think [this exhibition] brings the artifacts themselves closer to people. The idea was that interact[ing] with people in the digital format all the time is less tangible. I’m not saying it’s an inauthentic way of interacting, but it’s nice sometimes to just gather people together. It’s a way of culminating efforts, or of bringing together the physical community that you’re trying to create online. I think that these, the artifacts that are on the walls … it’s meant more to be a mirror for the community to see itself in a different light and in a more complicated way than I think we tend to see ourselves. It’s almost like a boosterism campaign, but what we’re trying to promote is a more complicated, nuanced and rich view of something. I mean ultimately it’s a battle of ideas, and we would like to put forward that this is a more interesting and an ultimately truer vision of what this community is…

–Excerpted from CC Senior Andrea Tudhope’s recent interview with Noel about the exhibition, published in this month’s issue of The Cipher (CC’s student produced non-fiction magazine). Read the full interview HERE

So head down to the Coburn Gallery–located inside the Colorado College Worner Center, 902 N Cascade Ave–while you still can (the gallery is open 1pm-7pm). You won’t regret it.

 

Comments are closed.

News

Xinhua /Landov
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Russian and Ukrainian officials are meeting today with Russia-backed separatists and international monitors, but the sides remain far apart and the fighting continues in the eastern part of Ukraine.
 

Getty Images
September 1, 2014 | NPR · An oft-repeated bit of campaign advice held that, “It’s the economy, stupid.” But maybe in this mid-term election cycle, that’s not quite right.
 

September 1, 2014 | NPR · The law requires doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges to a nearby hospital. The judge’s ruling allows the law to take effect, but doctors who break it won’t be penalized.
 

Arts & Life

Alison Rosa
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Until Guardians of the Galaxy came along, this year’s box office figures were the worst in years. But critic Bob Mondello says there are bound to be some fall films that get pulses pounding again.
 

Jonathan Ring
September 1, 2014 | NPR · NPR’s Madhulika Sikka profiles Cumming, the author of thoughtful spy sagas like A Colder War. Cumming’s books provide plenty of action, but also grapple with the moral quandaries of espionage.
 

September 1, 2014 | NPR · MK Asante reads a poem composed for Morning Edition titled, “In Summer.” The Baltimore-based writer says it is in tribute to Paul Laurence Dunbar, an African-American poet.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
August 31, 2014 | NPR · After a three-year hiatus, the singer’s 14th album is the sound of a once-prolific genius who’s only recently relearned what it’s like to walk on steady footing.
 

Courtesy of the artist
August 31, 2014 | NPR · On his 11th album, the Massive Attack star still showcases a brooding, searching spirit and a cinematic sense of atmosphere. But he also plays around with new facets of his persona.
 

Courtesy of the artist
August 31, 2014 | NPR · Madman shows Rowe mixing his folk and junk-shop rock styles together with new elements: soul, blues, gospel, R&B. The upshot, surprisingly, is his most coherent record yet.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab